Undergraduate Political Science Courses

 
 

Courses 100-199

POE102 Introduction to Political Science

This introduction addresses the discipline, fields, concepts, and methods of political science, the ideologies that have shaped politics, and the institutions through which politics is conducted.

Note(s):
Core Course for students taking Arts. Equivalent to the course offered by RMC St. Jean, Ideologies and Political Regimes, 385-033-ST
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE116 Introduction to international Relations

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of international relations. It addresses theoretical approaches to international relations and the utility of these approaches for describing and analyzing international events. These are discussed in conjunction with concepts related to foreign policy-making, national interest, security and weapons technology, regional and global organizations, international political economy, and globalization.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Equivalent to the course offered by RMC-St. Jean, International Relations, 385-044-ST or International Politics, 385-023-ST
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

Courses 200-299

POE205 Canadian Politics and Society

This introduction addresses political culture and socialization, federalism and the regions, parties and the electoral system, federal institutions, organization and accountability of the public service and armed forces, equity and diversity, role of the media, and Canada's place in the world.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Core course for students.
Exclusion(s):
POE105, POE106, POE206
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

POE210 Introduction to Peacekeeping

This course is designed to introduce students to the wide range of activities referred to as peacekeeping. The history of peacekeeping is reviewed through a series of case studies to better understand the evolution of contemporary peace support operations. This course provides an analysis of the consequences of peacekeeping and the emerging trends in the field, including gender and peacekeeping, HIV/AIDS and peacekeeping, and the impact of non-state actors on peacekeeping.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Exclusion(s):
POE410
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

POE234 Science, Technology and Public Policy

It is widely understood that science and technological innovation are deeply linked to economic growth in a society and its corresponding ability to generate societal well-being. Thus, one could say that the public role of science is increasingly growing. This course will examine the public policy behind and the government's role in the science and technology innovation system and address questions that will explore the relationship between scientific research and political decision-making. The course will provide students with: a background on the science and technology policy environment; a multidisciplinary toolkit for thinking about science and technology policy and an understanding of the “social science” aspect of science and technology policy.

Exclusion(s):
HIE289
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE202 Introduction to Political Geography

Appreciating the geographical arena within which political life unfolds, and the geopolitical influences, resources, and possibilities that environment presents for political action, are key elements in understanding the political behaviour of actors, ranging in scale from the individual to the group on to the nation state and international organizations. This course presents an overview of the field of political geography and explores the centripetal and centrifugal dimensions of personal space, territoriality, regionalism, population growth and resource distribution, environmental degradation, boundary disputes, the rise and fall of nation states and civilizational conflicts.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Mandatory course for students in Political Science.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

Courses 300-399

POE301 Aboriginal Issues in Canadian Politics

Students will examine the political actors, regimes and issues pertaining to aboriginal peoples and their interests in Canada. Actors include the First Nations, federal, provincial and territorial institutions, and interest groups. The institutions in question are the treaties, the Constitution (including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms) and various iterations of the Indian Act. Students will examine the relationships between the actors and institutions by analyzing a series of contemporary issues pertaining to aboriginal peoples.

Prerequisite(s):
POE205
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE310 International Relations Theory

Building on the knowledge acquired in POE116 this course involves an examination of the main theoretical traditions of international relations, including realism, liberalism, and constructivism, as well as some of the key current issues in international politics. Students are expected to develop an in-depth understanding of these theories and to demonstrate a capability for analyzing and applying the theories to central issues in international relations.

Prerequisite(s):
POE116
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE312 Classical Political Philosophy

At the end of the course students should be able to analyze, reconstruct and compare the main doctrines of Classical Political Philosophy, spanning the period between Ancient Greece and the beginning of the modern era and based primarily on a reading and discussion of Thucydides' Peloponnesian War, Xenophon's Memorabilia, Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, and Machiavelli's The Prince.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE314 Modern Political Philosophy

Based primarily on a reading and discussion of Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's Second Treatise on Civil Government, Hume's Treatise of Human Nature, Rousseau's On the Origin and Foundations of Inequality among Men and On the Social Contract, Kant's Grounding of the Metaphysics of Morals and Towards Perpetual Peace, Hegel's Philosophy of Right, Marx and Engels' Communist Manifesto, Mill's On Liberty, and Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil and On the Genealogy of Morals, the students should, at the end of the course, be able to analyze, reconstruct and compare the political theories of the major modern philosophers.

Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE317 Introduction to Contemporary Strategic Studies

This course introduces theories and techniques of contemporary strategic studies. Developments in the international system following the Second World War and the Cold War will provide the context for the consideration of contemporary strategic problems and solutions.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
Mandatory for students in Political Science
Prerequisite(s):
POE102, POE116 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE319 Terrorism: History and Strategy

This course will analyze terrorism from a theoretical and strategic point of view. The concepts and the evolution of terrorism over time will be among the topics discussed. It will focus on the relationship between terrorism and war in all its forms as well as anti-terrorist methods, policies and war. The aim of the course is to allow students to synthesize terrorism using their assimilation of political and strategic facts linked to this phenomenon.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE116 or equivalent
Exclusion(s):
POE458
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

POE320 Comparative Politics

The course will commence with an overview of the many different and competing theories of comparative politics, and will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each framework. In so doing, discussion will take place on the key issues in comparative politics. The course will also explore the increasing variety of measures employed in comparisons of the major regions and countries of the world. During the latter portion of the course, each student will select one country as a brief case study.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE205 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE324 International Organizations

This course will cover the development of international organizations during the 20th century. The thinking associated with international organizations as a phenomenon of state-to-state cooperation will be examined. Primary emphasis will be given to the United Nations, along with other international organizations such as the international financial institutions.
Students who complete the course will finish with an understanding of the theory and role of international organizations in international relations, a strong background in how the United Nations and associated international financial institutions have evolved and operated since World War II, as well as an awareness of the major issues facing international organizations generally in the current political environment.

Corequisite(s):
POE116
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE328 Canadian Political Institutions

The course will commence with an overview of the demographic (particularly regional) makeup of Canada and will then proceed to offer a brief review of the historical roots of Confederation. The main component features of the contemporary Canadian constitution will be explored, along with the current dynamics of Canadian federalism. The course will close with an analysis of the current strains and stresses (e.g. from Quebec and the West) confronting the federation and the future of the Canadian federation.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE205 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE332 Public Administration in Canada

This course is designed to offer students an understanding of the bureaucratic structures underpinning decision-making processes in the Government of Canada. Lectures will focus on organizational theories, Central Organizations and the relationship between public servants and executive power. Particular attention will be paid to the issues of neutrality of public servants and their representativeness of the public they serve, alternative service delivery, bureaucratic reforms, good governance and best practices.

Prerequisite(s):
POE205 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE334 Canadian Public Policy Making

This course studies policy-making as a core function of the Government of Canada. Through different decision-making theories, the course offers various perspectives on how the Government of Canada makes choices and manages resources to achieve economic and social objectives for the general interest of Canadians. Particular attention will be paid to the role of the Prime Minister, cabinet committees, and Central Organizations in setting government priorities and see to their implementation and evaluation.

Prerequisite(s):
POE205 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE302 Canadian Geography

An introduction to the historical, cultural and political geography of Canada with a special emphasis on heartland-hinterland relations, regionalism, ethnic and immigration history, and the emerging multicultural nature of Canadian society.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE305 World Regional Geography: Europe and/or the Americas

An introduction to the geography of Europe and/or Americas, the study of the "geographic personalities" of Europe and America's major countries, and of emerging geopolitical interactions both within these regions and with other major world regions.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE307 World Regional Geography: Europe and/or the Africa

An introduction to the geography of Asia and/or Africa involving an examination of the "geographic personalities" of Asia and Africa's nation-states and of emerging geopolitical interactions both within these regions and with other major world regions.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

POE410 International Conflict Management

This course introduces students to the evolution of international peacekeeping, and the theory of third party intervention as a mechanism for managing armed conflicts. Students are introduced to a range of activities from 19th Century imperial policing and small wars to League of Nations Mandates, peace observation, and the UN system. The practice of peacekeeping is reviewed through a series of case studies as a background for introducing students to contemporary peace support operations and the evolving nature of the mandates and requisite activities that make up international peacekeeping efforts.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE116 or equivalent
Exclusion(s):
HIE380, POE210
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0-0-9)
Credit(s):
1

POE412 American Foreign and Security Policy

A study of major policy trends in United States foreign and defence policy from the Nixon administration to the present. Beginning with a brief review of the Cold War years, the course will consider such topics as: the impact of the Vietnam War, détente , trends in nuclear and conventional weapons and strategy in the 1970s and 80s, arms control and United States Foreign Policy in the post Cold war era. Also covered will be the role of various branches of the U.S. government in the conduct of foreign and defence policy.

Prerequisite(s):
POE116 or equivalent
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE413 Nuclear Weapons & International Relations

Since 1945, nuclear weapons have had a profound impact upon international relations. This course deals with the technology, strategy and politics of nuclear weapons. It examines how the superpowers and other nuclear weapons states approached their role in national security during the Cold War and how this has changed in the post-Cold War era. It looks at the major nuclear powers as well as current issues regarding the potential spread of nuclear weapons capabilities to more countries. To what extent have previous concepts of deterrence given way to notions of preventative defence and what will this mean for contemporary global security environment? The course also provides students with techniques for the evaluation of expected nuclear weapon effects and the ways in which these techniques may be used to determine the relative strength of nuclear states in the international system.

Note(s):
Available in "English Only"
Prerequisite(s):
POE317 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE416 Canadian Foreign and Security Policy

A study of major trends in Canadian external relations and defence policy from the Trudeau government to the present. Beginning with a review of the Cold War years, the course will consider such topics as: the Trudeau defence and foreign policy reviews, relations with the United States, including the Free Trade Agreement, the impact of international political and strategic trends on Canadian defence policy, and Canada's relations with international organizations and peacekeeping in the post Cold war era. Also covered will be the process, politics and organization of the Departments of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and National Defence.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE116 or equivalent.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE421 Political Ideologies

At the end of this course, the student will be able to compare ideological development since the Enlightenment commencing with liberalism and will then examine conservatism, socialism, communism, fascism, anarchism, fundamentalism, nationalism, feminism and environmentalism. The student will also be able to contrast and critique the ideological perspectives on the concepts of liberty, power, justice, and the relationship of individuals to the state as well as to nature.

Prerequisite(s):
POE102
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE425 Regional Comparative Politics

A comparative examination of the political process, functioning and interaction of the principal formal and informal political institutions, the relationship between those institutions and their environments, public policy, political socialization, democratization and 'good governance', violent conflict and state failure, economic development and foreign aid, class structures, populism, the role of the military, centrifugal forces of nationalism and communal violence, the role of religion, the nature of the state, political participation, social movements and political communication in a variety of countries across different continents.

Prerequisite(s):
POE320
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE428 Contemporary Political Theory

Designed as the sequel to POE312: Classical Political Philosophy and POE314: Modern Political Philosophy, this course proposes a survey of political theory from 1900 to the present by way of an introduction to and discussion of the main schools of thought, currents and authors that have appeared roughly since 1900 and have had the greatest impact on this sub-field of political science. Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to understand, analyze, evaluate and discuss, on the basis of the mandatory readings and the course notes, the various currents in or of particular relevance to political theory in the 20th and 21st century and to explain the relations between them and with classical and modern political philosophy, and also to relate all of them to the evolving social and historical context of our world during that period of time.

Prerequisite(s):
POE312 and POE314
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE432 Civil-Military Relations

Within the fields of public administration and comparative politics and drawing on theories of institutional development and organizational behaviour, this course provides models for understanding civil control of military, security and intelligence services, security force intervention in politics, and evolution of security forces to meet emerging challenges.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE320
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE433 Public Choice

The course covers a formal analysis of collective choice, public institutions, political competition in democracies, and market vs. government failure. Topics considered include social choice, constitutional and institutional equilibria, electoral competition, agenda setting, interest group politics, and bureaucratic behaviour. Examples considered may include logrolling, budgetary processes, role of procedural rules, accountability, different forms of democratic governance such as unitary vs. federal states, roles of fiscal and monetary policies, and direct interventions such as in healthcare and education.

Prerequisite(s):
POE332
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE434 Comparative Studies in Development

The course will provide an introduction to theories of social change, modernization and political development. Most of the world's population is affected by the dramatic social, economic, political and cultural changes occurring in developing countries. Amongst the political concepts studied are the nature of traditional society, the processes of urbanization and democratization, elements of political instability ranging from coup d'état to revolution. Measures of change and development will be discussed in economic, social, political, and security fields.

Prerequisite(s):
POE320
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE435 Terrorism and Political Violence

This third year university-level course offers an analytical overview of the current academic literature on both theories and selected case studies on terrorism and political violence at domestic and global levels with both Canadian and non-Canadian focus. The teaching will privilege comparative method and will primarily use empirical findings on the causes, actors, discourses, strategies of terror and political violence and government’s responses to them. A critical understanding of emerging forms and means of terror would be crucial to both security operations and public policy makers.

Prerequisite(s):
POE320
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE436 International Law of the Sea

This course is an introduction to International Law of the Sea, and particularly the United Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Themes to be addressed include marine resources and environment; maritime zones under national jurisdiction (internal waters, territorial sea, contiguous zones, exclusive economic zone, continental shelf); maritime zones beyond the limits of national jurisdiction (high seas, the international deep seabed); international straits and canals; maritime boundaries; pacific settlement of maritime disputes, recent case-law; maritime legal issues in Canada and in the Arctic Ocean.

Prerequisite(s):
POE116
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE437 Contemporary Regimes: States and Nations

A comparative examination of the nature of political regimes across advanced industrialized democracies and the developing world, including the ways in which states around the world respond to national, ethnic, linguistic, religious and racial diversity.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
POE320
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE438 Canadian Political Parties, Elections and Public Opinion

This course will explore the historical, ideological and organizational developments of Canadian political parties. Amongst the themes to be explored are the complexities of the evolving party system and the relative impact of key demographic and attitudinal factors affecting the operation of parties. The course will offer case studies of the most important elections in the contemporary era and will conclude with an analysis of the most recent federal election campaign. Throughout the course, note will be made of the shifting landscape in Canadian and Quebec public opinion and how it impacts on elections and parties.

Prerequisite(s):
POE102 and POE205 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE440 Foresight Tools and Methods for Public Policy

This course focuses on methods for public policy analysts, to gather intelligence on possible futures and apply the emerging insights useful to build shared visions, guide and enable present-day decisions. Students will learn about time-tested strategic foresight methods to gather and develop critical knowledge, guide proactive policy, and shape strategic plans and partnerships. The course teaches students how to frame futures projects, conduct horizon scanning, analyze the impact of trends and identify drivers, confront critical uncertainties, methodically develop foresight scenarios. The course provides tools to assess the policy implications of emerging issues. Key foresight methods covered in this course include trend impact analysis, horizon scanning, and the Delphi method. Students also learn to distinguish between normative and exploratory as well as qualitative and quantitative foresight.

Prerequisite(s):
POE334
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE452 Topics in Canadian Politics

Advanced seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Prerequisite(s):
POE328 or POE330
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE453 Topics in International Relations

Contemporary Conflict Studies.

Seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Prerequisite(s):
POE116 or equivalent
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE454 Topics in Comparative Politics

Seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Prerequisite(s):
POE320
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE455 Topics in Political Theory

Seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Prerequisite(s):
POE312 or POE314
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE456 Topics in Public Administration and Policy

Seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Prerequisite(s):
POE332 or POE334
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE460 Analysis of Contemporary International Conflicts

In the broadest context, this course considers the role of strategy and warfare in contemporary national and international society. Readings and Seminars are designed to offer students a wide range of perspectives on strategy and conflict in the post-modern world. Students will key on contemporary strategic issues relating to military and foreign affairs.

Prerequisite(s):
POE116, POE317
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE462 International Security

In the broadest context, this course considers the role and significance of strategy and warfare with respect to current strategic issues . Readings and Seminars are designed to offer students a wide range of perspectives on strategy and conflict in the post-modern world and to permit students to openly express their views. Students will key on contemporary strategic issues relating to military and foreign affairs.

Prerequisite(s):
POE116, POE317, POE460
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

POE486 Air and Space Law

This course is an introduction to air and space law. The primary focus is the international and national law applicable to air operations and outer space activities, particularly of a military nature. It also considers historical and political factors in the development of these legal regimes. The international law concepts will be instilled by reference to the various applicable international conventions and legal principles, such as the Charter of the United Nations and the sources and nature of public international law. The study of public air law will focus on the Chicago Convention of 1944 and the 1963 Tokyo Convention stream.  The Warsaw (1929) and Montreal (1999) Conventions relating to civil aviation liability provide the basis for the private international air law study.  For space rights, the five major treaties governing that domain will be studied, along with the work of the UN General Assembly and the UN Committee on the Peaceful Use of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS).  Outer space activities such as military uses and remote sensing will be considered, as will the rights and obligations of rescue and liability.  Given the legal importance of and similarities between the outer space and air regimes and that of the oceans, the law of the sea will also be the object of analysis and discussion.

Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

POE488 The Law of Armed Conflict

This course gives students a solid knowledge of the law regarding the use of force in international and non-international armed conflicts. Following an examination of the situation of the Law of Armed Conflict within the broader context of Public International Law, there will be a general discussion of the general concepts of the LOAC and its two branches, the jus ad bellum (the right to the use of force) and the jus in bello (the law applicable in conflict). A study of the rules includes their applicability in operational situations, with reference to issues including the notion of combatants, prisoners of war, the treatment of civilians, the obligation to limit unnecessary suffering and damage, the legality of certain weapons, and special cases such as child-soldiers and mercenaries. The course concludes with an examination of means of enforcing the law, including national courts, ad hoc tribunals and the International Criminal Court.

Note(s) :
Also offered through Distance Education.
This course may count as a Military Arts credit within the BMASc programme.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

POE490 Directed Readings in Politics

This course is available for students who wish to pursue in-depth research and study under one-on-one supervision with a faculty member on a topic within the range of expertise of the supervisor, mutually agreed between the supervisor and the student. Both the topic and the evaluation method must be approved by the Department Head. The topic must fall clearly within one of the five standard sub-fields of political science. Some projects undertaken as part of this course may be carried out in coordination with an external agency.

Prerequisite(s):
Permission of the department head
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
2

POE492 Seminar in Political Science

Students in this seminar course will develop breadth and depth in their knowledge and skills in the sub-fields of political science. Students will work with key texts, and demonstrate their knowledge of the standard methodological quantitative and qualitative approaches in each of the sub-fields. The seminar will meet regularly. As part of the course, students will undertake a detailed research project comprising a 40-60 page (15,000 – 20,000 word) paper under the direct supervision of a faculty member, which demonstrates their ability to analyze and evaluate an issue in one of the sub-fields of Political Science. As part of the seminar students will prepare and present a project proposal, draft and final versions of their papers, discuss their ongoing research, examine issues and approaches related to the structure, organization and presentation of the thesis, and comment and critique work presented by their peers.

 
Note(s):
For Honours students in Political Science or with the permission of the Programme Chair.
Prerequisite(s):
Permission of the department head
Contact Hours:
1 - 0 - 8
Credit(s):
2

GOE404 Issues in Contemporary Geopolitics

A lecture course intended to allow students of the Third and Fourth Year taking Politics, and with permission of the instructor, for other students of the Third or Fourth Year taking Arts, the opportunity to study selected world problems from a geographical perspective. This course is also open to selected candidates with permission from the Dean of Arts.

Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE418 Approaches to Cultural and Historical Geography

An examination of the cultural and historical dimensions of geographical inquiry with special emphasis on the changing relationships between human societies and their environments, as well as their relationships with each other. Themes to be addressed include the methods and theories of historical and cultural geography, the study of cultural landscapes and ecological relationships within modern and traditional societies, the impact of colonialism and modernization upon populations and resources, and geographies of cultural globalization. Special attention will be given to analysis of the historical and cultural geography of Canadian society in the global context.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOF420 Fondements géopolitiques du droit international

Genesis of International Public Law. International Organizations. Conditions for the recognition of the existence of individual States. Legal means of territorial expansion. Cases of reduced sovereignty. Geographical definition of the territories under national jurisdictions: horizontal and vertical extensions. Borders and jointly occupied territories. Rules governing territories under international jurisdiction: canals, seaways, rivers, high seas, sea-bed resources, polar regions, outer space. Peaceful methods of resolving international conflicts.

Note(s):
Available in French only
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOF422 Géographie politique du Canada

Study of the natural, historical, cultural and economic factors which determine Canada's present political geography. Special attention will be directed to border zones and to the question of territorial integrity.

Note(s):
Available in French only
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE450 Topics in Political Geography

Seminars offered by regular and visiting faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE470 Problems in Political Geography: Focus on Europe and Former Soviet Union

This course deals primarily with the contemporary geopolitics of Eurasia. Students will be exposed to such topics as the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, understanding the Post-Soviet DisUnion, poverty and progress in the Indian subcontinent, the environmental setting for Europe's achievements, etc..

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Available in English only
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 9 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

GOE472 Understanding Post-Soviet Europe and Asia

An appreciation of the political, historical, demographic and cultural geography of the former USSR, with an emphasis on the disintegrative potential of the "nationalities question" within the Soviet Empire, along with a consideration of the environmental and economic consequences of Soviet models of development throughout Eurasia. This course will conclude by introducing the "geographical personalities" of the States that re-emerged in post-Soviet Europe and Asia after 1991, exploring the resulting debate in Europe and particularly within NATO about the future of this alliance, its expansion eastwards, Russia's geopolitical concept of a "near abroad," and, ultimately, the continuing debates. East and West, over the very nature of what constitutes Europe.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

GOE494 Directed Readings/Area Study in Geography

In consultation with the instructor, and with the prior approval of the Head of the Department, this course offers students an opportunity to develop a more in-depth understanding of a country or region through directed reading, seminar participation, and/or a field trip, culminating in the preparation of a major research report addressing contemporary geopolitical issues in the selected state or area.

Note(s):
For students in Arts, with the permission of the Head of the Department.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
2
Date modified: