Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Courses

 

Courses 100-199

GEE167 Engineering Graphics I

The course introduces the students to the use of engineering graphics in the engineering design process. Graphical communication and visualization are emphasized by both paper sketching and computer-aided methods. The student is introduced to computer-aided drafting and design techniques using SolidWorks 3D CAD software. Topics studied are sketching, applied geometry, solid modeling, multi-view and pictorial projection, sectional views, auxiliary views and dimensioning.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
1 - 2 - 3
Credit(s):
1
 

Courses 200-299

MEE231 Structural Analysis and Introduction to Strength of Materials

This course exposes students to various types of supports and external forces acting on an elastic body and to the static equilibrium equations for 2-D and 3-D structures. Calculation of reactions for structural members subjected to external forces and moments is presented. Engineering statics is further emphasized with many examples of calculations of internal forces and the concept of free body, axial, torsion, shear force and bending moment diagrams. Students acquire the ability to visualize associated deflected shapes and to perform the structural analysis of mechanisms, statically determinate and statically indeterminate struts and shafts. Properties of cross-sections are presented, including the location of the centroid and the first and second area moments. The course includes the definition and calculation of basic stress and strain components at a point due to the internal loadings found in typical mechanical and aerospace systems, such as struts, trusses, beams, frames, shafts, bolts, gears, spars, ribs, etc. Hooke’s law including thermal stresses and strains is also presented. Finally, students are introduced to the calculation of 2-D and 3-D combined stresses and to the basic concept of stress transformation at a point.

Prerequisite(s):
PHE104
Note(s):
For students taking Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 2 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE233 Introduction to Manufacturing Processes

This course presents an introduction to a wide variety of fabrication processes used in modern manufacturing such as casting, forging, composite construction, joining and rapid prototyping. Emphasis is placed on understanding the strengths and limitations of each approach. Other topics include manufacturing standards, such as fits and tolerances, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T), engineering drawings, intellectual property and safety.

Prerequisite(s):
GEE167
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 2 - 3
Credit(s):
1

MEE245 Applied Mechanics

This course builds upon the foundations established in PHE104. The principles of kinetics and kinematics of particles are reviewed. Planar and 3D kinematics of rigid bodies is presented. Newton's Second Law, Work and Energy, and Impulse and Momentum are applied to planar and 3D rigid body kinetics. Practical engineering applications are used as examples to illustrate the theory and as problem assignments.

Prerequisite(s):
MAE119, MAE226, PHE104
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

Courses 300-399

MEE301 Machine Design

Previous work in mechanics, stress analysis, and metallurgy, as well as new knowledge regarding safety factors, failure criteria, stress concentration factors and fatigue, is applied to the practical design of machinery. The course is oriented towards the specific design of various machine elements such as shafts, welds, cables, bolts, journal bearings, gears, gear trains, belt drives, brakes, etc..

Prerequisite(s):
MEE331, MEE333
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE303 Engineering Design

This course presents the processes of problem solving and engineering design. The design and/or redesign of sub-systems/components are examined in isolation. At the component level, the tasks of establishing a design specification, considering alternative principles of operation and arrangements of functional elements, selecting potential solutions and utilizing computer aided design software to assess the design are applied with respect to societal and technical needs. Alternative solutions are assessed based on achievement of the component specification. The course utilizes integrated lectures and mini-projects to develop and understand the design process for a simple technical system. Written technical reports will be submitted by students about the devices they design to satisfy a given set of requirements.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE233
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE311 Fluid Mechanics I

This course emphasizes the basic concepts of fluid dynamics. The course includes a study of the following: fluid properties, fluid statics, fundamental equations of fluid motion, control volume concept applied to the continuity, momentum, and energy equations, the Euler and Bernoulli equations, flow measuring devices, similitude and dimensional analysis, incompressible flow in conduits, introduction to the concepts of boundary layer in laminar and turbulent flows, external flows, and hydraulic turbo machines. The lectures are supplemented by problem assignments and experiments conducted in the laboratory, including forces on submerged surfaces, velocity measurements in internal flows, and pumps.

Prerequisite(s):
PHE205, MAE226
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE313 Fluid Mechanics II

This course extends the study of Fluid Dynamics initiated in MEE311. The following topics are covered: dynamics of inviscid flows; potential flow theory and methods of solution based on superposition of potential flows; viscous flow theory (Navier-Stokes equations); boundary layer and external flows. An introduction to computational fluid dynamics is also presented. The course is supplemented with assignments and laboratory experiments.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE311, MAE328
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE315 Fluid Dynamics

This course provides the basic concepts of fluid mechanics. It includes a study of the basic fluid properties, hydrostatics and the fundamental equations of fluid motion.  The control volume concept is introduced and applied to the continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Appropriate simplifications result in the Bernoulli equation that is used for practical applications. Students are initiated to dimensional analysis and similitude. An introduction to the concepts of boundary layer for laminar and turbulent flows is given. Viscous flow understanding is then applied to the empirical calculation of incompressible flow in pipes. Finally, the students are exposed to the analysis of open channel flows, as well as an introduction to pumps. The lectures are supplemented by problem assignments and experiments conducted in the laboratory, including measurement of pressure and hydrostatic pressures on submerged surfaces, velocity and flow rates, and weirs.

Prerequisite(s):
PHE205, MAE226
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE321 Heat Engines Laboratory

A laboratory course illustrating the general principles, operating characteristics, and thermodynamic analysis of internal combustion engines, and steam and gas turbines.

This course is part of CCE321.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
0 - 2 - 2
Credit(s):
0

MEE331 Strength of Materials

This intermediate course in strength of materials develops the relationships between stresses, strains, deformations, and external loads for linear elastic bodies in three dimensions. Emphasis is given to the following topics: stress and strain at a point, strain-displacement relationships, the principle of superposition, combined stresses, stress and strain transformation at a point, principal stresses, overall maximum shear stress using Mohr’s circles for stress, strain and moments of inertia. Other topics include non-homogeneous bars, indeterminate beams in bending, non-symmetric bending of beams, shear stresses and shear flow in thin-webbed beams, concept of shear center, column buckling, failure criteria etc..

Prerequisite(s):
GEE231
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE333 Metallurgy and Engineering Materials

This course in materials science and engineering emphasizes the relationships between the structure and the mechanical properties of engineering materials. The effects of different strengthening mechanisms and thermal processing are studied. Failure mechanisms such as ductile and brittle fractures, fatigue, creep, and corrosion are covered. Emphasis is placed on properties and processing of metallic materials. The lectures are supplemented by tutorials, assignments on theory and applications, and laboratory experiments with cold working, heat-treating and metallography.

Prerequisite(s):
CCE101, GEE231
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE346 Modelling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems

This course is a continuation of MEE245. Topics covered include: derivation and solution of equations of motion using Newtonian and Lagrange methods, transfer function, time response of first and second order systems, free and forced vibration of single and multiple degrees of freedom systems, time domain and frequency response of cascaded and coupled systems. MATLAB/SIMULINK is used to simulate the dynamic response of these systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MAE328, MEE245, PHE205
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE351 Thermodynamics I

This course is a study of classical Thermodynamics by examining its application to practical devices such as engines and refrigeration systems. The First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics are analyzed in detail and applied to gases and two phase mixtures used in the studied devices. The lectures are supplemented by problem assignments and experiments during laboratory periods.

Prerequisite(s):
CCE101, MAE226
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE353 Thermodynamics II

This course continues the study of classical thermodynamics begun in MEE351. Further applications in power producing devices and refrigeration systems, mixtures and solutions, and compressible flows are studied in detail. The course is oriented towards practical applications such as power production and cogeneration, heating and air conditioning, humidification and dehumidification. The course introduces gas dynamics; it covers compressible flow in nozzles and diffusers, and normal shock waves. The lectures are supplemented by problem assignments and laboratory experiments.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE351
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hour(s):
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

MEE401 Machine Design II

A number of basic machine elements not previously studied, such as ball and roller contact bearings, belt and chain drives, springs, brakes and clutches are first introduced, followed by practical case studies involving the detailed design of these elements. This course is centered on the detailed design project of a machine assembly such as a multi-stage transmission comprising of a number of machine elements. The course project involves teams of two students working on the assigned machine assembly, starting from the evaluation of the external loads (from the initial given data) to the detailed design and selection of the individual components and the production of the required technical drawings, as if this assembly were to be fabricated in the machine shop.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE301
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE404 Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing

The aim of the course is to teach the principles of computer-aided design and manufacturing. Topics covered include parametric design, simulation, optimization, prototyping and computerized manufacturing. Students will gain hands-on experience through classroom examples, assignments and projects.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE233
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE407 Finite Element Methods

This course is an introductory course studying the theory and application of the finite element method as used in solving engineering problems. Topics covered include the discretization of the model, the derivation of elemental and global stiffness matrices, the determination of appropriate boundary conditions and resolution of the obtained global matrix system. Additional modeling topics that are encountered in practice are also discussed. This course has a large practical component, where commercial finite element software is used to perform stress analyses on two and three dimensional structures or components.

Prerequisite(s):
 MEE331
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE417 Introduction to Biomechanics

Biomechanics consists of the application of mechanical principles to human or animal bodies in movement or at rest. This introductory course to biomechanics aims at providing the student with notions and principles of biomechanics with specific applications to the modeling of the musculoskeletal system. Among the topics covered, one finds the introduction to the functional anatomy, the kinematic and dynamic modeling of the human body in movement, the anthropometric models and the modeling of the mechanical behaviour of some tissues.

Prerequisite(s):
 MEE245
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE421 Heat Transfer

This course introduces students to the three basic heat transfer processes, namely, conduction, convection and radiation. Specific topics include steady one- and two-dimensional conduction; external convection over a flat-plate and over a circular cylinder in cross-flow; laminar and turbulent internal convection through a straight pipe; conduction-convection heat exchanger analysis; Stefan Boltzmann law, Planck distribution law and Wien displacement law for blackbody surface thermal radiation. The lectures are supplemented by laboratory work which includes the determination of thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer coefficient.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE311, MEE351
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5- 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE423 Applied Heat Transfer

This course covers concepts of heat transfer as they apply to engineering. Topics include, free and forced convection, boiling and condensation, thermal radiation exchange between surfaces, and combined heat transfer as it applies to HVAC. These heat transfer concepts are approached analytically and numerically, and semi-empirical correlations are also discussed. The coupling between the hydrodynamic and thermal fields is underlined in the case of free or mixed convection. The engineering applications that are considered are: Cooling in nuclear reactors and gas turbine blades and conceptual Design of heat exchangers. Solar power generators for space vehicles are also studied.

Prerequisite(s):
 MEE421
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE425 Renewable Energy

The aim of this course is to examine renewable energy sources and generation systems and the impact of their use on the environment. The course includes the study of different technologies used to harness natural energy. Examples studied are: Thermal and photovoltaic solar, wind, tidal and geothermal energy. This course applies concepts learned in fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Projects on solar and wind energy are undertaken during the term.

Prerequisite(s):
 MEE313
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE431 Stress Analysis

This is an advanced course in stress analysis, covering various topics, such as, the three dimensional theory of elasticity including the concept of stress functions directly applied to rotating disks, thick-walled pressure vessels and non-circular bars in torsion. Additional topics include failure theories, energy methods, composite materials and finite element laboratory applications.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE331
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE433 Mechanical Behaviour of Advanced Materials

This course continues the study of engineering materials to cover in depth plastics, ceramics, composites, and specialty alloys. The focus is on mechanical properties, uses, manufacturing and processing of these advanced materials.

The applications of these materials in engineering are also outlined. The effects of temperature, environment, failure mechanisms and prevention are covered. Mechanical behaviour under cyclic loading, fatigue, and fracture mechanics are presented.

The lectures are supplemented by laboratory experiments and demonstrations.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE331, MEE333
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE435 Experimental Techniques in Materials Engineering

This is a course on the measurement of mechanical properties of engineering materials. Emphasis is placed on precise measurement and application of relevant standard test methods for material properties. Lecture material covers the microstructure – material behaviour interactions, data reduction techniques and statistical analysis. Students develop their knowledge and skills in material behavior, experimental techniques, data analysis, and technical report writing.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE333
Note(s):
Enrolment is limited to 8 students, with priority given to the Mechanical Engineering programme. Individual grades in MEE333 will be used as the enrolment criterion.
Contact Hours:
2 - 2 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE437 Robot Dynamics and Control

This course covers the following topics: Classification of robot manipulators, Homogeneous Transformations, Euler Angles, Denavit Hartenberg Convention, Forward and Inverse Kinematics. Manipulator Jacobians, Robot Dynamics, Design of joint actuating systems, Independent joint control, Point-To-Point control, Path planning and trajectory control, Sensory components for robot control, Space application of robotic systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE346
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE438 Applied Process Control

Main topics: Control loops, design of control systems, real aspects, and digital control concepts.

This course represents a continuation of the "Feedback Control of Electro-Mechanical Systems" course. The student has the opportunity to study different aspects and applications of control processes in more detail. The course outline consists mainly of two parts. In the first part, topics of control of real processes, control loop structures, PID controllers and tuning methods, cascade, ratio and feed-forward controls, control hardware, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), and micro-controllers are discussed in addition to concepts of stability and robustness. In the second part, aspects of real-time control are initiated using methods for analysis and design of discrete-time control systems, sampling theorem and Z-transform. Case studies include simulation and experiments of electromechanical systems, hydraulic and pneumatic position control, liquid level control etc.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE443
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE443 Feedback Control of Electro-Mechanical Systems

A first course in linear feedback control systems which logically follows MEE346: Modelling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems. The material is covered under the following main topics: performance specifications and preliminary design, stability criteria, and techniques of feedback control. The examples and the problems used to illustrate the theory concentrates on mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems as used on current military hardware. MATLAB/SIMULINK is used for the design of control systems and to carry out the simulations. Electromechanical systems are used in the lab to implement the PID controllers discussed in class.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE346
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

MEE446 Introduction to Micro-and Nano Engineering

This course will introduce students to fundamental principles governing fluids and materials at the small scale. Microfabrication techniques, such as plasma-based etching and deposition, of microscale and nanoscale elements will be investigated and illustrated for relevant mechanical and aerospace engineering applications. The small scale elements can also be assembled into more complex systems: a course project will consider the design of selected mechanical engineering applications (e.g.: micro-pump; micro-motor; micro heat-exchanger). Nano-motors and nano-machines will also be studied.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE311, MEE313, MEE421
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE451 Combustion Engines

After a review of basic thermodynamic and combustion principles necessary for studying the topics of interest, the lectures consider the design and operation of spark-ignition, Diesel, and gas turbine engines. Some of the topics studied are: fuel and ignition systems; supercharging, combustion chambers; properties and performance of fuels; sources and control of air pollution; alcohol, hydrogen, and other non-conventional fuels. The lectures are supplemented by assignments and laboratory experiments.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE353
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE469 Marine Systems Engineering

This course considers the main engineering issues involved in the design and operation of ships. The topics studied include: hull design for surface ships and submarines, including drag and stability; selection and performance of propulsion engines, including diesels, gas turbines and electric propulsion; propellers and water jet drives; generation and control of on-board electricity; weapon systems; and life support systems. The course is focused on the fundamental principles that drive the design of the systems studied, but also discusses recent technology and future developments.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE311, MEE351
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

MEE471 Engineering Project

This course provides the student with the opportunity to undertake a project of sufficient magnitude to include all essential elements of an independent engineering study, under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are expected to perform a thorough literature survey on their selected topic, propose a plan of action, prepare a schedule for the major phases of the project, design and build the apparatus and the instrumentation as required, integrate theory taught in previous engineering courses, and acquire the new knowledge required for the analytical portion of the project. The project should integrate nontechnical considerations, such as economic factors, sustainable development, health and safety, ethics and legal constraints. Students submit short biweekly written progress reports and one final written report to the faculty and give two oral presentations to classmates and faculty members during the course of the year.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE303 and 7 Mechanical Engineering credits at the 300-level.
Contact Hours:
0 - 3 - 3 (Fall Term)
Contact Hours:
0 - 4 - 4 (Winter Term)
Credit(s):
1.5

MEE482 Instrumentation

This course presents an exhaustive analysis of various measurement, processing and acquisition devices used in mechanical systems. The course allows students to strengthen certain fundamental aspects of modeling, simulation and operation of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, and thermal systems, as well as to identify important parameters in these models. Various measuring instruments and interfacing techniques of electro-mechanical systems are studied. This course presents methods of signal analysis and processing, and their applications in mechanical engineering.

Prerequisite(s):
GEE241, MAE209, MEE311, MEE346
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1
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