English Undergraduate Programme

 

Introduction

Objectives

The primary purpose of the English Studies programme at RMC is to provide a university-level education to officer cadets as one of the essential elements of their professional development. In meeting that responsibility, the programme is designed to foster both the general intellectual development achieved through university education and the particular skills and insights derived from the study of literary culture and language. At all levels of instruction, the courses offered by the department have three basic objectives:

  1. to develop clarity, precision, and maturity in spoken and written communication;
  2. to focus attention on the importance of cultural and social values in developing an understanding of the forces that have shaped civilization and that are shaping the contemporary world; and
  3. to develop a flexible intellectual capacity centred around thinking skills and problem-solving abilities which can be applied to a wide range of professional responsibilities where individuals must take action in the face of concrete human problems.

Communication Skills

In English Studies, particular emphasis is placed on refining writing and verbal skills in the first and second-year courses, but that emphasis continues in senior courses, especially for those cadets enrolled in the B.A. honours English or B.A. English streams of the humanities degree programme. At the same time, analytical study of complex literary works develops the other half of communication: the ability to listen carefully and to understand in detail what another person is attempting to communicate. Together, the development of writing and reading skills heighten awareness both of the potential and of the limitations of verbal communication.

Perceptive Insight

The study of literature offers valuable insights into the cultural and social values of a people or a particular group, and acknowledges that these values represent (and have always represented) powerful driving forces shaping the development of any given society, whether it be our own or that of others. At all levels of instruction, English Studies attempt to demonstrate that the influence of social and cultural forces is as important as the role of political, economic, historical and strategic realities in understanding the historical development of societies and the complex nature of the contemporary world.

Intellectual Development

English Studies share with other disciplines a concern for developing traditional patterns of logical analysis and evaluation. However, because of the nature of creative literature, the English programme is also conscious of the value of developing non-linear forms of thought, intuition, imagination, and emotive perception. Such skills are particularly valuable in understanding and dealing with human problems. Creative literature is almost always about understanding a concrete human situation in depth, and the effort to find a creative solution to the problems raised. Studying and analyzing such problems develop a flexible and responsive intelligence, one well suited to the demands of leadership responsibilities.

Programme Structure

First Year

These courses are taken by all first-year students and are designed to refine basic writing and reading skills as well as to introduce cadets to the range of English literature, which forms an important part of their general cultural heritage.

Second Year

ENE210: Reading the Contemporary World: 1900 to the Present provides more specific literary and intellectual foundations for advanced studies and is mandatory for all students in Arts. The course explores significant aspects of modern thought and cultural issues in order to provide a broad foundation for students entering any humanities, Social Sciences, or Business Administration programme. An important element of ENE210 is instruction in writing skills.

Third and Fourth Years

In their third and fourth years, students enrolled in a B.A. Honours English, B.A. English, Concentration in English or Minor in English can take courses at both the 300 and the 400 level. Students are urged to plan ahead and to discuss their whole programme with the department head when they apply to enter the English degree programme.

English Programme Course Groupings

Group A: Medieval and Early Modern Literature

  • ENE303: Studies in English Renaissance Literature
  • ENE305: Studies in English Renaissance Literature II
  • ENE317: Studies in Medieval English Literature I
  • ENE319: Studies in Medieval English Literature II
  • ENE427: Studies in Shakespeare I
  • ENE429: Studies in Shakespeare II

Group B: 18th and 19th century

  • ENE307: British Literature during the Romantic Period
  • ENE309: British Literature of the Victorian Period
  • ENE312: Cross-currents in French and English Literature (1850–1900)
  • ENE320: Eighteenth-Century Satire
  • ENE322: Eighteenth-Century Fiction
  • ENE371: Science and Literature in the Nineteenth Century
  • ENE389: The Influence of English Literature in Enlightenment France

Group C: Canadian/American/World

  • ENE226: Foundations of Western Literature: Greek and Roman Classics and the Bible
  • ENE331: World Literature I
  • ENE333: World Literature II
  • ENE351: Canadian Literature: Beginnings to the 1960s
  • ENE353: Canadian Literature: 1960s to the Present
  • ENE356: Bridging the Two Solitudes: French and English Canadian Literature
  • ENE358: French-Canadian Literature in Translation
  • ENE361: American Literature: The Puritans to the Transcendentalists
  • ENE363: American Literature: The American Dream, Race, Gender, War

Group D: Critical Approaches

  • ENE228: Critical Approaches to Literature and Culture
  • ENE403: Gender and Literature I
  • ENE405: Gender and Literature II
  • ENE413: Literature, Culture, and Ecology
  • ENE415: Literature, Culture, and Evolution
  • ENE421: Literary Theory I: Postcolonialism, Race, and Ethnicity
  • ENE423: Literary Theory II: Gender, Sex, and Sexuality
  • ENE484: Post-Colonial Literature

Programme Requirements

General Information

Students normally apply for entry into the English degree programme in their second year.

In addition to ENE210, students are encouraged to take at least six other English credits in their second year in order to create greater flexibility in course selection in third and fourth years.

The programme of study for English consists of a set of courses required by the department, in addition to the core curriculum for a Bachelor of Arts. The department offers a number of courses that are required as part of the core curriculum. In many instances, these courses can also be counted toward requirements for a B.A. Honours English, B.A. English, Concentration in English, or Minor in English.

B. A. Honours English

Students apply for entry into the programme during their third year.

Academic Regulation 3.1: 
To earn an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree within a discipline, a student must successfully complete the required courses set out in the applicable Honours Programme of Study, with at least 20 credits within the discipline, must maintain a minimum B average in the Honours courses in all 300 and 400 level courses in their Honours Programme of Study, and must obtain at least a B- average in the 400-level courses.

This is a 40 credit programme, including the core courses for arts programmes, and the English requirements listed below:

Students must successfully complete the following courses: (a minimum of 20 English credits):

Mandatory Courses

  • ENE110: Introduction to Literary Studies and University Writing Skills (2 credits)
  • ENE210: Reading the Contemporary World: 1900 to the Present (2 credits)
  • ENE492: Seminar in Advanced Professional Skills (1 credit)

Optional Courses

B.A. English

This is a 40 credit programme, including the core courses for arts programmes, and the English requirements listed below:

Students must successfully complete the following courses: (a minimum of 16 English credits)

Mandatory Courses

  • ENE110: Introduction to Literary Studies and University Writing Skills (2 credits)
  • ENE210: Reading the Contemporary World: 1900 to the Present (2 credits)

Optional Courses

  • 1 credit from Group A: Medieval and Early Modern Literature (1 credit)
  • 1 credit from Group B: 18th and 19th century (1 credit)
  • 1 credit from Group C: Canadian/American/World (1 credit)
  • 1 credit from Group D: Critical Approaches (1 credit)
  • 8 Optional Credits in English at the 300 or 400 level (8 credits)

Programme Outline Tables

These tables represent an example the typical course load for a student enrolled in the B.A. Honours English or the B.A. English.

Semester Fall
year 1
Winter
year 1
Fall
year 2
Winter
year 2
Courses
Semester total 5 credits 5 credits 5 credits 5 credits
Semester Fall
year 3
Winter
year 3
Fall
year 4
Winter
year 4
Courses
Semester total 5 credits 5 credits 5 credits 5 credits

Concentration in English

Note: The Concentration in English is not open to ROTP students.

The following list identifies English courses required for the completion of a 12-credit Concentration in English.

Students pursuing a Concentration in English must complete the following within their 30-credit degree:

  • at least 12 credits in English Language and Literature
    • at least six of these credits at the senior level
    • at least six of these credits through RMC

Certain courses are required:

  • ENE101 and ENE102 or equivalent 2-credit first-year Language and Literature course
  • ENE202 or ENE203 or equivalent 1-credit second-year Language and Literature course

RMC English offers the following courses by distance toward the Concentration:

  • ENE101: Introduction to Literary Studies: Fiction (1 credit)
  • ENE102: Introduction to Literary Studies: Poetry and Drama (1 credit)
  • ENE150: University Writing Skills (1 credit)
  • ENE202: Cross-Currents of 20th-Century Literature: Modernism (1 credit)
  • ENE203: Cross-Currents of 20th-Century Literature: Post-Modernism (1 credit)
  • ENE309: British Literature of the Victorian Period (1 credit)
  • ENE358: French-Canadian Literature in Translation (1 credit)
  • ENE403: Gender and Literature (1 credit)
  • ENE426: Directed Research Project (2 credits)

Minor in English

A Minor in English requires eight credits.

Students must successfully complete the following courses:

  • 8 credits in English at any level
Date modified: