Undergraduate Psychology Courses

 
 

Courses 100-199

PSE103 Introduction to Human Psychology

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of basic psychological principles. The essentials of the scientific method and its application to psychology will be presented. Concepts such as development, learning, memory, motivation, intelligence, stress and health, personality, psychological disorders, and social psychology will be discussed.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
A required course for all students in Arts, Science and Engineering.
Exclusion(s):
PSE123
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

PSE105 Social Psychology

This course provides a comprehensive treatment of the major topics and issues in social psychology. The course will emphasize the unique contribution of social psychology to the theory of social behaviour in such areas as social beliefs and judgements, behaviour and attitudes, attitude change, culture and gender, conformity and obedience, persuasion, prejudice and discrimination, aggression, and social conflicts and their resolution. Students will apply theories and concepts of social psychology to the analysis of the military and social milieu.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE120 Aboriginal Peoples and the Military

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to historical and contemporary understandings of the relations between Aboriginal Peoples and the military with an emphasis on drawing on the social sciences to examine the Canadian context. Areas covered include: relations amongst Aboriginal Peoples, the Crown and Canadian Society; the experiences of Aboriginal members serving in the military; examination of unique aspects of the cultures of Original/Aboriginal/Indigenous Peoples and the dominant cultures of military including the Canadian Forces; and, consideration of Aboriginal and military images, beliefs and practices of the warrior and the leader.

Note(s):
Students should normally be enrolled in the Aboriginal preparatory programme
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE192 Directed Readings in Psychology

The content of this course is more advanced and is related to the studies already completed by the student.

Directed Reading Only

Note(s):
Available upon permission of the department head to Arts students repeating 1st year.
Credit(s):
2

Courses 200-299

PSE211 Research Methodology in Psychology

This course takes a broad approach to research methods in the behavioural sciences. Students are introduced to basic concepts in experimental design and statistical analysis of psychological data. More specifically, students are taught how to obtain reliable and valid measures of human behaviour and psychological attributes. Insights into methodological issues related to the study of psychological phenomena in applied contexts are gained through having students carry out simple research projects in the context of a laboratory.

Note(s):
For students in Arts.
A required course for the students electing a B.A. in Psychology
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 5
Credit(s):
1

PSE213 Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences

This course introduces the use of statistical concepts in the behavioural sciences. Students will learn about such concepts as measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, and the normal distribution. Hypothesis testing will be introduced along with statistical tests for independent and related samples. The course will also include a brief introduction to non-parametric statistics.

Note(s):
This course is intended only for students wishing to do a Major, Minor, or a Concentration in Psychology.
A required course for the students electing a B.A. in Psychology.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Exclusion(s):
BAE242 and ECE242
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE236 Cognition and Learning

This course is concerned with the basic mental processes involved in learning and information processing. Topics include the basic and fundamental processes involved in learning and in cognition, including mind design, cognitive aspect of learning theories, attention, short-term and long-term memory, and higher mental processes of knowledge and language. The course incorporates three in-class laboratory exercises. Each lab includes running an assigned experiment, subsequent data collection and analysis, and write up as an experimental study using APA format. Students will use concepts of decision-making to analyze military situations.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Note(s):
A required course for the students electing a B.A. in Psychology
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE240 Personality

This course is intended to introduce students to theory and research in personality. Students will review various theoretical models, the historical context in which they were developed, and how empirical research has informed these theories and been informed by these theories. The course will provide a broad overview of several major theories of personality, including psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, social/life-span, humanistic, trait theories and cognitive/behavioural perspectives, and will examine both classic and current ideas about the nature and function of personality. Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the basic concepts and principles of each theoretical perspective, be able to relate the personality theories to their own development, characteristics, and behaviours, and be able to apply the theories to others' lives in order to better understand their personalities and experiences.

Note(s):
A required course for the students electing a B.A. in Psychology.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Course 300-399

PSE301 Organizational Behaviour and Leadership

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic theories, concepts, and skills related to organizational behaviour and effective leadership. Students will examine how individuals in organizations, groups in organizations, and organizational processes can be impacted by leaders in order to enhance organizational effectiveness. A special emphasis is placed on how leaders can use their knowledge and understanding of organizational behaviour to improve performance and increase the well-being of members. Major topics include motivation theories and applications, diagnosing performance discrepancies, performance feedback, power and influence, leadership theories and applications, organizational culture, organizational structure, and overall change strategies. Part of the material will be presented in a didactic form. A number of individual and group exercises will be used as a supplementary learning tool to reinforce class lectures and assigned readings. Student class participation is highly encouraged.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
Restrictions for ROTP and RETP: This course is for students who have completed 16 credits or equivalent or with the permission of the department head.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

PSE302 Brain and Behaviour

This course introduces the scientific study of how the brain relates to behaviour. The content falls in three areas: a) an examination of neurons, neurotransmitters, and how individual nerves work and communicate with other structures; b) a description of sensory and motor systems; and c) a summary of how the nervous system controls various aspects of behaviour and mental processes, such as learning, memory, motivation, emotion, aggression and cognition.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE312 Applied Military Psychology

The course gives students the opportunity to examine the psychological dimensions of military operations. The course begins with an overview of the field of military psychology and then focuses on selected topics like military socialization, combat stress, sleep deprivation, fear and courage, and psychological operations. At the end of the course, students will be able to describe the impact of these psychological factors on performance during military operations.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
A required course for students electing a B.A. in Psychology.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

PSE324 Cross-Cultural Psychology

Modern military operations typically involve multinational contingents comprised of units from a wide variety of cultures. The purpose of the course is to gain an understanding of the diversity that exists in the world and within Canada. This course provides an overview of some of the differences that exist across cultures and why these differences may exist. Topics to be covered include acculturation, stereotypes, prejudice, cross-cultural research, values, beliefs, gender roles, conflict and negotiation, communication, and intercultural training.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103 and PSE105
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE328 Group Dynamics

The objective of the course is to enable students to develop an understanding of small group processes, particularly influences that groups have on individual members, as well as those factors which determine group effectiveness. The principal topics to be addressed are: the stages of group development; socialization processes; communication; decision-making process; and, group norms, cohesion and role definition.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

PSE330 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

Starting with the distinction between abnormal and normal behaviour, the course moves to the contemporary classification system of abnormal behaviour. The major psychological disorders are discussed in detail (e.g., anxiety disorders, major affective disorders, stress disorders, neurosis, psychosis, and personality disorders). Current schools of treatment are also discussed, as well as their relative strengths and weaknesses.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE332 Introduction to Interviewing and Counselling

The goal of this course is to introduce students to counselling theory and skills that they can later apply as leaders and managers. This course will give students an opportunity to study theoretical perspectives on counselling and to apply these theories in situations that require interviewing and helping skills. After examining a number of theoretical concepts in counselling, the course will focus on the preparation and conduct of counselling interviews, solution-oriented interviews, active listening, verbal and non-verbal communication, problem solving and facilitating attitudes used in counselling interviews. A mix of psychological theory, case studies and practical applications will be presented throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103 and PSE240
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE334 Introduction to Human Sexuality

The primary goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of human sexuality. The focus of this approach is to examine human sexuality from a variety of backgrounds such as biology, physiology, public health, sociology, and psychology. This course is designed to provide students with informed sources, themes and research findings in order to develop their critical analysis. Through lectures, discussions, and the study of issues such as sexuality over the lifespan, reproduction, sexual identity and diversity, interpersonal communication, sexual health and risk, paraphilias, and sexual dysfunctions students will gain an appreciation of the complexity of human sexuality.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE346 Persuasion and Influence

The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge on the theories and concepts of persuasion and influence, from both social psychology and leadership perspectives. Main course topics include communicator's characteristics, receiver's characteristics, cognitive and social factors, attitude formation and change, behaviour modification and interpersonal communication. Also, different influence strategies will be presented.

Prerequisite(s):
PSF103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE347 Positive Psychology

The purpose of this course is to explore some of the principles, concepts and theories within the field of positive psychology, such as living a meaningful and gratifying life, mindfulness, engagement and hope. Using a scientific perspective, we will study the factors (biological, psychological, social and emotional) that promote well-being and the positive aspects of human experience. In addition, we will examine techniques and exercises that contribute to a more fulfilling and satisfying life. This course includes two teaching methods: didactic (lecture courses and required reading) and experiential / interactive (group discussions and activities).

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE350 Advanced Research Methods

This course will provide detailed coverage of key concepts and practices related to conducting behavioural science research in an institutional setting and will give students the opportunity to further develop their research skills. Students will be presented with the ethical and administrative considerations for behavioural science. By means of research projects and laboratories, students will also learn to select the proper statistical analysis for various research designs, to follow systematic data cleaning procedures, to read and interpret results from computer outputs, and to describe and report results in APA format.

Note(s):
A required course for students electing a B.A. Honours in Psychology or by permission of the MPL department head.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE352
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE352 Advanced Statistical Analysis for the Behavioural Sciences

This course addresses the theoretical concepts and applications of univariate statistical techniques in the behavioural sciences, and introduces multivariate statistical techniques. Statistical analyses covered include factorial analysis of variance, multiple regression, correlation techniques and non-parametric analyses. Laboratory sessions will introduce the use of computerized statistical software, data manipulation and the interpretation of results.

Note(s):
A required course for students electing a B.A. Honours in Psychology or by permission of the MPL department head.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE213 and PSE214
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 5
Credit(s):
1

PSE360 Human Development through the Lifespan

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic research and theory of human development across the life span. Physical, cognitive, communicative/linguistic, and social/emotional development during childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age will be examined. Factors that affect human development and principles of development will be studied.

Note(s):
For students in Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE370 Recruitment and Selection

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic theories, concepts and practices in industrial psychology. Students will examine how theoretical and empirical research in industrial psychology is used to solve typical human resources challenges. Representative topics include: recruitment, job analysis, competency evaluation and assessment, selection tests, psychometric issues in measurement, hiring procedures, applicant screening, the employment interview, legal issues in selection techniques and selection decisions, approaches to performance appraisal and performance rating systems. Students will be expected to demonstrate their comprehension of industrial psychology by completing projects with a direct application in these areas. References are made to the Canadian Forces personnel system to illustrate various points of discussion.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE301
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE380 Psychology and Philosophy of Religious Conflicts

This course offers a critical study of the influence of religion on people and on conflicts. The first objective of this course is to closely examine the role of religion in the development of violence in conflicts and hostilities between different cultural and ethnic groups. The second objective is to understand what incites people or groups to use religion or particular beliefs as a means to provoke violence and create conflict. This course is designed to allow students to grasp a phenomenon that is more and more embedded in political-religious discourse and to analyse its various influences. This end will be accomplished with the help of psychological theories and research, religious concepts and studies, and philosophical insights. The acquisition of knowledge will be attained through formal teaching sessions, discussions and student presentations. Some of the themes that will be studied are: war in the name of God, personal and religious identity, religious fanaticism, suicide bombers, attachment theory, and terrorism.

Note(s):
For students in Arts or with the permission of the professor
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE382 Peace and Conflict Psychology

The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge of psychology’s contribution to understanding and improving human relations at interpersonal, intergroup, and international levels. Students will be presented key concepts, major theories and practices underlying peace, conflict, violence, and social inequities. Main course topics include prejudice, social inequalities, militarism, conflict resolution, social justice, peace education and nonviolent approaches to peace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE103, PSE105
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

SOE320 Sociology of the Armed Forces

This course uses perspectives and research from military sociology to introduce the student to the evolving character of military institutions within Canada. The following topics will be covered: the nature and role of the military in contemporary society, external change impacts (e.g., technological, political, economic, demographic, socio-legal and socio-cultural factors) and their consequences for military organization, models of military service, and special problems in the military system (e.g., recruitment and retention, diversity, media relations, the family, quality of life, mid-career transition). Emphasis will be placed on the Canadian military and on Canadian research literature.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

PSE401 Military Professionalism and Ethics

The purpose of this course is to develop student understanding of the professional and ethical dimensions of officership. Throughout, a distinction is made between the normative ideals of behaviour prescribed by ethical and military theorists and the reality of behaviour as described and explained by cognitive, social, and other psychological factors. Course content is drawn from moral philosophy, psychology, and military sociology and includes readings and discussions on: the function of ethics in social and organizational life; the major ethical theories and decision frameworks developed by moral philosophers to distinguish between right and wrong; individual difference factors in moral development and moral cognition; situational and organizational factors which either foster or undermine ethical behaviour; psychological models of ethical decision-making and action; the nature of military professionalism and the ethical obligations which derive from the military social role and legitimate power; the military ethic and military codes of conduct; specific codes of conduct applicable in war; and value conflicts and ethical dilemmas inherent in military service.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Restrictions for ROTP and RETP: This course is for students who have completed a minimum of 30 credits or equivalent or with the permission of the department head
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

PSE410 Psychology, morality and ethics

The objective of this course is to examine the relation between psychology as an empirical discipline and ethics as a normative discipline. The aim is to engage students in a reflection that will help them understand the important role of psychology in ethical thinking. The course focuses on what psychology teaches us about the structure of human beings as principal agents of ethical decisions. Tto address this issue, the pedagogical approach for this course will borrow theories, concepts and practices from the domain of psychology and the field of ethics. These three angles (theories, concepts and practices) are intertwined in exploring themes such as personality, identity development, empathy, character development, and in closely studying ethical cases such as cognitive dissonance in ethical discourse, differences between sexes and conflict in values in ethical decision making.

Note(s):
For students in Arts or with the permission of the professor.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE413 Foundations of Evidence-based Therapies

The course will provide an analysis of the theory, research and practice of current evidence-based therapies. Special attention will be given to cognitive behavioural therapy, which helps people by examining, reflecting on and/or adapting their thoughts, feelings and behaviours. Interpersonal therapy, emotion-focused therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, metacognitive therapy, schema therapy and other therapies will also be discussed. Students will learn the fundamentals of empirically-based techniques and their appropriate use and will develop a comprehensive understanding of how these approaches can be useful in the treatment of psychological disorders with a particular emphasis on anxiety and depression.

Note(s):
For students in Arts or with permission of the professor.
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103
Corequisite(s):
PSE330 or PSE332
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE415 Tests and Measures

This course provides the student with an understanding of the development and use of tests and measures of individual differences in key domains of psychology. Core material covered addresses: test design and psychometric analyses; ethical considerations in the use of tests; assessment of cognitive abilities; vocational assessment; and assessment of personality. Students will be introduced to measures commonly used in the military context.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE213 and PSE214.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE424 Thesis

Special research under the supervision of a faculty member on an approved subject that may include statistical analyses and results interpretation, or in-depth analysis and application of the extant literature. Special topics in research methods as they pertain to the student’s research will be discussed. This thesis will be examined by a committee constituted for the purpose.

Note(s):
A required course for the students electing a B.A. Honours in Psychology
Prerequisite(s):
PSE350 and PSE352 or with the permission of the Department.
Contact Hours:
1.5 - 0 - 7.5
Credit(s):
2

PSE426 Advanced Cognitive Psychology

This is an advanced course on cognitive psychology. There are two major components to this course. The first, a content component, mainly focuses on major empirical findings and theories in cognitive psychology, including research methodology. The main focus of the second component, critical thinking, includes refining students' critical thinking skills through an active engagement in debates on major issues in applied cognitive psychology, such as, but not limited to, human factors as well as issues of awareness: memory, situation awareness, decision making, and team cognition.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE214 and PSE236
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE430 Stress

This course will concentrate on the fundamental aspects of the biological and psychological approach to stress and its consequences. Students will develop an understanding of the plausible mechanisms that link psychological and behavioural factors to stressors, stress, and strain (stress reactions). They will also gain insight into the ways that interventions may interrupt these processes. The course will cover the different types of stressors and the cumulative nature of stress. Concepts of stress, vulnerability, adaptability, resilience, coping, regenerative power, social support and related research will also be included. Finally, the course will include major stress management techniques, helping others cope with stress, and promoting wellness.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE301
Corequisite(s):
PSE312
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE444 Sport Psychology

This course introduces the student to the psychological and social factors inherent in sport and exercise. Topics will include understanding participants (e.g., personality, motivation, stress); understanding sport and exercise environments (e.g., competition, feedback, reinforcement); understanding group processes (e.g., team dynamics, cohesion, leadership); enhancing performance (e.g., imagery, goal setting, concentration); improving health and well-being (e.g., athletic injuries and psychology, addictive and unhealthy behaviours, burnout and overtraining). This course will provide students with a greater understanding of the psychological dimensions of sport, exercise and health, and then be better prepared to implement this knowledge in military settings.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103 and PSE301
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE450 Advanced Social Psychology

This course will explore advanced topics in social psychology. Students will develop an understanding of the complexities of human relationships, gain an appreciation for how our behaviours come to be shaped by others, and how we, in turn, can exert an influence on those with whom we interact. Core material covered addresses: historical perspectives; interpersonal aspects; personal, interpersonal and collective phenomena; interdisciplinary perspectives; evolutionary social psychology; and emerging trends. Students will be introduced to commonly used social psychological experimentation and methodologies.

Prerequisite(s):
PSE105 and PSE214
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE454 Advanced Leadership

The general objective of this course is to explore leadership theory and practice in depth, building on the concepts introduced in PSE301, and secondly, to develop an appreciation of how these impact on work performance and motivation. The general focus will be on the critical analysis of current leadership theories and their application to the military. Students will also be introduced to diagnostic and intervention strategies related to organizational development and to the leader as an agent of change. Ultimately, the student will be able to evaluate work situations and employ strategies to increase personnel performance and improve motivation and job satisfaction.

Note:
Also offered through Distance Education.
A required course for students electing a B.A. in Psychology
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103 and PSE301
Semester:
Usually Offered in Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

PSE462 Human Factors in Applied Military Science

This course will introduce students to the broad problems in human-machine interactions and interfacing. This will involve studying human capabilities as applied to engineering and design. Topics will also include the measurement of human and machine capabilities, the effects of noise on performance, and the effects of sustained operations on performance. The various techniques used to enhance human effects of sustained operations on performance. The various techniques used to enhance human performance will also be discussed and evaluated. Aids to memory, perception, discrimination, and detection will be examined and demonstrated in class. Students will also be introduced to the use of computers in psychological settings.

Note(s):
For students in Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE103 and PSE214 and PSE301
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE464 Directed Studies in Psychology

With permission of the department head, specialized study on an approved subject in one of the areas studies in Military Psychology, but not available in other courses offered by the department. The method of instruction (i.e., lecture, seminar, tutorial, directed reading, etc.) will be determined by student needs and faculty availability.

Note(s):
For students Arts
Prerequisite(s):
PSE214 and PSE301
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

PSE465 Directed Studies in Leadership

With permission of the department head, specialized study on an approved subject in one of the areas studies in Military Leadership, but not available in other courses offered by the department. The method of instruction (i.e., lecture, seminar, tutorial, directed reading, etc.) will be determined by student needs and faculty availability.

Note(s):
For senior students, with permission of the department
Prerequisite(s):
PSE214 and PSE301
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1
Date modified: