Graduate Programmes in Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautical Engineering

Programme Information

Course Descriptions

Contact

Telephone
613-541-6000 ext. 6369
Fax
613-542-8612
Web Page
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
 

General Information

Programmes Offered

The department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers Master's and PhD degree programmes in Mechanical Engineering and a Master's degree programme Aeronautical Engineering. Specific research interests of faculty members are described in the department and faculty member's web pages.

Admission

Candidates for the degrees Masters of Engineering (MEng), Masters of Applied Sciences (MASc) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) will be admitted under the general admission requirements. Details regarding admission to the Royal Military College as a graduate student can be found in the Admission to Graduate Studies section of this calendar

Programme Requirements

Important: All students must complete the zero-credit course AI500: Academic Integrity or an equivalent course by the end of their first term of study.
 

The Masters of Engineering degree is comprised of eight term courses at the graduate level plus a project. The Masters of Applied Science degree will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of five term courses, at the graduate level, plus a thesis. However, for the Master's programme in Aeronautical Engineering, two of these courses must normally be of an Aeronautical Engineering subject (AE designation) or equivalent.

The Doctoral degree in Mechanical Engineering will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of eight courses at the graduate level in addition to a thesis. Graduate courses taken during a Master's degree programme may be included in the eight courses.

Course Descriptions

ME511 Advanced Engineering Data Analysis and Experimental Design

This course examines the practical use of a variety of statistical techniques, including least squares analysis, factor analysis, and analysis of variance to analyze engineering data. Emphasis is placed on how to use quantitative measures to design experiments to extract the maximum amount of information from the minimum number of experiments. Case studies relevant to the students will be examined.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME513 Fluid Dynamics - Viscous Flow

Advanced topics in fluid mechanics. Basic continuum mechanics, analysis of the stress and velocity gradient tensors, vorticity, introduction to the theory of transition and turbulence. Evaluation is based on assignments, one final exam and a student review (written and presented by student) of selected current scientific publications.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME519 Boundary Layer Theory

The main topics covered in this course are: (1) fundamental equations of viscous flow; continuity, Navier-Stokes equations (momentum), energy and vorticity; (2) Unsteady flows, suction flows and stagnation point flows; (3) Incompressible, laminar boundary layers; integral analysis, boundary-layer equations, approximate methods for boundary-layer equations, Karman-Pohlhausen method for flow over a flat plate, Karmen-Pohlhausen method for non-zero pressure gradient flows, laminar separation; (4) Transition to turbulence and hydrodynamic stability theory; (5) Incompressible, turbulent flow; Reynolds equations, turbulent boundary layers, turbulence modeling, pressure gradients and separation; (6) Shear flows; free jets, wakes and mixing layers; (7) Overview of the effects of compressibility on laminar and turbulent boundary layers and consequences in aerodynamics.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME523 Biomechanics of human movement

In this course, the biomechanics of human movement is defined as the mechanics and biophysics of the musculoskeletal system as it pertains to the performance of any movement skill. Among the topics covered, one finds the introduction to biomechanics, 2D kinematics of human body, anthropometry, 2D kinetics of the human body, mechanical work-energy-power, 3D kinematics and kinetics, human movement analysis, muscle mechanics and electromyography.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME529 Convective Heat Transfer

This course reviews the fundamental laws governing forced, natural and mixed convection heat transfer processes in laminar and turbulent flows. Both the macroscopic and the differential approaches are explored. The non-dimensional parameters controlling these transport processes are evidenced and their practical implications are discussed. Analytically derived exact solutions, semi-empirical correlations and numerically calculated solutions are presented for the momentum and heat transfer rates in different configurations. The course also introduces chemical species diffusion phenomena in flows, including the heat and mass transfer analogy and the calculation of non-dimensional mass transfer rates.

The lectures are supplemented by problems, laboratory experiments and projects that will involve mathematical hand derivations, literature research, as well as the use of CFD software.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME531 Stress Analysis of Composite Materials

This course considers a matrix approach to the macromechanical analysis of composite materials. Topics included are: properties of an orthotropic lamina, stress analysis of laminated composites, failure criteria and design of composite materials, buckling of laminated plates and shells. Lectures - 3 periods per week (one term)

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME535 Fatigue and Fracture Behaviour of Materials

Stress-strain relationships, cyclic material behaviour, Masing's model and Neuber's rule are reviewed. Fatigue mechanisms, cumulative damage analysis, cycle counting techniques and fatigue life prediction are investigated with an emphasis on metals. Stress concentration and surface finish effects, computer simulation and analysis of fatigue behaviour are included. Principles of fracture mechanics including stress intensity factors, crack growth relationships, fracture toughness and failure mechanisms are studied. Many design applications and examples are given and commercial software is used for analysis. The lectures are supplemented with laboratory exercises and demonstrations.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (One Term)
Prerequisite(s): MEE331 and MEE333 or equivalents
Credit(s):
1

ME539 Mechanical Behaviour of Advanced Materials

This course covers the structure and mechanical behaviour of engineering materials with emphasis on plastics, ceramics, composites, specialty alloys, carbon and smart materials. The mechanical properties, uses, manufacturing and processing are outlined together with the effects of temperature, environment, failure mechanisms and prevention. The lecture material is supplemented by laboratory exercises and demonstrations.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Prerequisite(s):
MEE333 or equivalent
Credit(s):
1

ME541 Mechanical Vibration

A second course designed to follow-up an undergraduate course in Systems Dynamics and/or Mechanical Vibration. Systems with two degrees of freedom are used to review basic principles and methods. The concepts are then extended to multi-degree-of-freedom systems, to continuous systems and to the use of numerical methods of solution. Lagrange's method is introduced (or reviewed, depending on the candidates) and used in formulating more complex problems. An introduction to finite elements completes the course.

Lectures are supplemented by problems, modelling assignments and computational assignments requiring the digital computer.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME547 Advanced Finite Element Analysis

This course covers linear and non-linear structural finite element analysis with the focus being on practical applications. Topics include element stiffness matrices, shape functions, geometric non-linearity, material plasticity, and contact. Practical finite element modeling will be taught using commercial software, lectures on practical modeling aspects, and case studies. The students will complete a series of linear and non-linear analyses covering additional topics such as modeling in different dimensions, symmetry, mesh convergence, model validation and parametric studies.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Lab:
2 hour lab period per week
Credit(s):
1

ME549 Tribology

This course is concerned with the study of interacting surfaces in relative motion. Among the topics considered are: surface topography, contact mechanics, theories of friction, wear processes, surface coatings, boundary lubrication, hydrodynamic lubrication, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, bearing design, experimental methods. Emphasis is placed on the tribological solution of a wide range of engineering problems and applications.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME551 State-space Control

This course is an introduction to state-space analysis and control. The materials covered include the following topics: State-space representation of physical systems, relation between transfer function and state-space, controllability and observability, pole placement, optimal control, parameter estimation and observer design, and advanced topics in modern control applications. In this course the software MATLAB/SIMULINK is intensively used.

Prerequisite:
Laplace transforms System modelling, Stability analysis of closed loop feedback systems and control system design based on transfer function models.
Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME555 Combustion Processes

This course introduces the physical and chemical concepts involved in combustion systems. Among the topics considered are: chemical equilibrium, kinetics of combustion reactions, flame structure and propagation, ignition, stabilization and blowout, and explosion and fire hazards. The combustion characteristics of gas turbines, Diesel and spark-ignition engines are briefly examined to illustrate the basic concepts. The lectures are supplemented by problems and by laboratory exercises.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME563 Nonlinear Systems and Control

This course discusses classical and modern methods related to nonlinear system and control analysis and design; such as: Nonlinear modelization and Phenomena, Phase Portraits, Equilibria, Comparison Principle, Theory of Lyapunov Stability with applications, Input-Output stability, Small Gain theorem, Passivity, Feedback Linearization, Lyapunov-based Nonlinear Control, and Backstepping. Examples involving electromechanical and pneumatic dynamics and robotic systems will be studied numerically and experimentally using the MATLAB/SIMULINK software.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME565 Experimental Approach to Turbulence in Fluid flows and Heat Transfer

Turbulence in fluid flows is approached experimentally with the use of measurement techniques and methods to characterize its parameters and impact in fluid flows. Fundamental aspects of turbulence in viscous flows and heat transfer are studied and determined experimentally. Homogeneous and shear turbulent flows are studied and described using experimental data and turbulence theory. Coherent structures are introduced and characterized using experimental data obtained in turbulent flows. Students are trained to the use of experimental techniques such Hot and Cold Wire Anemometry; they learn and use data acquisition and signal processing methods. A laboratory project allows them to use the knowledge acquired to conduct an experiment in a turbulent flow and present the results with a comparison to the theory of turbulence. Uncertainty analysis is also conducted and used to discuss the results.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one period in class, 2 periods in the Lab) (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME585 Seminar

This course is a requirement to enhance the multidisciplinary opportunities and develop communication skills for candidates in a Masters or a Doctoral programme in Mechanical Engineering or Aeronautical Engineering. The students are required to attend the seminars given in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering by invited faculty, researchers, in addition to graduate students. Each graduate student will be required to give one presentation during the course.

Note(s):
A compulsory course that is offered annually.
Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
0

ME591 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering

The course consists of the study and discussion of current research or an advanced topic available due to special circumstances. Topics are subject to change with requirements of the professors in the department.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME593 Flow Stability Theory

This course introduces the method used in analyzing the stability of the fluid motion with respect to infinitesimal disturbances, together with some of the most representative experimental and analytical results. We will talk about the mathematical analysis and physical mechanism of thermal instability, centrifugal instability, and parallel shear flow instability. This course will start with brief reviews on linear systems, wave physics, and Fourier transform. After these preparations we will discuss the general aspects of linear stability theory using the example of Lorenz Equation. This introduction is followed by detailed analysis of the Benard problem, double diffusive free convection, the Taylor problem, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. From there we proceed to discuss topics related to the problem of parallel shear flow instability such as Howard's semicircle theorem, Squire's theorem, the Orr-Sommerfeld equation, Rayleigh's theorem and Fjortoft's theorem. We will give concrete examples such as the stabilities of mixing layer, Poiseuille flow, and plane Couette flow. In the later part of the course we will place emphasis on discussing the stability and transition of the flat plate boundary layer, covering topics such as the Tollmien-Schlichting wave and related classical experimental work.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME595 Plasma Science and Engineering

Plasmas are composed of a neutral fluid and charged particles and display unique properties as a result of external or induced fields and particle collisions. This course examines the fundamental processes and important mechanisms occurring in partially ionized plasmas. The particle evolution will be described by the Boltzmann equation and its moments and will explore both kinetic and fluid models of plasma behaviour. The course details how the unique and fundamental processes translate into existing and future engineering applications including material synthesis and modification, semiconductor and plasma-assisted microelectronics processing, micro/nanotechnology and advanced electric propulsion for spacecraft.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

ME597 Robot mechanics

This course covers some advanced topics in the area of robotics with an emphasis on kinematics. Topics covered include the representation of rotations, the solution of the forward and inverse kinematic problems as well as the singularity analysis of serial and parallel mechanisms, the computation of kinematic dexterity, workspace determination, the trajectory planning of redundant mechanisms, the kinematic and static analysis of variable topology mechanisms and an introduction to position, force and hybrid robot control.
The course is given in the form of weekly reading assignments followed by group discussions (2 periods per week reserved for discussions).

Lectures:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE501 Robust Control

This course presents a scope on the analysis and design of advanced techniques for optimal and robust control systems. It is a straightforward extension of classical control theory and shows how optimization‐based control (robust control and optimal control) methods can be suited to actual engineering problems. Some Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) based approaches; which are very popular in the study of control systems; are introduced. The LMI methods have deep connections with control aspects (state feedback vs. output feedback, stabilization, robustness and multi‐objective optimization). Various examples involving aircraft, helicopter, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) models as well as robotic systems will be the "key vehicle" for the implementation purposes (problems/projects) using MATLAB/SIMULINK software and a 2D flight simulator experiment consisting of a helicopter model mounted on a fixed base.

Lectures:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE503 Fundamentals of Aeroelasticity

Aeroelasticity is the discipline that deals with the interaction of elastic structures and aerodynamic loads. The main objective of this course is to provide the student with knowledge of fundamental principles in aeroelasticity; some typical applications are also discussed. A short review of dynamical systems is first undertaken, followed by an introduction to basic aeroelastic concepts. Three archetypes of aeroelastic stability problems are then discussed in detail, namely divergence, classical or coupled flutter and stall flutter. As part of these discussions, unsteady aerodynamics and relevant nonlinear dynamics concepts are covered. In the last part of the course the aeroelastic response to gust and atmospheric turbulence is presented. Finally, aspects of vortex-induced vibrations are discussed. The understanding of the material is strengthened via the application by the students of a balanced mix of analytical work, numerical simulations and wind tunnel testing.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE505 Advanced Design and Optimization of Engineering Systems

Paradigms for designing open-ended, complex and novel aerospace engineering problems demanding innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship are defined in contexts of industry, society, economics, etc... Solutions must consider requirement specifications, properties of systems, candidate alternative solutions in conceptual design, layout design and details, manufacturing plan, acceptance requirements, maintenance plan, etc.., and define processes and products, components and machine elements. Advanced solution processes and methods and relationships to other methodologies and best industrial practices are established. Optimal solution to the design paradigms is explored using different numerical solutions strategies. Representative engineering problems are assigned and a design project supplements the course material.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE507 Gas Turbine Analysis

Building on earlier Thermodynamics and Gas Turbine studies, this course covers topics such as: off-design performance, component matching, variable geometry, and design optimization. In this course, which applies to air, land and sea applications, students will analyse and model ideal and real engines and cycles. Depending on the particular interests and needs of the students, other topics may be addressed, e.g., engine controls, engine health monitoring, and materials. The lectures are typically supplemented by assigned problems, computer exercises, and laboratory experiments.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE515 Advanced Plasma Spacecraft Propulsion

Advanced electric plasma-based engines offer several advantages compared to other systems and are extremely attractive for the growing number of space missions. The course will examine the fundamental processes and technological challenges involved in advanced spacecraft plasma propulsion systems. The course will review the fundamental principles and essential mechanisms of ionized gases and plasmas such as collisions and particle transport. Several classes of spacecraft engines will be detailed including electrothermal, electrostatic and electromagnetic systems. Numerical simulation techniques relevant to investigate the complex phenomena and technological optimization of these engines will also be presented. Current and future challenges, such as miniaturization, will be discussed both for near-earth and deep-space spacecraft propulsion.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE517 Fluid Dynamics - Compressible Flow

One-dimensional flow, normal and oblique shocks, effects of friction and heat transfer; subsonic and supersonic two-dimensional flow, small perturbation theory; hodograph, method of characteristics, axially symmetric flow; unsteady one-dimensional flow; boundary layer interactions.

The lectures are supplemented by problems and laboratory exercises

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE531 Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications

An advanced course in composite materials for aerospace structural applications. Topics covered include material properties and selection, test methods, manufacturing processes and inspection techniques, fatigue and impact behaviour, joining, design and analysis methodologies, failure modes and mechanisms, airworthiness requirements and repair considerations. Lecture material is supplemented with laboratory experiments, analytical design-oriented assignments, and numerical exercises.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE533 Design and Analysis for Aircraft Structural Repair

An advanced course in the design and analysis of metallic aircraft structural repairs. Topics covered include design requirements, identification of structural loads, load path definition, fastener selection, design and analysis of joints, material properties and selection, airworthiness requirements, and durability (fatigue and environmental exposure) assessment. The analysis will include considerations of static strength, fatigue stresses, corrosion resistance, damage tolerance, and instability-critical designs. Lecture material is supplemented with analytical design-oriented assignments, numerical exercises and a project.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE535 Computational Fluid Dynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Flows

The aim of this course is to build an understanding of realizable computational solutions for parabolic, elliptic and hyperbolic systems of equations as they pertain to fluid dynamics. A basic understanding of factors affecting computations such as discretization techniques, initial conditions, boundary conditions, and convergence acceleration methods will be discussed. Incompressible algorithms used in commercial codes are first discussed, and then more specialized compressible algorithms will be tackled in increasing degrees of difficulty. Finally, grid generation techniques appropriate for compressible flows are introduced. The course requires a working understanding of a programming language (C++ or MatLab preferred).

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE561 Aerodynamics of Turbomachines

Principles of operation of radial, axial turbines and compressors and ramjets; cascade theories and their application to design; off-design performance estimation; matching of compressors, turbines and ducts; performance of integrated systems.
The lectures are supplemented by problems and laboratory exercises.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE567 Aircraft Performance

This course continues the analysis and methods used in the evaluation of aircraft flight performance parameters from the aircraft design specifications. Topics covered will include the determination of flight ceiling, range and endurance, climbing and manoeuvring flight, takeoff and landing parameters for turbine powered aircraft. Velocity hodographic presentations and energy state methods, manoeuvre envelope and wind effects will be analyzed.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE581 Design and Stressing of Aircraft Components

Aerospace vehicle structural design extends traditional mechanical engineering design to the specialized light-weight and fail safe considerations of air vehicles. As such, traditional design techniques, philosophies and practices will be reviewed. This includes material considerations, stress analysis, conventions and methods. The course includes several component design and stressing projects, including formal reports and presentations.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE583 Design and Stressing for Aircraft Repair

This course extends from the design and stressing of components to assemblies and component repair strategies. The course includes several component design and stressing projects, including formal reports and presentations.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE585 Seminar

This course is a requirement to enhance the multidisciplinary opportunities and develop communication skills for candidates in a Masters or a Doctoral programme in Mechanical Engineering or Aeronautical Engineering. The students are required to attend the seminars given in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering by invited faculty, researchers, in addition to graduate students. Each graduate student will be required to give one presentation during the course.

Note(s):
A compulsory course that is offered annually.
Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
0

AE591 Advanced Topics in Aeronautical Engineering

The course consists of the study and discussion of current research or an advanced topic available due to special circumstances. Topics are subject to change with requirements of the professors in the department.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

AE599 Turbulence Theory

The statistical theory of isotropic turbulence will be presented first, which covers the kinematics and dynamics of isotropic turbulence. Specific topics include correlation function, scales, correlation coefficients between derivatives of the velocities, and between pressure and velocity, the propagation of correlation in time, the law of decay of isotropic turbulence, the spectrum of turbulence, dissipation of energy, the relation between spectrum and correlation, diffusion by continuous movements, and diffusion in isotropic turbulence. Following the statistical theory, data from Direct Numerical Simulation on the statistics and coherent structures of turbulent flat-plate boundary layer will be discussed. Semi-empirical turbulence models will be presented. Topics related to turbulence in stratified medium such as the Monin-Obukhov length will be discussed.

Lectures:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

PR500 Project

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TH500 Thesis; Master's Level

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TH600 Thesis; Doctoral Level

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CP600 Comprehensive Examination; Doctoral Level

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