Undergraduate History Courses

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Course descriptions

 

Course 100-199

HIE102 History of Canada

This course introduces students to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Canada from the period of first contact between indigenous peoples and European explorers to the present day. Particular emphasis is placed on four major themes: the diversity of the Canadian experience and identity, Canada’s place in the North Atlantic World, the development of the Canadian economy, and the growth and development of the Canadian state. By the end of the course students should have a solid knowledge of Canada’s historical development; have become familiar with the basic elements of historical research and practice, such as the examination of primary documents and historiography; and be able to produce a university level research paper.

Exclusion(s):
HIE104, HIE207
Note(s):
For students in the First year Arts.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE104 Survey of Post-Confederation Canada

This course introduces students to the political, economic and social history of Canada from 1867 to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the following themes: Canada in the North Atlantic World, the development of the Canadian state, the development of the Canadian economy and its impact on society, and the diversity of the Canadian experience and identity.

Exclusion(s):
HIE102, HIE207
Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

Courses 200-299

HIE202 Introduction to Canadian Military History

A survey of the military history of Canada from the early days of New France to the present. Emphasis will be placed on Canada's wars and their impact on national development. The evolution of Canada's Armed Forces, their role in the First and Second World Wars, in NATO, and in peacekeeping operations, will also be studied. Term one will cover the period to the end of the 19th century; term two will concentrate on the late 19th and 20th centuries.

Exclusion(s):
HIE203, HIE205, HIE208
Note(s)
For students in the Second Year taking Arts.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE203 Introduction to Canadian Military History

A survey of the military history of Canada from the rise of New France to the present. Emphasis will be given to the evolution of the Armed Forces.

Exclusion(s):
HIE202, HIE205, HIE208
Note(s):
Mandatory for students in Science, Engineering and Business Administration.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE205 Canadian Military History: Origins to 1870

This course, which covers the pre-Columbian period to the beginning years of Confederation, introduces students to the most significant military organizations and events of the period, within their social and political context.

Exclusion(s):
HIE202, HIE203
Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

HIE207 History of Canada

This course introduces students to the social, economic, political, and cultural history of Canada from first contact between indigenous peoples and Europeans until the present day. Particular emphasis is placed on four major themes: the diversity of the Canadian experience and identity; Canada’s place in the North Atlantic World; the development of the Canadian economy; and the growth and development of the Canadian state. By the end of the course, students will have a better knowledge of Canadian history and a general understanding of historiography, and will be able to produce a university level research paper.

Exclusion(s):
HIE102, HIE104
Note(s):
Mandatory for students in Science and Engineering.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE208 Canadian Military History: A Study in War and Military History, 1867 to the Present

This course introduces students to the general themes of Canadian military history in the post-Confederation period. Particular emphasis is placed on the following topics: the evolution of the Canadian military since 1867; traditions and customs of the Canadian Forces; the evolution of the role of the Canadian officer and approaches to leadership since 1867; the relationship between Canadian politics and society and the evolution of the Canadian military; the impact of changes in military arts and sciences and doctrine on operations and war fighting; and Canadian participation in joint and combined operations.

Exclusion(s):
HIE202, HIE203
Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

HIE270 An Introduction to Military History

This course is an introduction to the study of the evolution of strategy, war and conflict from Machiavelli to the present. It will include classical theories of battles and siege craft; theorists of seapower and amphibious warfare; the impact of the industrial revolution on war; mechanized and mass strategy; armoured and aerial warfare; nuclear weapons policy; arms control and disarmament; and civil military relations. Examples of how these various aspects interconnect in warfare will be presented through an analysis of military conflict from 1400-1988.

Exclusion(s):
HIE271, HIE371
Note(s):
Mandatory for students taking Honours or a Major History.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE271 Introduction to Military History and Thought

This course is an introduction to military history and thought from the Napoleonic era to the present. In addition to an examination of the major (and some of the minor) conflicts of the era, the course will consider the impact of social and technological changes on the conduct of war. The student also will be introduced to the principal writers on themes and in military thought.

Exclusion(s):
HIE270, HIE371
Note(s):
Mandatory for all students who do not take HIE270.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE275 Survey of Technology, Society and Warfare

This course is a survey of the relationship between technology, society and warfare. Topics covered include the impact of the industrial revolution on warfare; technological developments and military doctrine during the two world wars and Cold War; the Revolution in Military Affairs; and emerging and evolving military technologies and doctrines. In studying these historical examples students will reflect on the major political, economic and social factors that inform the development of the technology and the role of technology in warfare.

Exclusion(s):
HIE474, HIE475
Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE284 A History of Europe since the 15th Century

This course focuses on the history of European civilization from the late middle Ages to the middle of the 20 century. It seeks to identify and analyze the foundations of European civilization and especially those that still shape European life today. The main political, geographic, social, economic, and religious characteristics which have marked Europe’s past will be identified and examined (for example, Christianity, individualism, capitalism and industrialization). Thus, this course will place the comparatively original and unique characteristics of Europe into historical perspective.

Note(s):
Mandatory for students in History.
Students in History are strongly encouraged to take this course in their second year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE289 The Impact of Science and Technology on Society and the Environment

A lecture course on the impact of modern science and technology on society and the environment from the 16th century to the present. The focus is primarily on technology and social change and will consider technical or scientific knowledge in their wider economic, political and social context.

Note(s):
Mandatory for students in Engineering.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
2 - 0 - 4
Credit(s):
0.5

Courses 300-399

HIE301 Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: A History

Looking from the pre-contact era to the present, this course explores the history of Aboriginal Peoples in what is now Canada, with an emphasis on the historical relationship between Native and Non-Native groups. The course adopts a thematic rather than a chronological approach to the study of this relationship, and looks at themes such as military alliances, political relationships, civilization and education, culture and language, and Aboriginal Rights and Self-Government.

Prerequisite(s):
A junior history course
Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
3- 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

HIE310 Political History of Italy, from Unification to the Republic, 1861-1946

First, this course emphasizes and analyses the main political developments of the period covered, for instance the making of the unitary state, the colonial policy, the involvement in the First World War, and Mussolini's rise to power. Second, it underlines the influence and contribution of economic, geographical and social factors in this political evolution. Finally, when relevant and useful, resemblances and differences between Italy's political history and other European states will be established. As a result, the complexity of the Italian political life, its successes and failures, its continuities and ruptures, but also and maybe more important, its paradoxes should appear clearly.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE312 History of the United States 1750-1877: From Revolution to Reconstruction

This course explores the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from its birth in the Revolution through to the end of the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course focuses largely on the impact of the three “revolutions” – the American Revolution, the Market Revolution, and the American Civil War - that the American people experienced over this turbulent century and which continue to define American political, social, and cultural values to this day. This course is a mixture of lectures and seminars in which students are encouraged to examine and debate the issues which defined this period. By the end of the course, students should acquire a solid understanding of the major themes and historiographical approaches to American history, be able to work with primary source material, and be able to combine those elements into their own historical research and writing.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE314 History of the United States 1870 to the Present: Reconstruction to the Age of Reagan

This course explores the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the early 21st century. The course largely focuses on the rise of the United States as a global hegemon and its impact on American society at home and abroad. Key issues examined include: the Industrial Revolution, the New Deal, the Cold War, the Rights Revolution of the 1960s, and the Culture Wars of the late 20th century. This course is a mixture of lectures and seminars in which students are encouraged to examine and debate the issues which defined this period. By the end of the course, students should acquire a solid understanding of the major themes and historiographical approaches to American history, be able to work with primary source material, and be able to combine those elements into their own historical research and writing.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE317 A History of Military Education since the 17th Century

This course considers major themes and developments in military education in the past 400 years.  Beginning with the introduction of military schools in 17th century Europe it traces the evolving need for military education at all levels:  basic numeracy and literacy, science and engineering, history and strategic studies.  It examines the emergence of various military schools, the revolution in military education beginning with the creation of the Prussian Kriegsakademie and the subsequent opening of staff and war colleges in other nations. Some education philosophy, such as the difference between training and education is included.  An examination of military education in Canada is conducted at the end of the course as a comparative case study.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE270 or HIE271
Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE319 Mercenaries in Military History

Since the end of the Cold War the media has displayed a growing fascination with the growing role of armed contractors in contemporary conflicts. Hailed as the ‘new mercenaries’, these actors are seen as the reincarnation of a phenomenon largely absent from warfare over the past two centuries, a period in which modern states have accrued increasing control over the use of armed force. In fact, mercenaries have .  This course will examine the role of mercenaries in conflict since the classical period.  It will comprise a series of case studies, including  the Roman Empire, the Hundred Years War, Renaissance Italy, Britain’s Indian Army, the Vietnam War, the Cold War in the Middle East, and the Sierra Leone Civil War, (1991-2001). In examining these cases, the course will ask three questions: 1) why have states or other sovereign entities employed mercenaries? 2) To what extent have the roles of mercenaries changed over time? 3) In what ways has the use of mercenaries affected state control over the use of armed force?

Prerequisite(s):
A 100-level or 200-level history course
Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE320 A Social and Cultural History of the Atomic Age

The technological possibility of eradicating life on earth was possibly the most dramatic development in human history. This lecture course will examine the scientific origins and the social and cultural effects of the introduction of nuclear energy and nuclear weapons onto the world stage from the 1930s through the 1960s.

Note(s):
Offered in English Only
Contact Hours:
3- 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE322 Conflict in the Middle East, 1914-Present

This one-term lecture course will cover the history of state and interethnic conflict in the Middle East from the First World War to the war against ISIS. In addition to the contentious Arab-Israeli interactions, conflicts in Yemen and Oman, Lebanon, and the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s will be highlighted, as well as the emergence and operations of non-state organizations like the Irgun, the Muslim Brotherhood, the PLO, and Al Qaeda. Students will develop an understanding of the origins of and motives for disputes in this region as well as the methodologies employed by the belligerents in pursuit of their aims.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3- 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE324 Selected Issues in History

This directed reading course is open to 3rd and 4th year Arts students (normally students in History) who wish to pursue a particular area of historical interest that is not available through regular departmental offerings. This option will only be available in exceptional circumstances and requires the recommendation of a supervisor and the permission of the chair of the department.

Contact Hours:
3- 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE328 Selected Issues in Military History

This directed reading course is open to 3rd and 4th year Arts students (normally students in History) who wish to pursue a particular area of military historical interest that is not available through regular departmental offerings. This option will only be available in exceptional circumstances and requires the recommendation of a supervisor and the permission of the chair of the department.

Contact Hours:
3- 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE332 War in Classical Age

This course aims to provide students with an introduction to war and diplomacy, as they evolved in the era of Ancient Greece and both Republican and Imperial Rome. Beginning with the foundation of powerful city states in Greece, it studies the first elements of Greek diplomacy and warfare. It then looks at the evolution of the military systems of the Greeks, as well as the diplomacy behind it, in the rivalry between the principal city states, the rise of Philip and Alexander of Macedon, and the wars of the Alexandrian succession. It would then move to a study of the diplomacy and war making of Republican Rome, its army and navy and its expansion into Italy, and wider conquests, especially in the Punic Wars, and the diplomacy, military control, and other factors behind the 'Pax Romana.' The evolution of the Roman Army over these key centuries will receive particular attention.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE334 Historical Evolution of Operational Art

The Historical Evolution of Operational Art will examine the practice of operational art in history — the pursuit of strategic objectives through the arrangement of tactical actions. It will look at how these concepts evolved since the eighteenth century by studying prominent military campaigns which evidenced operational art. By the end of the course students will have gained an appreciation of the ability of military forces to achieve strategic goals, the role of joint and combined operations, the impact of conflict termination in shaping military plans, the theory, planning and execution of historical campaigns and operational art, and the ability to analyze operational approaches.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE336 The American Civil War

No other event has marked the history of the United States so palpably. Even today, commentators and historians refer to Lincoln as one of the most important presidents the United States has ever elected, in particular due to the crucial role he played in this war and to his Emancipation Proclamation, which put an end to slavery. But there was more to this war. Among other things, it marked the end of pro-slavery rule in the South, the standardization of economic practices across the entire American territory for the first time, and the start of the second great wave of industrialization that would make the United States the greatest industrial power by the end of the First World War. We shall therefore cover the political, economic, social and military impact of this war.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE338 North American Colonial Warfare, 1608 to 1815

This course will examine the colonial conflicts that, between the establishment of the first permanent European colonies in the early seventeenth century and 1815, defined the modern political boundaries of North America. Topics will include native and European fighting methods, the employment of regular, irregular, and locally raised forces, the development of British and French strategic cultures and expeditionary capabilities, the early development of American military and naval forces, the logistical challenges of campaigning in North America, naval warfare on the inland seas of North America, and civil-military relations. This course will emphasize the political, diplomatic, operational and logistical challenges of trans-Atlantic campaigning, and the integration of irregular indigenous warriors and colonial populations into campaign plans.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE340 History of the First World War

A study of the nature of total war at the beginning of the 20th century, including the origins of war, the process of strategic planning, the problems of coalition warfare, great battles on land, on the sea and in the air, propaganda, public opinion and espionage, technological changes and the social, political and economic consequences of war.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE342 History of the Second World War

A study of the nature of World War II, including the origins of war, the process of strategic planning, the problems of coalition warfare, great battles on land, on the sea and in the air, propaganda, public opinion and espionage, technological changes and the social, political and economic consequences of war.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
A junior history course.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0-0-9)
Credit(s):
1

HIE346 The History of Canadian Forces Operations

The Canadian Forces as an institution has participated in the widest variety of military operations types and deployed in more geographically diverse areas than any of its predecessor organizations in Canadian history. This course will trace the origins of the Canadian Forces in the 1960s and will examine how the CAF conducted overseas operations, including policies and strategies for waging the Cold War, UN peacekeeping and the era of intervention era in the early 1990s, and the current Al Qaeda War.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE348 Fascism, Nazism and Communism, 1917-1945

This course explores the birth and the development of the Fascist, Nazi, and Communist ideologies in Europe and their transformation into political regimes. The first part examines the ideological and historical origins of their rise, while the second part analyses the conditions and characteristics of their development in peacetime. Finally, we will see how these regimes survived or perished during the Second World War. Based on a comparative perspective, this course will help to reveal the exceptional nature of this period in European history.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIF354Histoire du monde arabe et musulman

This course provides an overview of the history of the Arab and Muslim World since Antiquity. We will study the history of its geography, language and culture and the rise of Islam. We will see its components and their impact on the formation of the Near, Middle and Far East. Finally, we will address the history of great crises of the 20th century and their historical roots. Students will develop, at the end of the course, an understanding of the major historical components of the Arab-Muslim world.

Note(s):
Course currently offered in French Only
Offered in alternate years.
Semeater:
Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE360 The Rise of Peacekeeping

This course is a historical survey of the roots of peacekeeping from Antiquity until the 1980's. It will explore the Pax Romana, The Peace of God in the Middle Ages, the maintenance of peace and international law in the early modern period, and end with the creation of the first generation of UN peacekeeping operations. Students will be able, at the end of the course, to explain and analyse the early phases of peacekeeping.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE202 and HIE203
Note(s):
HIE360 and HIE362 are equal to the combination of both POE410 and POE324 and should not be combined.
Semester:
Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE362 History of Peacekeeping since 1980

This course is a historical survey of the second and third generations of peacekeeping operations since the 1980s. The course explores the second generation of peacekeeping operations during the dark 1990s and the difficult birth of peacemaking. The history of the third generation of operations entrusted to regional organisations since 1995 will also be examined. Students will be able, at the end of the course, to explain and analyze the evolution of peacekeeping since the end of the Cold War.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE202 and HIE203
Note(s):
HIE360 and HIE362 are equal to the combination of both POE410 and POE324 and should not be combined.
Semester:
Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIF364 Napoléon et son temps

A study of the man, his ambitions, his political system, and of his way of war. We will discuss his great battles and campaigns, those with which his genius marked history: Marengo, Austerlitz, Jena, Wagram, Borodino, and the Germany and France campaigns, among others. We will also discuss the complex world surrounding the eventual Emperor of the French, from his family to his diplomacy, and the political life within France itself. The student should be able to better weigh the impact of Napoleon on the history of France and the world. The course will also allow students to think critically about the limit of one’s actions and of determinism in history.

Note(s):
Course currently offered in French Only
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE366 Europe, Napoleon, and the World War of 1789 to 1815

This course is an introduction to the wars that dominated Europe and extended around the globe from the opening of the French Revolution in 1789 until the conclusion of the Congress of Vienna and Napoleon’s final abdication in 1815. The course will examine the transformation of warfare that witnessed the rise of the nation in arms (the near total mobilization of manpower and resources) and introduced new operational concepts that changed the conduct of war. It will consider these themes through an overview of the major land and naval campaigns in Europe, the Levant, and in the East and West Indies, and through the major developments in operational art, force structures, command and control, and logistics, along with the use of coalitions and of economic warfare in defeating an opponent in a modern conflict. This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of the changes this period brought to the conduct of warfare, and the effects this global conflict had on the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE369 The Diplomacy of Europe's Global Ascendancy: International History, 1815-1870

A lecture course concentrating on the major political, economic, and social developments in international history between 1815 and 1870. Emphasis will be placed upon the foreign policies of the European Great Powers, as well as the United States, China, and Japan, the advent of the Concert of Europe, the "Eastern Question", emerging colonial rivalries, differing national and imperial strategic requirements, and the impact of the German wars of unification.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE371 Introduction to War and Strategy

This course is an introduction to and discussion of western strategic thinking in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Strategic thinking and theorists in all three elements (land, sea, and air), as well as imperialism, technological change, anti-colonialism and terrorism, nuclear weapons theory and unconventional warfare are discussed. The course analyzes various combinations of industrial power, public opinion, military power, intelligence processes, economic strength, and foreign policy a country uses to create a military "strategy."

Exclusion(s):
HIE270, HIE271
Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
A junior history course
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

HIE372 The Diplomacy of Great Power Rivalry: International History, 1870-1914

A lecture course concentrating on the major political, economic, and social developments in international history between 1870 and 1914. Emphasis will be placed upon the foreign policies of the European Great Powers, as well as the United States and Japan, the rise and development of the European Alliance system, colonial rivalries, differing national and imperial strategic requirements, and the origins of the First World War.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE374 From World War to World War: International History 1914-1945

A lecture course concentrating on the major political, economic and social developments in international history between 1914 and 1945. Emphasis will be placed upon the origins of the First World War, the development of war aims and peace terms, inter-alliance relations, the Paris Peace Settlement, interwar diplomacy, the "appeasement" debate, and the diplomacy of the Second World War.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE375 Limited War during the Cold War 1945-1991

This course examines the plethora of smaller conflicts that occurred under the umbrella of the larger ideological and military competition between the West and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. These conflicts include French, British, and Portuguese wars of decolonization, the South African- Cuban confrontation in Angola, the Eritrean war, and proxy wars in Latin America. Special attention will also be paid to the Soviet Union’s war in Afghanistan and the lesser-known Indo-Pakistani wars. Students will develop an understanding of how the Cold War period involved multiple ‘hot’ wars and how and why these conflicts were fought.

Notes:
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE377 The Cold War

The Cold War had both lasting military and social impact. The Cold War was the only sustained conflict in history that had the potential to end life on earth with mass nuclear weapons use. It was a conflict that had its own unique methods of fighting, from the intelligence war and covert action to space and even sporting events. This course will examine how the war was fought between the superpowers, and the dramatic influence it had on numerous regional conflicts from 1945 to 1990 as well as on Western society and culture.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIF383 Histoire de la France, de la guerre franco-prussienne à la présidence de Charles De Gaulle

This course will deal with the history of France from the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 until the end of the presidency of Charles de Gaulle in 1969. The course will analyze the most important political, economic and social characteristics of each Republic, insisting particularly on mutations and turning points. Internal politics and constitutional developments, international relations, economic and social transformations of each republican period will be examined in a way to make apparent the most significant trends or consequences that have affected the collective life of the French people.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE284
Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE385 Modern Britain

A survey of British history from 1750 to the present. In addition to examining the course of British political history, particular attention will be paid to the industrial revolution and urbanization, Britain's extra-European dimension, Britain's role as a great power and the contraction of British influence in the second half of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE284
Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE390 European Imperialism - The Early Stages in Renaissance Europe

An introduction to the early expression of European Imperialism in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, and particularly the Spanish and Portuguese experience. In addition, the formation of the first British Empire, to 1783 and the French Imperial experience to 1759 will be considered and contrasted with that of the Netherlands.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE392 European Imperialism - Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

An examination of the phenomenon of modern European imperialism, concentrating on the British and French Empires. The growth of colonial nationalisms and the emergence of independence movements within those empires will also be considered.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE390
Note(s):
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE394 A History of China: Origins and Identities

This course serves as an introduction to the long history of the region comprised by the current People’s Republic of China. Modern China’s long history of internal settlement and expansion, conflict and consolidation, order and idealism from the beginning of its recorded history through the great upheavals of 19th and 20th centuries continues to inform the rhetoric and behavior of the PRC. This course explores these rich histories and their enduring role in shaping political and international discourse within modern China. The course will allow students to grasp the broad outlines of China’s history with an emphasis on the enduring and distinct philosophical and political themes that inform its present.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

HIF401 Histoire Québec de 1945 à nos jours

This course will examine the socioeconomic and political situation in Quebec at the end of the Second World War; Duplessis's return to power and the resulting political dynamic; Quebec's journey into modernity; the Quiet Revolution, its roots and impact; Quebec social movements, their creation and demands; the nationalist movement (RN, RIN, MSA); the Liberals in power and the language issue; the October Crisis; the Parti Québécois taking office; the 1980 referendum, its failure and impact; the repatriation of the Constitution; federal-provincial tensions; the Conservatives and the collapse of the Meech Lake Accord; the debates surrounding Charlottetown; the context of the second referendum; the rise of the new right; and the challenging of the "Quebec model."

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE403 Social History of Canada (1870-1980)

This seminar will analyse selected issues in the development of Canada from 1870 till 1980. Topics will include industrialization, immigration, social movements, reform, urbanization, regionalism, cultural conflict, social effects of war and the changing cultural definitions of Canada.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE405 History of the relations between Canada and the United States

An analysis of various themes in the Canadian-American relationship from the beginning of European colonization until the present. Based on readings and discussion in class. The course will consider the mutual influences exercised by these two countries on their respective political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual development.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE406 Canadians and the World: Canadian Foreign Relations 1867 to the Present

This seminar course examines the development of Canada’s foreign and external affairs since 1867, with a particular emphasis on the post-1945 period. The broad purpose of the course is to discover and dissect some of the broad patterns of Canada’s growing international presence over the course of the 20th century including: Canada’s role as a “middle power”, Canada as a peacekeeping/warrior nation, and its role in multilateral organizations such as the UN, NATO, and the G8, to name just a few. Also central to the course will be Canada’s relationship with various empires including Great Britain and more recently the United States. The course analyzes those relationships and the development of Canadian foreign policy from various theoretical perspectives. By the end of the course students should be familiar with the major themes of and approaches to Canada’s foreign relations; be able to understand and utilize various theoretical, methodological and historiographical perspectives; and express their knowledge and understanding in a major research project.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE408 Canadian Defence Policy

A study of selected aspects of Canadian defence policy including the development of the modern military force and its role in military operations; an examination of domestic and international factors influencing the formulation of defense policy and the use of the armed forces as an instrument of national policy.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE410 Canada and War

An examination of the impact of modern wars on Canadian society from 1860 to the present. Specific themes will include Canadian reaction to North American conflicts and to British imperial wars; the impact of World War I and II; Canada and Cold War and Canada and peacekeeping.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE416 The United States as an Emerging World Power: 1750-1919

This seminar course explores the transformation of the United States from a disparate group of 13 British colonies to the world's most pre-eminent nation by the end of World War I through the lens of its foreign relations. This 150 year period was perhaps the most eventful and most important in the history of the “Great Republic.” Between the American Revolution and the Treaty of Versailles, the United States fought a successful war for independence, expanded rapidly across the continent, fought a fratricidal civil war, and then emerged as the world’s most dynamic industrialized nation. The course examines how each of these developments shaped and was shaped by America's relationship with the rest of the world. By the end of the course students should be familiar with the major themes and approaches to American foreign relations; be able to understand and utilize various theoretical, methodological, and historiographical perspectives; and express their knowledge and understanding in a major research project.

Note(s):
Students are encouraged to take one or more of the following courses: HIE312, HIE314.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE418 The United States as a World Power: 1919 to the Present

The seminar course explores the United States’ rise to global hegemon during the 20th century through the lens of its foreign relations. The course covers the “the American Century” through three particular periods: first, the rise, fall, and resurrection of Wilsonian internationalism from 1920 through to the end of the Second World War; second, the emergence of the Cold War and the United States program of building alliances to counter the “Communist threat;” and third, how the decline and ultimate end of the Cold War both closed and opened areas of conflict and cooperation with the rest of the world. Though the course focuses mainly on America’s relationship with the rest of the world, significant time is spent analyzing the domestic origins and impacts of those relations. By the end of the course students should be familiar with the major themes and approaches to American foreign relations; be able to understand and utilize various theoretical, methodological, and historiographical perspectives; and express their knowledge and understanding in a major research project.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years. Students are encouraged to take one or more of the following courses: HIE312, HIE314, or HIE416.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE422 Naval History. The Age of Sail

A survey of naval and maritime history from the 16th to the early 19th century. The broad themes addressed include organizational, technological and social developments impinging upon the conduct of naval operations, and the course of maritime commerce. In addition, selected aspects of the "world wars" of the 17th and 18th centuries will be examined to illustrate transitions in technology, tactical doctrine, and major strategic debates.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE423 Naval History: The Age of Steam

A survey of naval and maritime history from the mid 19th through the 20th centuries. The broad themes addressed include organizational, technological and social developments impinging upon the conduct of naval operations, and the evolution of modern navies to the nuclear age. In addition, selected aspects of the "world wars" of the 20th century will be examined to illustrate transitions in technology, tactical doctrine, and major strategic writers and debates.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE424 Thesis

Special research on an approved subject to be prepared as a thesis, which will be examined by a committee constituted for the purpose. The thesis must be submitted for examination no later than 31 March. (Taken only with permission of the Department.)

Note(s):
Only taken with permission of the department.
Credit(s):
2

HIF425 Histoire de la Nouvelle-France : le rêve français en Amérique

This course studies the development of French colonial societies in North America from their beginnings in the 17th century to 1763. Classroom discussions will deal with a full-fledged empire: Canada, Acadia, Louisiana and the Antilles. We will uncover the ambitions and plans of the French in America, but also look at the actual events experienced by the people in the New World.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE426 Advanced Directed Studies

Special research on an approved subject, under the direction of an instructor, resulting in the submission of at least 2 major research papers. (Taken only with permission of the Department.)

Note(s):
Only taken with permission of the department.
Credit(s):
2

HIF427 Histoire du régime britannique au Canada

This course examines the development of Canadian colonial societies in North America after the Treaty of Paris (1763). It explains the world of Les Anciens Canadiens and sets it in its economic, environmental, social and political context alongside the other British colonies in North America. Themes will be addressed according to the historical sequence of milestone events: the Conquest, the American Revolution and the Rebellions.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIF435 Façonner un continent : les guerres en Amérique du Nord (1754-1815)

Using all historiographical approaches, this course looks at the main armed conflicts involving the French and British powers in America during the colonial era. The Seven Years’ War, the Battle of the Plains of Abraham and the War of 1812 will be analyzed in terms of what was at stake demographically, economically, socially and politically as well as from a strategic and military perspective.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIF437 Le Québec et la guerre depuis 1867

This course aims to familiarize students with the milestones, the concepts, the politico-military debates and the leaders in the military history of Quebec and French Canada. It includes discussions of the two world wars, bilingualism in the Canadian Forces, the Royal 22e Régiment, and 425 Squadron. It examines French Canadians’ relationship with warfare and with the Canadian Forces throughout history. This social, political and institutional study of history takes stock of more than a century of the profession of arms as practised by Quebecers and French Canadians.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE440 Public History

In this course students have the opportunity to do unpaid work in one of three historical domains: teaching, research, or museums. In the former case students work at RMC; in the latter cases students are placed in institutions in Kingston, Ottawa or other locations where they complete a project or task of approximately 100 hours under the co-supervision of a member of the professional staff of that institution and member of the RMC of Canada history department. (In general students should be prepared to work at the placement organization for approximately 8 hours per week: either one full day or two half days.) In addition to the practicum work the student will complete a 4000 word reflection which describes the literature and practice of the domain as well as the learning that they have achieved with regard to the practice of history.

Additional Information:

  1. Only taken with permission of the department.
  2. Normally taken in the Winter term of Year 3 or the Fall term of Year 4.
  3. Limited to students majoring in History who have a minimum B- average prior to taking the course.
  4. Students working in Ottawa must make arrangements to complete sufficient other credits to remain on full time status during the term.
  5. Students wishing to work in Ottawa must provide their own accommodation and rations. Some financial support may be available from time to time and rations and quarters at RMC are normally credited to help defray expenses.
Contact Hours:
0- 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

HIE449 History of intelligence since 1870

Using historical case studies from the Franco-Prussian War onwards, this course examines the methodologies of intelligence operations, including issues of deception, human and technical intelligence gathering, counter-intelligence, and more. These case studies will include the operations of a number of states including the United States, Great Britain, France, Prussia/Germany, Tsarist/Soviet Russia, and Israel.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall or Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE451 War and the Environment

This seminar course explores the complex inter-relationship between warfare and the natural environment from the 17th century to the present.  The course will use case studies from a number of world regions to analyze the environmental and ecological impact of military mobilization over time.  In addition, students will assess the influence of environmental factors on the conduct of war.  Particular attention will be devoted to the impact of technological change/ industrialization and to changing understandings of the environment.  Case studies will include the American Civil War, the World Wars, the Vietnam War, and the Cold War era.  

Prerequisite(s):
A 100-level or 200-level history course
Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE453 War, Peace, and Civil Society in the 20th Century

Historians have long contended that the 20th Century was the most violent in human history.  Hundreds of millions of people were killed in two World Wars, which were then followed by a “long peace” that was marked by civil and local conflicts that were even more bloody than the those two decades of total war.  And yet the 20th century was also an age of the great flowering of democracy, human rights, diplomacy and the rule of law.  Across the globe, national and transnational movements formed non-governmental organizations (NGOs), paraded through streets, and lobbied governments for peace, an end of discrimination on the basis of gender, race and ethnicity, and placed limits on states and their military to wage conflict. This course examines this interplay between war and peace in the 20th century across the globe.  In the process it will examine how war(s) in the 20th century affected the social, political and economic developments of nation states, and how in turn those developments sparked the rise of national and transnational movements and agencies whose actions had real impacts on the waging of war and the establishment of peace.

Prerequisite(s):
A 100-level or 200-level history course
Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE454 War, Peace and Diplomacy: Issues in the Foreign Policies of the Great Powers since 1815

A seminar course on the conduct of Great Power relations since the Congress of Vienna in which students will investigate various themes and topics in international history since 1815. The themes and topics will include: personality and policy-making; the diplomacy of the First and Second World Wars; civil-military relations and the development of national strategy; disarmament and peace-making; the early Cold War; and the later Cold War.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE456 Issues in Women, War and Society

An exploration, through seminars of selected themes and issues in the history of women, war and society from the 17th century to the present. Particular attention will be paid to women's changing involvement in war and revolution in the 18th and 19th century; the rise of modern military institutions; women's involvement in World War I and II; debates about gender integration in the late 20th century.

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE461 Air Warfare in World Conflict, 1903-1945

This course examines air warfare from the earliest days of powered flight to the end of the Second World War. It focuses primarily on the development of the idea of air power and on the organization and employment of air power in war. Major themes include: the emergence of air forces; key concepts of air power and the ways in which they were developed and tested in war; the use of air power in general and limited wars; the conduct of joint operations involving air and surface forces; the morality and legality of air warfare; the culture of the aviator; the impact of technology and, issues of command and leadership in air forces.  A limited number of air campaigns will be examined as a means of integrating these themes.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE270 or HIE271
Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE463 Air Warfare in Cold War and Small Wars, 1945-2010

This course examines air warfare from the advent of the atomic weapon until the ‘peace operations’ of the early 21st century. It focuses primarily on the ongoing metamorphosis of the concepts and doctrines of air power, and on the organization and employment of air power and aerospace power in war and peace. As in HIE471 major themes include:  the emergence of air forces; key concepts of air power and the ways in which they were developed and tested in war; the use of air power in general and limited wars; the conduct of joint operations involving air and surface forces; the morality and legality of air warfare; the culture of the aviator; the impact of technology and, issues of command and leadership in air forces.  A limited number of air campaigns will be examined as a means of integrating these themes.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE270 or HIE271
Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE470 Strategy and Strategists

A study of the most important interpreters of warfare from classical thinkers (Thucydides and Sun-Tzu) to the present. Also considered will be airpower and its proponents; geopolitical and maritime doctrines of war; the developments of military technology since 1945 and their impact on strategic thinking; the theories of deterrence, revolutionary and guerrilla war; disarmament and arms control and the international law of war.

Note(s):
HIE470 is offered only to 3rd and 4th year History and MSS degree students. Others wishing to complete the course must have the approval of the History Department Head
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

HIE474 Military Technology: Men, Machines and War

An examination of the impact of technology on war, and the relation of these to society as a whole. In addition to identifying the key technological advances in weapon development and defence-related fields, this course will look at the effect of technology on tactics, strategy, and society itself, from the pre-gunpowder period to the nuclear age.

Exclusion(s):
HIE275, HIE475
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE475 Technology, Society and Warfare

The relationship between technology and warfare is undeniable: from the Great War (1914-18) to the War on Terrorism today, technology has played a central role in military operations. In this course students will define and analyze technology as a general concept and its relationship to warfare in particular. Students will also reflect on the factors -political, economic, cultural, etc.-that contribute to the creation of technology and that determine its use in warfare. The course will examine the principal developments in military technology from a historical perspective, beginning with the development of artillery in the fifteenth century and ending with an analysis of the contemporary and future battlespace.

Prerequisite(s):
A junior history course
Exclusion(s):
HIE275, HIE474
Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

HIE476 Guerrilla and Revolutionary War

A study of the role and conduct of guerrilla warfare and its connection with other types of conflicts. This course will trace the development of thinking about guerrilla warfare as well as the evolution of its practice.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE477 An Introduction to the History of Terrorism

This is an introduction to terrorism and counter-terrorism in a variety of historical contexts. Among other things, it will consider the origins, complexities and basic elements of terrorism, as well as the various approaches taken to control this "poor man's weapon".

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE478 Small Wars

The course is a study of the role and conduct of small wars and their connection with other types of conflict. This course will trace the development of thinking about conflicts other than major wars, as well as the evolution of their practice. Students will become acquainted with the nature, dimensions, and history of past and recent small wars and be able to critically evaluate these types of conflicts.

Note(s):
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIF479 La guerre d'Algérie

This course is the history of war in Algeria based largely upon the historiography of the last twenty years. It addresses the economic, political and social aspects of the Algerian « terrorist » movement. The course also looks at the response of the French government and military to the Algerian insurgency and its international context. The course is designed to allow the student to better understand the impact of terrorism, religion and nationalism upon the wars of decolonization in the period 1954-1962

Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "French Only"
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall & Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE481 The First World War in the Middle East

The First World War had a profound impact on the Middle East, redrawing the political map of the region and sowing the seeds of conflicts that prevail even today. This course will examine how the region became involved in the First World War, focusing on the state of the Ottoman Empire in the early twentieth century, as well as the goals of European powers such as France, Germany and especially Britain. It will also examine the conduct of the war in the region, focusing particularly on the Gallipoli campaign, the Mesopotamia campaign and the Palestine campaign. In addition, it will consider the political consequences of the war in the Middle East. The course will place particular emphasis on competing interpretations of the conflict, and students will be expected to produce a historiographical essay on a particular aspect of it.

Prerequisite(s):
A 100-level or 200-level history course
Note(s):
Course is currently offered in "English Only"
Offered in alternate years.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE483 Continuity and Change in the Military History of Modern China

This course is a 4th year seminar course aimed at exploring the rich military history of modern China. The course is organized thematically to explore, through student led seminars, the many ages of China’s military heritage. Eras addressed include the Warring States Period; Mongol Invasions and Influence; The Century of Humiliation and the end of the Imperial Era; the Anti-Japanese War; the Civil War; the Cold War; Red Army and Red Guards during the Cultural Revolution; The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) from the People’s War to Modernization. This course will provide a solid grounding in the enduring military philosophy and political-military interactions that inform the behavior of modern China.

Prerequisite(s):
HIE394
Note(s):
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

HIE484 Themes in Modern History

This course is designed to facilitate the special expertise of visiting Professors to teach in their area of expertise. Each course will have a distinct theme reflecting that expertise and the subject of the course, if offered, will be published at the time of student registration. The course will be an advanced seminar and open only to history and MSS majors and honours students. Students may only take this course once.

Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1
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