Undergraduate English Courses

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Courses 100-199

ENE100 Introduction to Literary Studies and University Writing Skills

This course provides an introduction to literary studies through a range of critical approaches, national perspectives, historical contexts, literary genres, and critical terms. Students will compose persuasive arguments that demonstrate close reading skills, logical reasoning, and a competence in writing at the university level.

Texts as assigned by instructors.

Note(s):
Mandatory for all first-year anglophone students in the Science or Engineering entry programme.
Exclusion(s):
ENE101, ENE102, ENE110
Semester:
Offered every year
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

ENE101 Introduction to Literary Studies: Fiction

This course is divided between the study of literature - primarily through reading works of short fiction - and exercises and assignments that develop grammar and composition skills. The Course Reader comprises a selection of largely modern short stories by Canadian, American, and British writers, and is supplemented by a Canadian war novel. The course does not attempt an historical or chronological overview of modern short fiction; rather, the works of fiction have been grouped around common themes that explore the human condition as well as address concerns particular to military culture. General characteristics of fiction and effective strategies for reading and understanding literature are presented in the course notes. Grammar and writing skills are developed through auto-instructional methods that provide ample illustration and practice for each principle. Course work consists of required readings and grammar/writing lessons, four essay assignments, and a final exam.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Exclusion(s):
ENE100, ENE110
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, every year.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

ENE102 Introduction to Literary Studies: Poetry and Drama

This course introduces students to poetry and drama using examples of the genres from Shakespeare to the twenty-first century. The course begins by identifying and discussing the major features of poetic language through lyric poems that are notable for their distinctive speaking voice. The course then examines the different forms of poetry with particular focus on lyric and narrative poetry that address complex human situations. In the second part of the course, students will study two plays. Topics for consideration include dramatic structure, characterization, and thematic development. Course work consists of three essay assignments (two on poetry and one on drama), online discussion postings, and a final exam.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
No prerequisite is required, but students are encouraged to first complete ENE101 or its equivalent.
Exclusion(s):
ENE100, ENE110
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, every year
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

ENE110 Introduction to Literary Studies and University Writing Skills

This course provides an introduction to literary studies through a range of critical approaches, national perspectives, historical contexts, literary genres, and critical terms. Students will compose persuasive arguments that demonstrate close reading skills, logical reasoning, and a competence in writing at the university level.

Texts as assigned by instructors.

Note(s):
Mandatory for all first year anglophone students in the Arts programme.
Exclusion(s):
ENE100, ENE101, ENE102
Semester:
Offered every year
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

ENE150 University Writing Skills

This course is aimed at the student who is competent with basic English grammar and written expression, but desires to develop and hone critical thinking and writing skills. Instructional materials address a broad number of forms and methods used in academic and non-academic writing. Topics range from matters of prewriting practices and the writing process, to aspects of sentence structure and argument, and the elements of style. Through analysis of sample essays and excerpts, students will learn how to move from topic to technique - to apply effective writing and organizational strategies that distinguish good writing wherever it is found.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
This course may count as a Military Arts credit within the BMASc programme.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

Courses 200-299

ENE202 Cross-Currents of Thought in 20th-Century Literature: Modernism

This course introduces students to the major literary and cultural trends of the first half of the twentieth century. Through a selection of British, Canadian, American, and German literature, students will study the styles and themes of literary modernism in poetry, novels, short stories, and one play. The course studies the literature of the Great War, including the English war poets Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon and the German novel All Quiet on the Western Front. Students will also encounter such important modern poets as Thomas Hardy, W. B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, H. D., and T. S. Eliot. Students will learn why the short story is a particularly twentieth-century genre and how its innovations apply to the techniques of the modernist novel through discussions of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway. More generally, the course provides both a regional and a planetary perspective on humanity, allowing us to consider variations in national and personal definitions of such themes as heroism, utopia/dystopia, issues of gender and sexuality, social and individual responsibility, and freedom. Students will be required to write several short response papers and one major essay. Although this is a distance course, it is also a discussion-intensive course, and all students are required to contribute frequently to the online discussion forum.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
This course may count as a Military Arts credit within the BMASc programme.
Prerequisite(s):
ENE100 or ENE110 or (ENE101 and ENE102) or equivalent.
Exclusion(s):
ENE210
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

ENE203 Cross-Currents of Thought in 20th-Century Literature: Postmodernism

This online course examines literature in English from the years following the Second World War to the present. It considers such authors as Michael Ondaatje, Nadine Gordimer, Chinua Achebe, Angela Carter, Kath Walker, Margaret Atwood, and Hanif Kureishi. The course examines how international writers have met the challenges of our increasingly diverse, technological, postcolonial, and globalized world, a world in which identities have become unstable and borders of all kinds have become fluid. Students will contribute to online discussion, write five short formal response papers, complete one formal essay, and write a final exam.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Although it is preferred that students have taken ENE202 before enrolling in ENE203, it is not required.
Prerequisite(s):
ENE100 or ENE110 or (ENE101 and ENE102) (or equivalent).
Exclusion(s):
ENE210
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

ENE210 Reading the Contemporary World: 1900 to the Present

This course develops students’ cultural literacy in a global context through critical examinations of modern and contemporary texts. Students will apply critical and cultural theories to a range of texts and topics that address questions concerning global cultures in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will also apply research methods to the composition of argumentative essays.

Note(s):
This course is required for all second-year students in an Arts programme.
Prerequisite(s):
ENE100 or ENE110 (or equivalent).
Exclusion(s):
ENE202, ENE203
Semester:
Offered every year
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

ENE226 Foundations of Western Literature: Greek and Roman Classics and the Bible

This course is an introduction to the cultural, ethnic, and literary histories that have informed the production of English Literature, and of much Western culture, for the past four millennia.   Students will examine how Greek, Roman, and Judeo-Christian texts reflect the values of the periods in which they were written, and why they are important today.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 (or equivalent)
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE228 Critical Approaches to Literature and Culture

This course introduces key theoretical and practical questions which arise in the study of literature and contemporary culture such as "Why study literature?"  "What constitutes 'great' literature?"  "What aspects of culture--such as movies, TV shows, advertising, news media, or music--can be read as 'texts'?" Students will learn how to apply these theories in commenting on literature.  Emphasis will also be placed on effective essay writing.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 (or equivalent)
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Courses 300-399

ENE303 Studies in English Renaissance Literature I

This course presents English literature from about 1550 to the beginning of the seventeenth century, an era often referred to as "the golden age of English literature."  The intention of the course is to provide an appreciation of the intellectual, cultural, and social milieu of the Renaissance.  Students will enrich their knowledge about European and English Renaissance art, architecture, music, exploration, science, political figures, and religious movements.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years..
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE305 Studies in English Renaissance Literature II

This course continues the study of English literature in the Renaissance and focuses on the time period from about 1600 to 1660, the continuation of the era often referred to as "the golden age of English literature."  The intention of this course is to provide an appreciation of the intellectual, cultural, and social milieu of the Renaissance.    The study of seventeenth-century literature will include a detailed examination of Milton's magnificent Paradise Lost, the finest epic in English literature, and the examination of selected metaphysical poets such as John Donne, who revolted against the conventions of earlier Renaissance poets.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE307 British Literature during the Romantic Period

The backbone of this course is the study of the work of the six great British Romantic poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. Careful attention will be paid to the short lyric poems, and we will read parts of the longer narrative poems. Students will be encouraged to explore the common ideas which emerge in these poets' work and the differing ideas of "Romanticism" which are present. The prose of some of these authors will also be examined. Finally, the course will include the study of two novels, by Jane Austen and Mary Shelley.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE309 British Literature of the Victorian Period

This course looks at British literature from 1837 to 1901, the period encompassing Queen Victoria’s reign. Examining various types of literature – essays, poetry, novels, and plays – this course will treat texts as both products and producers of culture, looking at them within their historical and social contexts and considering how they might support or undermine the world in which they were created.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

ENE311 British Literature: 1890s to 1945

In this course, students will study selected poems, short stories, novels and plays of representative modern British writers - Hardy, Housman, Kipling, Conrad, Yeats, Shaw, Owen, Forster, Woolf, Lawrence, Joyce, Eliot, Auden, Thomas, Reed, Huxley, Orwell - and assess how they have grappled with a variety of themes: the pros and cons of empire-building, the evils of colonialism, the pain of exile, the anguish of alienation, the quest for identity, the struggle for freedom, the lust for money and power, the love for life and God. Students will be expected to scrutinize the writers and their works historically and critically.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE312 Crosscurrents in French and English Literature (1850-1900)

This course, offered jointly as a “dialogue course” between the English Department and the French Department, will be team-taught by a professor from each department. The course will therefore include classes in English, alternating with classes in French, will familiarize students, through analyses of representative texts in French and English, with important aesthetic concepts of the second half of the 19th century, enabling them to trace connections and divergences between the two cultures. At the end of the course, students will not only be able to describe the interactions between the writers of the two worlds, but also to apprehend the differences in the understanding of aesthetic movements on either side of the Channel.

Prerequisite(s):
Students are permitted entry into this course only if they have attained a ‘C’ in the second language Reading Comprehension examination or equivalent. This course is designed for students in the third or fourth years in Arts (or at the discretion of the Departments of English and French Studies).
Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
One of the three bilingual courses will generally be offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE313 Postmodern British Literature

In this course, students will study selected poems, short stories, novels and plays of representative post-modern British writers - Greene, Burgess, le Carré, Pinter, Stoppard, Larkin, Gordimer, Hughes, Heaney, Walcott - and assess how they struggle and come to terms with various socio-political events and issues: the loss of empire, the Cold War, the emergence of a new "world order," the imminence of dystopia, the exploration of space, the advance of science and technology. Students will be expected to scrutinize the writers and their works historically and critically.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE317 Studies in Medieval English Literature I

This course is designed to introduce students to the early literature of England before 1500, commonly called Old and Middle English literature.  The course begins with an outline history of the development of the English language from Old and Middle English to the modern period. Students will then read the heroic epic Beowulf, a great warrior adventure story, followed by such works as the "Battle of Maldon," "The Wanderer," "The Seafarer," Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur. Students in this course will learn that English Medieval literature remains highly readable, entertaining, and relevant to today's concerns.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE319 Studies in Medieval English Literature II

In this course, which deals with Old and Middle English literature, students will study a variety of early English literary works written between 650 and 1500. They will be introduced to the earliest extant poetry in the English language from the seventh century to the tenth century. Students will be introduced to genres as diverse as chronicles and courtly romances, lyrics, ballads, religious allegory, animal moral fables, Biblical and moral drama. Great universal works such as the moral drama Everyman are still popular on the stage today. Students will study in detail the Canterbury Tales of Geoffrey Chaucer, who is still recognized as one of the greatest storytellers in the English language.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE320 Eighteenth-Century Satire

This course examines poetry and prose satire at a time when these genres dominated an exploding print culture. In the Age of Reason, also known as the Enlightenment, “wit” was a serious kind of play with the power to build up, and the power to tear down—individuals, regimes, and systems. Students will analyze satiric poetry, essays and plays in order to identify such central concerns of the period as the idea of a rational universe, the threat of disorder, competing voices, and social mobility.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall Term, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE322 Eighteenth-Century Fiction

This course is a critical discussion of novels in an age that witnessed long prose narratives take hold of the press and of the popular imagination. Students will read and compare a variety of texts that may include travel, epistolary, satiric, and sentimental in order to evaluate the evolution of what has become the most popular genre in our own time. Problems of voice, point of view, and the novel’s love-hate relationship with itself will contribute to the students’ ability to interrogate such issues as class, gender and nationalism in the early novel.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter Term alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE331 World Literature I

Through an examination of novels, short stories, and poetry from Africa, South America, and the Caribbean, complemented by recent films, this course will introduce students to some of the major writers of the "new literatures in English." Such artists invite us to consider how we encounter, explore and engage other countries and cultures, how we respond to foreign values and perspectives, how we meet new and unexpected challenges and unusual circumstances. Attention will be given to historical, social and cultural contexts as well as to appreciating the works within their own emerging traditions and within the parent tradition of English literature.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE333 World Literature II

Through a survey of novels, short stories and poetry from Afghanistan, Iran, Australia, New Zealand, India and the Himalayas, complemented by recent films, students will familiarize themselves with outstanding writers of the "new literatures in English." Class discussion will focus on such themes as human relationships in the rapidly changing contemporary world, heroism, leadership, terrorism, fundamentalism, spirituality, "the good life," racial and gender issues, environmental stewardship, and the link between a nation's character and its landscape.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE351 Canadian Literature: Beginnings to the 1960s

Through a survey of English-Canadian fiction and poetry from the beginnings to the 1960s, including aboriginal artists, this course attempts to identify shared perspectives, attitudes, ideas, and techniques characteristic of our own distinctive literature. The writers and filmmakers under study invite us to reflect on who we are, where we came from and where we are going, as well as on the relationship between the nation's character and its landscape. We survey both the blessings and the challenges posed by the diversity of our rich multicultural mosaic.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE353 Canadian Literature: 1960s to the Present

Through a survey of English-Canadian fiction and poetry from the 1960s to the present, complemented by recent films, this course endeavours to identify shared perspectives, attitudes, ideas and techniques characteristic of our unique literature. While designated as the complement to ENE351, it is helpful but not necessary to take both courses.  Throughout this course and ENE351, we see our artists engaged in what Northrop Frye describes as closing the gap between an immigrant mentality at odds with this land and an aboriginal sensibility attuned to it.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE356 Bridging the Two Solitudes: French and English Canadian Literature

This course is to be offered conjointly by the Department of French Studies and the Department of English; it is to be team-taught by two professors, one from each of the departments. It will focus on comparisons of important aesthetic and cultural movements.

Through analyses of representative texts in French Canadian and English Canadian literature, this course will familiarize students with important aesthetic concepts in each of what Hugh MacLennan famously labelled “the two solitudes,” enabling students to trace connections and divergences between the two cultures. Specific texts and topics will change year to year but may include canonical writers (such as Roy, Yves Thériault, Margaret Atwood, Leonard Cohen), and topics such as nationalism, war, economics, religion, gender, and narrative form.

Prerequisite(s):
Students are permitted entry into this course only if they have attained a ‘C’ in the second language Reading Comprehension examination or equivalent. This course is designed for students in the third or fourth years in Arts (or at the discretion of the Departments of English and French Studies).
Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE358 French-Canadian Literature in Translation

Through a detailed study of French-Canadian texts translated into English, this course focuses on French-Canadian culture and its literature. Students will read, for example, a nineteenth-century novel, a contemporary play, and French-Canadian literature from outside Quebec in order to gain an understanding of the unique nature of the literature of French Canada.

Corequisite(s):
ENE202 or ENE203 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE361 American Literature: The Puritans to the Transcendentalists

Through the study of American literature and writings from the early colonial period to the late 19th century, this course introduces the student to the "idea" of America and to American ideals, from the Puritans' "city on a hill" to the cosmic consciousness of the Transcendentalists. Students will engage with a diverse range of texts that include journal writing, social histories, sermons, speeches, essays, and autobiography, along with representative works of fiction and poetry. A complement to ENE363, the course traces two predominant themes in American literature: Puritanism and primitivism.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE363 American Literature: The American Dream, Race, Gender, War

This course focuses on 20th-century American literature, particularly the short story, poetry, and drama, as well as popular culture: music (from blues & folk to rock & rap) and film. Through lectures, seminars and readings, students will examine the diverse definitions and staying power of the American Dream, themes of gender and racial identity (from slavery to presidency), and the legacy of Puritanism. Two compelling narratives by serving soldiers in the Vietnam and Iraq wars explore the meaning of war and the nature of war stories.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE371 Science and Literature in the Nineteenth Century

This course looks at the interactions between literature and science from a cultural, historical, and literary perspective. Since it gained its first popular foothold in the early nineteenth century, science and its methods have come to dominate the Western collective consciousness, determining in many ways how we interpret – and how we express – our reality. This preoccupation with science and discovery can be found throughout literature, both as celebration and as critique. Focusing on science’s rise in popular culture, and looking at texts ranging from poetry, fiction, essays, and drama to influential scientific narratives of the period, the course may include discussions of exploration and travel writing, representations of science and scientists in literature, cultural influences of and on scientific discoveries, and the complex intersections between nineteenth-century scientific advancement and literary production.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE375 Literature and Spirituality

At the heart of both literature and spirituality, we find the same mysteries and questions: Who am I? Why am I here? What’s it all about?  This course invites you on an exploration of how the world’s literatures and the diverse wisdom teachings and religious traditions through the ages speak to the spiritual within our human condition. Along with exploring a variety of foundational beliefs and expressions of spiritualities East and/or West, this course will examine the spiritual dimension in sacred and secular literature, and the challenges occasioned by the representation and interpretation of literary encounters of a spiritual kind.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9) 
Credit(s):
1

ENE381 Major Women Writers to 1900

This course offers students an opportunity to read both widely and deeply the works of early women writers.  Works will be studied within their historical contexts as well as with a consideration of the history of women as authors in manuscript, coterie publication, and finally print.  There is a significant difference between publishing for fame and publishing for the evolving literary marketplace of the period.  These authors were from different backgrounds, writing in different genres (including poetry, drama, essay and novel) and on a wide variety of subjects.  Their concerns included, as might ours, examinations of the tension between religion and reason, misogyny and the subjection of women, issues of class in a highly stratified society and debates that address the subjection of other peoples through colonization and slavery.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE383 Major Women Writers: 1900 to the Present

The focus of this course is twentieth- and twenty-first century literature by women.  Students will have the opportunity to read and learn about women in the era that created feminism, and trace that evolution to their own lifetime.  Common ground among the authors will be identified, but so too will divergence and dispute among women who do not, after all, make up one unified community.  Further, by considering the recent past and the contemporary world through the writings of women of many nationalities (including Canadian, Indian, West-Indian, Japanese, Welsh, and others) in poetry, essays, short and long fiction, this course is a gathering place for diversity of voice, and of choice.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE385 Introduction to Children’s Literature

This course conducts a critical/historical survey of literary works in English composed for, or appropriated by, children.  Selections may vary annually but each year will include both classic and less familiar texts.  The chronological organization will highlight the historical context of the text and enable students to trace shifting ideas about the child and childhood.  Formal literary analysis will be complemented by a variety of critical approaches that will enable the class to explore relevant theoretical issues and to comprehend the cultural and ideological work being done by specific texts.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE387 Contemporary Children’s Literature

This course examines contemporary literary works in English composed for, or appropriated by, children.  Selections may vary annually but each year will include both classic and less familiar texts.  The focus of contemporary children’s literature in a particular year might be thematic, such as coming-of-age narratives, childhood and war, or the journey, or generic, such as fantasy or young adult fiction.  Formal literary analysis will be complemented by a variety of critical approaches that will enable the class to explore relevant theoretical issues and to comprehend the cultural and ideological work being done by specific texts.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE389 The Influence of English Literature in France in the Enlightenment

This course, offered jointly as a “dialogue course” between the English Department and the French Department, will be team-taught by a professor from each department. The course will therefore include classes in English, alternating with classes in French concerning the influence of the English novels (by such authors as Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Jane Austen) on literature of the French Enlightenment, including their reception, their translation, and their adaptation, in a study of how the novels under consideration are invested with new meanings through translation. The student will come to recognize that translation functioned as a compromise between the two cultures rather than conforming to today’s convention of linguistic and semantic equivalence.

Note(s):
This course is designed for students in the third or fourth years in Arts (or at the discretion of the Departments of English and French Studies).
Prerequisite(s):
Students are permitted entry into this course only if they have attained a ‘C’ in the second language Reading Comprehension examination or equivalent.
Semester:
One of the three bilingual courses will generally be offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE390 Creative Writing

This course introduces students to writing creatively in a number of genres, including poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students will have the chance to explore and develop their skills by analyzing such elements as prosody, theme, characterization, plot, dialogue, setting, point of view, openings, and endings. Research into the process of creative writing will inform weekly writing assignments. Students will submit a finished portfolio of original, workshopped, and edited work at the end of the course.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

ENE403 Gender and Literature I

This course aims to introduce students to the various ways literature reflects, constructs, reinforces, and challenges gender roles. The course will explore masculinity and femininity, suggesting that they are always socially constructed and historically specific by examining literature from the Middle Ages to the present. In order to do so, students will explore several different feminist approaches to literature and culture. Ultimately, the course will show that understanding gender as socially constructed rather than biologically given is empowering for society as a whole.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0-0-9)
Credit(s):
1

ENE405 Gender and Literature II

This course examines the various ways in which literature reflects, constructs, reinforces, and challenges gender roles. The course will explore "masculinity" and "femininity," suggesting that they are always socially constructed and historically specific. Students will examine the degree to which gender is an organizing principle in the daily life of Western civilization, looking first at how the gendered body is politicized in specific literary works (prose, poetry, drama) and films. They will then investigate how class and race have the potential to disrupt gender as a primary category of analysis. And, finally, they will discuss the challenges to gender analysis raised by the figure of the transgendered person.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE413 Literature, Culture, and Ecology

This course introduces students to the emerging field of “ecocriticism,” a body of ecologically-oriented literary and cultural scholarship that explores nature both as a cultural construct and as a real, tangible entity on which humanity--and the more than 30 million other species on the planet with whom we are interconnected--depends for survival. Like feminism, postcolonialism, or queer studies, ecocriticism is at its core sociopolitical and global; as such, the course will consider international and often conflicting perspectives on nature and human responsibility by engaging with a diverse range of literary and cultural genres (drama, poetry, narrative, film, news, internet, social media, and electronic gaming) from around the world. Finally, students may assess Western military perceptions of space and place to determine how they influence our understanding of foreign peoples and cultures during overseas deployments.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE415 Literature, Culture, and Evolution

This course investigates how literature specifically, and art and culture more broadly, emerge from evolutionary strategies designed to maximize our adaptive fitness as a species. Students will explore the relationship between biological and environmental influences on the production and consumption of literature, other arts, and the cultural milieu in which they are produced. They will also assess how and why what literary Darwinist Ellen Dissanyake calls “homo aestheticus” relies strongly on art for such diverse evolutionary purposes as transmitting information, strategizing for future events, maintaining kinship and other social networks, selecting mates, sexual reproduction, and developing cognitive capabilities that serve us in other domains. Art and literature, the course will reveal, are much more than accidental byproducts of evolution: they are, like the imagination on which they depend, central to our survival.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE421 Literary Theory I: Postcolonialism, Race, and Ethnicity

This course offers an advanced introduction to the key concepts and questions of postcolonial theory and related theories of race and ethnicity. This course will survey some of the major texts of these theories, as well as their historical, social, political, and philosophical backgrounds, in order to assess their value for understanding our own relation to and perception of those who are “other” to us.  Central to this investigation will be an examination of how categories of racial, ethnic, and cultural difference are constructed, maintained, and contested in literature and culture.

Prerequisite(s):
ENE210 and ENE228 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE423 Literary Theory II: Gender, Sex, and Sexuality

This course offers an advanced introduction to contemporary theories of gender, sex, and sexuality.  This course will survey some of the major texts of these theories, as well as their historical, social, political, and philosophical backgrounds, in order to explore the different ways in which categories of gender, sex, and sexuality have been defined and disrupted, problematized and pluralized by competing thinkers and writers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENE210 and ENE228 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE426 Advanced Directed Study

This course is offered under special circumstances and at the discretion of the Department Head where a student with high standing in earlier English courses wishes to pursue a specific topic in some depth. The course is normally conducted on a tutorial basis and usually includes a considerable amount of written work.

Note(s):
For students in Fourth Year Honours English at the discretion of the Department Head. With the approval of the Department Head, this course may count as a Military Arts credit within the BMASc programme.
Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

ENE427 Studies in Shakespeare I

This course will focus entirely on the dramas of William Shakespeare. The course will centre on the plays from Shakespeare's early career to mid career. Students will study plays from the genres of tragedy, comedy, history, and Roman plays, within the context of a variety of critical approaches. A study of these plays will reveal the remarkable artistry of this great Elizabethan who is still recognized after 400 years as the world's finest dramatist.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE429 Studies in Shakespeare II

This course continues the study of the dramas of William Shakespeare. The course will centre on the plays from Shakespeare's mid career to late career. Students will study plays from the genres of comedy, tragedy, and romance within the context of a variety of critical approaches. The course will also draw attention to Shakespeare in performance and the Shakespearean theatrical conventions within which these plays were performed.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE442 English Dramatic Forms

In this study of dramatic literature from medieval to modern times, students will examine a rich diversity of dramatic forms. The course will begin with an introduction to classical drama and its sustained influence on English literature and then proceed to a study of medieval religious allegorical drama, Renaissance tragedy, Renaissance satiric comedy, Restoration and eighteenth-century comedies of manners, nineteenth-century comedy, modern discussion drama, tragicomedy, and musical drama.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE444 Twentieth-Century Dramatic Literature

In this course, which focuses on dramatic literature of the twentieth century, students will be introduced to a wide variety of modern dramas by pre-eminent playwrights from North America, Britain, Europe, and Africa. These writers have challenged traditional approaches to drama to invent new dramatic styles such as realism, naturalism, poetic drama, symbolism, expressionism, the epic theatre, the theatre of the absurd, and surrealism. The modern theatre has its great definitive scenes which sum up man as he has come to sense himself in the modern world: his most fundamental hopes and fears, his understanding of the shape and currents of the world, and his intuition of his stance in relation to that world.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE449 Literary Journalism

This course studies various works of literary journalism, which combine the craft of in-depth reporting with the art of writing, or “making facts dance,” as Kevin Kerrane describes the genre. In order to understand the characteristics of literary journalism, students will critically assess newspaper and magazine articles, reviews and books, as well as online material. Writing assignments in the course will put the principles of literary journalism into practice.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE450 The News Media and the Military

The course examines the relationship between the news media and the military within the broader context of the pervasive presence of mass media of communication in the political and cultural realms. A critical personal inventory of the students' habits as mass media consumers forms the basis for the course and for each class. The course studies the rhetoric of mass media communication from Plato to today before shifting focus to an investigation of the newsroom, the business and marketing pressures affecting its operation, and the constitutional and legal rights and responsibilities related to freedom of the press. Students will survey and examine in detail examples and case studies of the evolving relationship between the news media and the military in Canada and elsewhere. The aim of this course is to enable students to critically analyze various print and electronic news products, including their modes and styles of presentation, and to evaluate their relationship to the military.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Offered in alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE451 War Literature I

This course surveys and examines war literature from its origins in the Greek classical period to the First World War. The Iliad, Beowulf and Shakespeare's Henry V will be studied as foundational texts that establish the concepts of the hero and the comitatus, the roles of religion and fate, and the characteristics of the war story. The works of the First World War trench poets, the memoirs of Graves and Brittain, and Hemingway's fiction will focus analysis on how the unforgettable experience of war becomes realized in various literary forms.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE453 War Literature II

This course surveys and examines war literature from the Second World War to the present. The course begins by studying how the unforgettable experience of Second World War combatants is represented in fiction, memoir and poetry. The Canadian novel Execution is used as the focal point of this critical analysis. The stories of non-combatants and civilians, including a survivor of the Holocaust, extend the range of wartime experience beyond the combat veteran. Study of post-war texts focuses on the Cold War and Vietnam. The course concludes with an examination of the writings of Canadians about UN missions and the war in Afghanistan.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE470 Topics in English Literature

Seminars offered by faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered at the discretion of the department.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE471 Topics in English Literature

Seminars offered by faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered at the discretion of the department.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE472 Topics in English Literature

Seminars offered by faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered at the discretion of the department.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE473 Topics in English Literature

Seminars offered by faculty on topics related to their own research or interests. Consult the departmental home page for further details.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered at the discretion of the department.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE474 Chosen Topics in Literary Studies

This course is designed so that professors in the Department of English will be able to share with the students the results of their research in a particular area of literary studies that does not form part of the regular Honours or Major stream. Topics will vary with the interests and research of the faculty.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Offered at the discretion of the Department.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE484 Post-Colonial Literature

In this course, students will have an opportunity to examine selected modern literary works from Africa, South Asia and the West Indies, as well as to assess how writers in those societies have depicted the throes of revolution, the pain of exile, the struggle for freedom, the waning of colonialism, the anguish of alienation, and the quest for identity. Students will be encouraged to approach the writers and their works historically and critically.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall, alternate years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE485 Utopian and Dystopian Literature

This course will focus on the ideal of a perfect society that has dominated the human imagination ever since the days of Plato. Students will study the utopian and dystopian ideas in the works of Plato, More, Shakespeare, Swift, Shelley, Stevenson, Wells, Huxley, Burgess and Atwood. They will be encouraged to explore the following themes among others: Plato's Myth of the Cave, the philosopher king, imperfect societies, the idea of utopia, utopia perverted into dystopia, tyranny and dictatorship, hubris and nemesis, religion versus science, the abuse of science, individuality and freedom, power and the state.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Offered in alternate years
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE486 The Tale of Mystery and Imagination

This course offers a critical and analytical approach to one of the most popular forms of literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will encounter many variations of what Poe called the tale of ratiocination, as well as the tale of mystery and imagination. They will study the works of well-known writers such as Arthur Conan Doyle, Wilkie Collins, G.K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie, Robert Louis Stevenson, Dashiell Hammet, Raymond Chandler, John le Carré and Simon Winchester. Students will be expected not only to read extensively but also to analyse and critically evaluate what they read. They will be encouraged to engage in creative writing.

Corequisite(s):
ENE210 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, alternate years
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

ENE492 Seminar in Advanced Professional Skills

This course is available only to Honours students of English. It is a specialized study of advanced professional skills related to the discipline. At the end of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate a range of advanced skills selected from but not limited to the following: skills in research, writing, editing, public presentation, grant and proposal writing, and colloquium organization. The course may take a variety of forms, from a series of guest speakers to a focused exploration of a current research topic, or a combination of both.

Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter, every year
Note(s):
Compulsory for all students in Fourth Year Honours English
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1
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