Undergraduate Aeronautical Engineering Courses

 

Courses 200-299

AEE261 Aircraft Performance

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of conventional aircraft flight. This is followed by an introduction to propulsion methods, the standard atmosphere and simplifications necessary for performance estimation. The analysis and methods used in the evaluation of aircraft flight performance parameters follow for flight. Students will be able to determine flight ceiling, range and endurance, climbing and maneuvering flight, take-off and landing parameters for jet-powered aircraft. Students will be able to prepare aircraft level flight and maneuver envelopes. The classroom lectures will be supplemented by homework questions, one laboratory and a case study.

Prerequisite(s):
MAE101 and PHE104
Contact Hours:
3 - 2 - 5
Credit(s):
1
 

Courses 300-399

AEE301 Design of Aircraft Components

The System Engineering Process and its application to aircraft design are presented; highlighting the conceptual design phase. The first iteration sizing of the wing, empennage and fuselage based on a given set of customer requirements is learned. The concepts of aircraft loads, V-n diagram, aircraft weight and c.g. location and their importance are emphasized. Understanding of the sizing process and the development of the constraints diagram are presented. Multiple projects conducted in small teams serves to highlight the complex interactions between multiple design disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
AAE261
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

AEE333 Aerospace Materials

This course covers the nomenclature, properties and processing of engineering materials used in airframes, landing gear, and gas turbine engines. Materials examined will include structural aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, stainless steels, nickel based super alloys, high strength heat treated steels, fibre composites, honeycomb sandwich panels and layered composites, such as GLARE (Glass Laminate Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy). Manufacturing processes including chemical milling, forging, extrusion and composite lay-up are also discussed. The role of non-destructive inspection and airworthiness are presented along with the effects of long service exposure on mechanical properties of structural alloys. Lectures are supplemented with laboratory exercises and demonstrations.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE331, MEE333
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

Course 400-499

AEE431 Aerospace Structural Design and Stress Analysis

Topics covered include aircraft structural layout, historical aspects, principles of structural design and the stress analysis of its main components such as the wing and the fuselage. The following subjects will be studied in more detail: the basic principles of the theory of elasticity in three dimensions, followed by direct applications related to the stress analysis of various aircraft structural components. They include the stress analysis of non-circular bars and thin-walled open and closed (single and multiple cell) sections due to torsion, the stress analysis of monocoque and semi-monocoque (open and closed cell) structures due to non-symmetric bending and direct shear, including the resulting shear flow distribution in the panels and the stringers of the torsion box. Location of the shear center. Energy methods applied to the deflection and the structural/stress analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate aircraft structures including the wing and the fuselage. Failure criteria. Macro-mechanical analysis of composite material plates, aspects of their manufacturing and non-destructive testing.

Prerequisite(s):
AEE301, MEE331
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

AEE433 Aerodynamics

This course builds on fundamental fluid dynamics and thermodynamics concepts covered in previous courses, and applies them to the study of airflow over 2D airfoils and 3D wings. The material is divided according to the two most important canonical non-dimensional numbers that dictate the behaviour of flows, namely Reynolds number (Re) for viscous effects and Mach number (M) for compressibility effects. Some of the major topics covered are classical thin airfoil theory, low Re and high angle of attack aerodynamics, Prandtl's classical lifting-line theory, subsonic compressible flow over airfoils, oblique shockwaves and linearized supersonic aerodynamics. At the end of the course, the students should possess a good understanding of lift and drag forces, and aerodynamic moment, for various flow conditions and geometric configurations. The lectures are supplemented with assignments and laboratory experiments.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE313, MEE353
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

AEE435 Aerodynamics of Aircraft Designed for Supersonic Flight

This course builds on the material developed in the study of compressible flow to analyze high speed flight. The topics covered include applications such as supersonic intakes and nozzles, oblique shock waves and their reflections, airfoil and fuselage designs for transonic flight. The course emphasizes applications of the principles of compressible flow to high speed aircraft design. The course also covers some aspects of hypersonic flight. The lectures are supplemented by assigned problems and projects.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE313, MEE353
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

AEE461 Aeronautical and Space Propulsion

This course illustrates the application of the fundamental principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the analysis of present-day and proposed propulsion systems. Students will be able to model and analyze propellers, turbojets, turbofans, turboprops and their associated components including compressors and turbines. Furthermore they will understand ramjets and propulsion fundamentals of rockets are also discussed. The lectures are supplemented by assigned exercises and laboratory problems in related areas.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE311, MEE353
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

AEE463 Aeroelasticity

Aeroelasticity is the discipline that deals with the interaction of elastic structures and aerodynamic loads. The main objective of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge of basic principles in aeroelasticity, while some typical applications are also studied. Three archetypes of aeroelastic stability problems are then discussed in detail, namely divergence, classical or coupled flutter and stall flutter. As part of these discussions, unsteady aerodynamics and few nonlinear dynamics concepts are covered. In the last part of the course the aeroelastic response to gust and atmospheric turbulence is presented. Finally, aspects of vortex-induced vibrations are discussed. The understanding of the material is strengthened via the application by the students of a balanced mix of analytical work, numerical simulations and wind tunnel testing.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE313, MEE346
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

AEE465 Introduction to Aircraft Stability and Control

This course applies aerodynamics to the stability and control of fixed wing aircraft. Static stability and trim concepts are explored in the longitudinal, and lateral/directional senses. The contribution of the propulsion system, fuselage, ancillary surfaces and components of the aircraft are analyzed. Classic flight control design and employment are accompanied by the introduction of aerodynamic stability derivatives and their role in aircraft control and stabilization. Dynamic response to control inputs are introduced, together with aircraft flying and handling qualities. Flight Test Techniques are introduced, and overall emphasis is placed on the implications of aircraft design features to stability and control of the flying vehicle.

Prerequisite(s):
AEE261, MEE311
Corequisite(s):
MEE443
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

AEE467 Rotary Wing Aircraft

This course examines attributes and characteristics of rotary wing aircraft which are capable of vertical takeoff and landing and which utilize the rotor to produce forward thrust. Topics include hovering, horizontal and vertical flight, actuator disc and blade element theories of rotor performance, flow patterns (including ground effect) in various flight regimes, rotor dynamics and control, autorotation, tail rotor aerodynamics and gyroscopic effects, single rotor helicopter performance. Other topics include methods for evaluation of power requirements and fuel consumption, and analysis of simple missions.

Prerequisite(s):
MEE311, MEE346
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

AEE471 Capstone Aeronautical Engineering Design Project

This course requires the students to prepare a conceptual aircraft design over the course of their fourth year in a team environment. A unique and operationally relevant and realistic aircraft role is defined each year. The overall design is conducted in teams working in sub-groups such as aerodynamics, aircraft structures, and propulsion. Leadership within the design teams is emphasized. Individual work includes the preparation of design reports, and the formal review of the design reports of other team members. The design study culminates with a thorough final report and a public presentation incorporating components from the subgroups, both of which are evaluated.

Prerequisite(s):
AEE301 and 7 Credits at the 300-level from Mechanical and/or Aeronautical Engineering
Contact Hours:
0 - 2 - 2 (Fall Term)
Contact Hours:
0 - 5 - 5 (Winter Term)
Credit(s):
1.5

AEE491 Maintenance Management

This course investigates the requirements, design and implementation of effective aircraft maintenance programs. Topics include the objectives of a maintenance plan in meeting the requirements of operational and technical airworthiness; various elements of maintenance plan development; and considerations for effective implementation of preventive maintenance programs. Detailed reviews of component lifting methodologies, preventive maintenance concepts such as failure analysis, condition-centered and reliability centered maintenance, logic driven maintenance scheduling, and level of repair analysis methodologies are supplemented by case study assignments.

Prerequisite(s):
MAE209, AEE301 or MEE301
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1
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