Graduate Programmes in Civil Engineering

Contact

Programme Chair
Dr. Michel Tetreault
Graduate Studies Committee Chair
Dr. Greg Siemens
Telephone
613-541-6000 ext. 6391
Fax
613-541-6218
Web Page
Department of Civil Engineering
 

General Information

Programmes Offered

The Department of Civil Engineering offers the Master's and PhD degree programmes in Engineering, with specialty fields in Structures and Geotechnical Engineering. The Masters and Doctoral Programmes with the specialty field of Environmental Engineering are offered jointly with the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. A sub-committee of the two departmental graduate studies committees administers this programme. The details are contained in the calendar entry of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

Graduate research may be pursued in the following areas:

  • Structural Engineering
  • Geotechnical Engineering

Admission

Candidates for the degrees Master of Engineering and Doctor of Philosophy will be admitted under the general admission requirements. Details regarding admission to the Royal Military College as a graduate student can be found in the Admission to Graduate Studies section of this calendar

Programme Requirements

Important: All students must complete the zero-credit course AI500: Academic Integrity or an equivalent course by the end of their first term of study.

The Master of Engineering degree is comprised of eight term courses at the graduate level plus a project.

The Master of Applied Science degree will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of five term courses at the graduate level plus a thesis. Depending upon the mathematical background of the candidate, a course in mathematics may be required. The Master's degree when pursued full-time in the residential programme normally requires two academic years plus the intervening summer to complete.

The Doctor of Philosophy will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of at least three lecture courses at the graduate level, in addition to those taken at the Master's degree, plus a thesis.

Six copies of the candidate's thesis are required by this department.

Course Descriptions

CE501 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering

An advanced study using a combination of case-histories and numerical modeling to explore geotechnical engineering practice. The course covers advanced design and modeling topics in geotechnical engineering using a wide range of examples from the literature. The relationship between predicted and observed behaviour is explored using numerical methods as well as traditional prediction methods.

Lectures and Laboratory:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE505 Strengthening and Repair of Concrete Structures

This course provides an overview of methods that can be applied to assess, rehabilitate or strengthen damaged or under strength concrete structures. Deterioration mechanisms that affect concrete structures will be covered, including severe environmental and loading conditions. Approaches and test methods to inspect and assess existing concrete structures will be investigated. Repair strategies and techniques will be considered for concrete as a construction material and for reinforced and prestressed concrete structures. Strengthening techniques will include the application of fibre reinforced polymer materials. Protective measures suitable for extending the life of concrete structures and structural health monitoring will also be discussed.

Lectures and Laboratory:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE507 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design

Topics include concrete technology; a review of ultimate strength design procedures; ultimate strength of concrete frame and slab structures; ultimate strength of concrete bridges; concrete members subjected to combined loadings; precast, pretensioned-concrete structures; current research in reinforced concrete.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE509 The Design and Analysis of Multi-storey Buildings

The basic methods and computational techniques used to design multi-storey buildings will be discussed using case studies where appropriate. Topics will include classification, history and social-environmental implications of tall buildings, structural systems; architectural and structural design processes; analysis and design of components in the conceptual, preliminary and final design stages; use of computers in multi-storey building design.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE513 Laboratory Testing of Geomaterials

A laboratory course for testing of geomaterials. This is a hands-on course to give students the opportunity to gain experience performing laboratory tests on geomaterials as well as interpretation of the results. Tests to be covered include index tests as well as higher level tests.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE519 Numerical Methods in Environmental Engineering

The primary objective of this course is to familiarize the student with advanced numerical methods of importance to environmental engineering. An overview of numerical methods commonly applied to solve problems in environmental engineering and water resources will be provided. Both deterministic and stochastic approaches will be addressed. The fundamentals of finite difference and finite element solutions, linear-systems approaches, and neural network solutions will be examined using practical examples. Illustrative differential equations in environmental engineering, such as the advective-dispersive solute transport equation, will be derived and solved using numerical approaches covered in the course. Numerical models commonly used to solve environmental engineering problems in surface water and groundwater will be covered. Finally, recent case-studies will be presented and discussed. Some experience with a programming language (such as FORTRAN, DELPHI, C++, or Visual Basic), knowledge of water quality parameters of concern, an understanding of basic hydrodynamics of rivers, and a basic understanding of hydrogeology, although not essential, would be assets.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE521 Instrumentation & Monitoring: Planning, Execution, Measurement and Data Analysis in Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering

This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of geotechnical and environmental monitoring. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with a systematic approach to planning monitoring programs for geotechnical (to include geoenvironmental) engineering projects that contain elements of prediction, planning, design of instrumentation/monitoring programs, instrument types, performance of commonly used sensors, data acquisition, error analysis, data interpretation and information management. The course will provide the fundamental concepts of instrumentation and monitoring that could be applied in civil, environmental and geological engineering. Students will be exposed to monitoring concepts associated with Quality Assurance, Compliance, Construction Control, Design Back analysis, prediction of hazards and alerts. At the end of the course, students will develop the ability to plan and design instrumentation and monitoring programs and determine how to use the best suited instrumentation scheme to capture better and real performance. Common sensor and geomatic instrumentation will be introduced and used by the students in the field. The student's achievement of the learning objectives will be assessed through a series of in class problem-solving exercises, design exercises, class discussion, and case studies.

Lectures:
2.5 periods per week; Laboratory - 0.5 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE525 Bridge Engineering

This course is intended to give the basic knowledge in bridge engineering including bridge design, construction and management. Topics in the introduction will cover problems of basic bridge conception and selection of bridge micro location, environmental consequences of bridge construction and aesthetics of bridges. Design loads, load factors and load combinations based on actual Codes will also be included. The main part of the course will focus on important topics in superstructure and substructure design and analysis, including concrete, steel, timber and composite bridges of short, medium and long span. Some topics in design and construction of special bridges (military bridges, movable bridges, etc...) will also be given. Recent developments in bridges (continuous and integral bridges, bridges which include modern FRP materials, etc...) will be given. Finally, basic topics in bridge management including bridge maintenance, capacity rating, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing bridges will be introduced. Throughout the course examples will be given including those of good design and those that failed. Students will be expected to work on a term design project.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE527 Advanced Numerical Methods In Civil Engineering

The course is a follow up of two undergraduate courses of numerical analysis (CEE317 & CEE319) and is intended to upgrade the learning of modelling civil engineering applications using numerical procedures. Topics will cover the solutions of systems of equations, the finite difference and finite element method. Lectures will be supplemented with student presentations and computer work. Students are expected to perform spreadsheet programming.

Lectures:
4 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE529 GeoEngineering Seminar

Illustrate all areas of GeoEngineering research and practice; emphasis on breadth and interdisciplinary aspects; preparation, delivery and audience participation in oral presentations; the course links students from departments participating in the Collaborative Graduate Program in GeoEngineering; opportunities are provided to develop and refine presentation skills, to give and receive constructive criticism, and to pose and respond to questions. Instructors: GeoEngineering faculty, Invited lecturers.

Lectures:
1 period per week (two terms)
Credit(s):
0

CE531 Principles of Soil Mechanics

This course examines the physio-chemical properties of soils and the effect of these factors on such soil properties as plasticity, compaction, swelling and permeability. Concepts of shear strength and volume change in soils and their application to a range of engineering problems. The course will also study of the origin, formation and special problems of the natural soil deposits of Canada. An advanced study of the laboratory testing of soils.

Lectures:
4 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE533 Frozen Ground Engineering

In this course students will be introduced to permafrost and frozen ground engineering by an in-depth examination of physical, thermal and mechanical behaviour of frozen and thawing soils. Throughout the course, students will examine topics including: surface features in permafrost, ground ice landforms, thermal regimes in permafrost areas, thermal and mechanical properties of frozen soils, heat flow equations, site investigation in permafrost areas, and hazards related to permafrost degradation. In addition, there will be a focus on using numerical modelling to understand thermal soil-structure interactions of pipelines, roads and airfields in permafrost regions. Students will be assessed through a series of in class problem-solving exercise, case studies, seminars, and a design project.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE535 Advanced Foundation Engineering

Advanced studies of the following topics: Site investigation; principles of foundation design, shallow and deep foundations; soil dynamics and machinery bases; tunnels; instrumentation and construction techniques.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE539 Geosynthetics in Geotechnical Engineering

Topics include: types of geosynthetics and manufacturing processes; properties and test methods; methods of analysis and design for geosynthetics used for separation, filtration, soil reinforcement, erosion control and liquid/hazardous waste containment.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE541 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering

The topics of this course are adjusted to the specific requirements of the candidates. Typical complementary topics for this course would include, but are not be limited to, advanced composite materials, fracture mechanics of wood structures, bridge engineering, advanced treatment and environmental remediation processes, seismic design of earth structures, the effects of blast material behaviour on structures, advanced topics in groundwater modelling.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE571 Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes

The course examines the principles and application of the physical, chemical and biological treatment of wastewater including aspects of soil systems, stabilization ponds, the activated sludge process, anaerobic and aerobic digestion, oxygen transfer, the treatment and disposal of sludge, quantity and quality analysis, sedimentation, thickening flotation, centrifugation, filtration, coagulation and flocculation, porous membrane techniques, ion exchange, absorption and disinfection. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate some of the basic fundamentals will also be carried out. Lectures - 3 periods per week; Laboratory - 2 periods per week (one term)

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate some of the basic fundamentals will also be carried out.

Lectures:
3 periods per week; Laboratory - 2 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE583 Environmental Impact Assessment

The course will cover the following subjects: General concepts of the environmental impact of engineering projects, laws and regulations, ecological parameter evaluations and weighting factors, assessment techniques such as Batelle, McHarg and Corridor, case studies.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE589 Environmental Management

This course examines selected engineering approaches to management and planning of physical systems. Topics covered include: standards and criteria; indices as measures of performance; mathematical structure and aggregation of sub-indices proposed for air, water, noise and quality of life; environmental damage functions; introduction to systems planning; multiobjective planning and location of optimalities; linear and dynamic programming.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE591 Arctic Construction Engineering

Topics include an introduction to the northern climate and permafrost; the design of roads, runways, building foundations and housing for the arctic; and the provision of municipal services including water treatment and supply, wastewater collection, treatment and disposal, and solid waste disposal.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE593 Analysis in Hydrogeology

This course will cover topics of applied hydrogeology oriented towards analysis techniques in the area of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Aspects covered include practical and theoretical responses to concerns encountered in typical geological settings. Available simulation models are applied in case study settings, encompassing flow problems and solute transport in saturated and unsaturated homogeneous media.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE595 Design and Analysis for Blast Effect on Structures

The aim of this course is to introduce the structural engineer to the phenomena of blast waves and how they interact with structures. The course will cover the fundamentals of explosives and the properties and characterization of their blast waves and scaling laws. The interaction of the blast wave with the target structure will be examined in detail. Structural response to the blast wave will be studied from a single element as well as holistic structure perspective. SDOF dynamic methodologies for element analysis will be used to examine element response. Analysis and design of critical elements (beams and columns) for a blast environment will be studied. The concept of progressive collapse will be examined including current methodologies for designing to preclude it. Students will be introduced to a variety of texts, papers and numerical tools that define the state of the art in this rapidly evolving area of study. Threat-risk based vulnerability assessment techniques will be introduced as a means to examining existing infrastructure for suitability in a blast environment. Students in the course will complete a series of assignments and presentations as well as a major paper during the course.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CE599 Introduction to Unsaturated Soils

This course examines current theories of unsaturated soils. Topics include: Fundamental principles of unsaturated soils, unsaturated stress and flow phenomena, laboratory measurement of unsaturated parameters including suction, suction-water content relationships, shear strength and hydraulic conductivity, and numerical modeling of unsaturated soils applications. Course work includes assignments, design projects and seminars.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

PR500: Project

This code is used for students registered in a Project.

TH500: Thesis (Master's Level)

This code is used for students registered in a Master's Level thesis.

TH600: Thesis (Doctoral Level)

This code is used for students registered in a Doctoral Level thesis

CP600: Comprehensive Examination (Doctoral Level)

This code is used for students registered in a Comprehensive Examination.

Date modified: