Undergraduate Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Courses

 

Courses 100-199

CCE101 Introductory Chemistry

The course is designed to present the fundamental principles of chemistry as illustrated through science and engineering applications.  The course begins with a review of stoichiometry, chemical theory of bonding (orbitals, hybridization, Lewis structures), introductions to each of organic (nomenclature, functional groups, polymers), inorganic (metals, catalysts) and environmental chemistry.  The course continues with the study of gases, chemical kinetics, acid-base equilibria, colligative properties and solubility.  Thermodynamics, including the First Law, energy, work and heat, enthalpies of reaction, Second Law, entropy changes in simple physical and chemical processes and Gibbs free energy are studied.  The final topic is electrochemistry (redox reactions, electrochemical cells, batteries, fuel cells and corrosion). Laboratory experiments and tutorials reinforce and supplement lecture material.

Note(s):
For students enrolled in Science and Engineering.
Laboratories taught in three (3) consecutive periods.
Prerequisite(s):
High School Leaving Chemistry or equivalent
Contact Hours:
3 - 2 - 5
Credit(s):
2
 

CCE106 Basic Chemistry

The course begins with the classification and physical properties of matter, measurement, errors and dimensional analysis. It then progresses to chemical nomenclature, chemical formulas, valence, chemical reactions, chemical equations and stoichiometry, followed by the properties of gases, liquids and solutions. Finally, the atomic theory of matter, introduction to electronic structure, the periodic table of the elements and an introduction to chemical bonding completes this course. A laboratory accompanies this course.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Laboratories taught in three (3) consecutive periods (this applies to on-site course offerings only).
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a degree in Science or Engineering.
Exclusion:
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 2 - 5 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

CCE151 Introduction to Nuclear Science

An introductory course for arts students with little or no previous background in nuclear or radiation science. This course will review the basic terminology and science of nuclear engineering. The current atomic structure models and the processes of radioactive decay are explained and discussed. Interaction of the various types of radiation with matter is covered, and this basis is used for the introduction of the subsequent subjects, including radiation detection, measurement, and shielding.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
Exclusion:
CCE351
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

Courses 200-299

CCE200 Contemporary Chemistry

This course is designed to familiarize the student with a variety of current topics which are primarily chemical in nature. Some basic chemistry will be introduced at the beginning of the course to enable the student to comprehend the chemical systems that will be examined. The main topics to be covered include: the chemistry of water, water pollution, air pollution, modern energy sources, plastics and polymers and their environmental impact, food chemistry, agricultural chemistry, and pharmaceuticals and drugs.

Note(s):
This is a core curriculum course for Arts students.
An elective course for students of the Second Year taking Arts, and other students with the permission of the Department.
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a degree in Science or Engineering.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE203 Chemical Engineering Processes

This course is designed to prepare students to formulate and solve material and energy balances on chemical process systems. It establishes the fundamentals of chemical engineering and lays the foundation for subsequent courses. It also introduces the engineering approach to solving process-related problems. This includes separating a process into its components, establishing the relations between known and unknown process variables and assembling the information needed to solve for the unknowns using a combination of experimentation, empiricism and the application of natural laws. The course is designed to be interactive in nature where students are guided through problem solutions in a lecture environment while given opportunity to practice their own problem solving capabilities through problem sessions and homework assignments. The use of computer-aided process simulation is also introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE204 Military Chemistry

Topics that will be covered, in a largely qualitative manner, include the nature, physiology and pathology, prophylaxis, detection and decontamination of classical chemical agents, such as nerve, vesicant, choking and blood agents and classical biological agents, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi and rickettsia. Radiological weapons will be discussed from the perspective of the variety of options and the biological hazard posed. Also covered will be the effects of nuclear weapons on vehicles, structures and personnel. Specific radiological and nuclear topics will include detection and dosimetry, and the distinct hazards posed by alpha, beta, and gamma and neutron radiation. Protective measures, both individual and collective, counter NBC agents, will also be discussed.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education
An elective course for students of the Second, Third or Fourth Year taking Arts.
Not offered every year.
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a degree in Science or Engineering.
Exclusion(s):
CCE463 or CCE474
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

CCE211 Analytical Chemistry

This is a lecture course that will be combined with a laboratory component. Topics include the process of chemical measurement from sampling through analysis to the interpretation of results with applications to chemistry and related disciplines. Experimental errors and statistics of measurements will be included. Topics also include wet analytical chemistry, spectrophotometry and instrumental chemical analysis – principles of gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometric detection, new separation methods, electrochemical analysis, and inductively coupled plasma-based elemental analysis. Sample preparation techniques for environmental and biological materials will also be included.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry, or a Major in Chemistry, and an elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
Contact Hours: 3 - 3 - 7
Credit(s):
1.5

CCE218 Physical Chemistry of Matter

In the first part of the course the following topics are investigated: First Law of Thermodynamics, internal energy, enthalpy, adiabatic changes; The Second Law of Thermodynamics, Carnot heat engine, The Clausius Inequality and the Mathematical Statement of the Second Law, conditions for spontaneity, statistical and thermodynamic definitions of entropy. The course will then look at the third Law of thermodynamics and absolute entropies, standard states and standard thermodynamic functions. The final section will focus on kinetics of gases, Boltzmann distribution and collisions.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Corequisite(s):
MAE226
Exclusion(s):
CCE312
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE240 Molecular & Cellular Biology

This introductory course is focused on molecular and cellular biology. It will prepare students for the upper year courses, CCE385, CCE460 and CCE483. The course introduces the four primary biomolecules (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids), and discusses their properties, roles and importance in living organisms. Basic cellular biology (prokaryotes vs. eukaryotes) is also covered, including the metabolic requirements of cells, and processes of photosynthesis and respiration. The course also introduces genetics. Efforts are made to present unifying biological and chemical concepts with examples to encourage student understanding rather than memorization.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
For students taking Chemical Engineering, Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
Corequisite(s):
CCE101 or CCE106 (CCE101 can be taken as a corequisite)
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

CCE242 Biology of Organisms

This introductory course in general biology follows directly from CCE240. It moves beyond the basics of molecular and cellular biology, to focus on basic themes and concepts of biology spanning organizational levels from organisms to ecosystems. Specifically, this course will explore how multicellular organisms evolved to exploit different environments, and the diverse array of biochemical, physiological, and behavioural mechanisms promoting survival and reproduction. The first part of the course focuses on plant form and function, and the second on animal form and function. The course then studies how groups of species (both plants and animals) interact with the environment to form dynamic ecosystems. Effort will be made to present unifying biological and chemical concepts with examples to encourage student understanding rather than just memorization.

Prerequisite(s):
CCE240
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE245 Biology Laboratory I

This course is an introduction to basic methods and instrumentation in biology, emphasizing fundamental laboratory procedures. Topics studied will include enzyme catalysis and protein determination, anaerobic fermentation, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, and other topics that complement CCE240.

Corequisite(s):
CCE240
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
0 - 3 - 3
Credit(s):
0.5

CCE246 Biology Laboratory II

This course is an introduction to basic methods and instrumentation in biology, emphasizing fundamental laboratory procedures. Topics studied will include control of microbes, invertebrate and vertebrate dissections, plant growth and other topics that complement CCE242.

Corequisite(s):
CCE242
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
0 - 3 - 3
Credit(s):
0.5

CCE247 Organic Chemistry I

An introductory course in organic chemistry chiefly concerned with the structure, properties, reactions, and synthesis of mono-functional alkanes and alkenes. Stereochemistry and reaction mechanism theory are integral parts of the course. A brief study is also made of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including the interpretation of spectra. Simple preparations are performed in the laboratory. Methods of characterization and identification of organic compounds, as well as spectroscopic methods of analysis, are included in laboratory assignments.

Note(s):
For students of the Second Year taking Chemical Engineering, Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
This course replaces one half of former Organic Chemistry course CCE241.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Exclusion:
CCE241
Contact Hours:
3 - 3 - 6
Credit(s):
1.5

CCE248 Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CCE247, Organic Chemistry I. This course will focus on the structure, properties, reactions, and synthesis of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The reactivity of several functional groups will be studied, including carboxylic acids and their derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, enols, and enolates. Organometallic reagents and the oxidation/reduction reactions of alcohols will also be covered. Reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry are integral parts of the course. A brief study is also made of mass spectroscopy, including the interpretation of spectra. Simple preparations are performed in the laboratory. Methods of characterization and identification of organic compounds, as well as spectroscopic methods of analysis, are included in laboratory assignments.

Note(s):
For students of the Second Year taking Chemical Engineering, Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
This course replaces one half of former Organic Chemistry course CCE241.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE247
Exclusion:
CCE241
Contact Hours:
3 - 3 - 6
Credit(s):
1.5

CCE253 Materials Science

This introductory course in the chemical science and engineering of materials is focused on solids. The fundamentals of crystal structure and crystallography are introduced that include unit cells, and symmetry elements for metals, ionic and covalently bonded materials, which serve as the basis for the study of imperfections in solids that lead to dislocations, point and surface defects that ultimately can lead to materials failure. Diffusion mechanisms are examined based on Fick's First and Second Laws. Phase diagrams for two and more component systems are studied including those for steel and other engineering alloys. Ceramics are studied and phase diagrams used for applications to silicates and glasses. The properties and structures of polymers are introduced with their engineering applications. The electrical properties of materials, including semi-conductors, are also studied.

Note(s):
For students taking Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE254 Concepts in Inorganic Chemistry

This course covers the principles and applications of inorganic chemistry, beginning with an overview of the periodic table and a detailed investigation of atomic structure and the modern bonding theories, emphasizing the periodicity of chemical and physical properties and molecular structure of main group compounds and briefly describing the structure and bonding of select inorganic solids. Concepts of acids-bases are developed, followed by a review of oxidation-reduction chemistry, with special emphasis on the diagrammatic representation of potential data. The laboratory portion of the course will emphasize the concepts developed in class, focusing on inorganic synthesis, characterization, and properties.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Contact Hours:
3 - 3 - 6
Credit(s):
1.5

CCE274 Introductory Organic Chemistry for Chemical Warfare Agents

An introductory course in organic chemistry beginning with organic functional groups and nomenclature. The structure and properties of organic compounds, with emphasis on chemical warfare agents, are integral parts of the course. Select reactions pertaining to the synthesis and decomposition of chemical warfare agents will also be covered. This course will include a primarily qualitative discussion on the nature and identification of traditional chemical warfare agents including: nerve, vesicant, choking, blood, psychochemical and incapacitating classifications. In addition, a brief introduction to energetic materials and their reactions will be discussed.

Note(s):
Also offered through Distance Education.
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking arts.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered on-site in the Fall or the Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

CCE281 Corrosion: Impact, Principles, and Practical Solutions

Corrosion is responsible for the failure of many systems and structures. This course describes the importance of corrosion problems in relation to material cost, reduced performance, reliability, and impact on the environment. The course covers the basics of what makes environments corrosive, with an introduction to corrosion chemistry, to corrosion thermodynamics, and to the electrochemical theory that relates corrosion current with mass and thickness loss rates of various materials. Forms of corrosion are described in relation to environmental accidents and to methods commonly used to control corrosion. Examples of corrosion in water, soils, and in various atmospheres are also used to introduce these prevention techniques.

Note(s) :
Only offered through Distance Education.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

CCE285 Introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment

This course prepares students to complete and review Environmental Impact Assessments. The origins, philosophies and approaches to environmental assessment are compared and discussed in detail. Different facets of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) are also studied in depth, including its history, application, regulations, and process. Students are introduced to the assessment of social and economic as well as biophysical impacts; typical impacts from military operations are also discussed. Through assignments, students will apply the knowledge and skills in the application of environmental assessment at the screening level to typical projects or operations.

Note(s) :
Only offered through Distance Education
No prerequisites, although completion of "CCE289: Impact of Science and Technology on the Environment" is recommended.
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a degree in Science or Engineering.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

CCE289 Environmental Sciences: Impact of Science and Technology on the Environment

This course analyzes the relationship between human activity and the environment. It assesses the impact of technological development on the environment and introduces such concepts as biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric processes (ozone layer, greenhouse effect, acid rain), and ecosystem self-regulation. An overview of the international environmental challenges and of current federal environment agenda will help the student develop a personal perspective on global environmental protection.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a degree in Science or Engineering.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

Courses 300-399

CCE300 Fluid Mechanics

This course emphasizes the basic concepts of fluid mechanics and includes a study of the following: fluid and flow properties, fluid statics, fundamental equations of fluid motion, control volume concept applied to the continuity, momentum and energy equations; flow measuring devices; shear stress in laminar and turbulent flow, viscous and inviscid flow; introduction to the concepts of boundary layer and drag; engineering applications of flow in closed conduits.  Special mathematical techniques, industrial and military applications are included.

Note(s):
Not offered every year.
Students taking Chemical Engineering substitute MEE311.
Prerequisite(s):
PHE104, MAE227 (or equivalent)
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE305 Heat Transfer

The fundamental concepts and mechanisms of heat transfer processes are studied. The following topics in heat transfer are covered: differential equations of heat transfer, steady and unsteady state conduction in one and two dimensions using analytical and numerical; heat transfer with free and forced convection in laminar and turbulent flow; boiling and condensation heat transfer; heat transfer equipment; radiation heat transfer. The course includes laboratory work that illustrates and complements the lecture materials.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE313, MAE227
Corequisite(s):
MEE311
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE306 Hazardous Materials Management

This course gives students the tools to understand the general nature of hazardous materials and their management, as well as the specifics of the hazards presented by, and the requirements for safe handling of, the various classes of hazardous materials. The course includes a review of chemistry, including nomenclature and reaction chemistry. In addition, the various classes of hazardous materials are discussed, covering the specific nature of the hazard and selected examples of representative materials, and proper handling, storage and disposal procedures. CAF/DND orders and directives and Canadian legislation relevant to hazardous materials are also examined.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a Science or Engineering degree.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE289
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

CCE309 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

This course covers the following major topic areas: Schrodinger equation for the H-atom, hydrogen-like orbitals, energy levels and atomic transitions, multi-electron atoms, variational principle, Hund's Rule. Born-Oppenheimer approximation, vibrational and rotational states. Molecular orbital treatment of diatomic molecules, hybridization and polyatomic molecules. Absorption and emission of radiation in simple molecules, selection rules, fluorescence, phosphorescence and radiationless transitions.  Infrared spectroscopy.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Prerequisite(s):
PHE225 or PHE226
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE315 Chemical and Materials Engineering Computations

This course develops the mathematical background required to formulate and solve ordinary and partial differential equations arising in chemical engineering. Topics include Fourier series and orthogonal functions, the method of Frobenius and Legendre equations, and eigenfunctions expansions for the Sturm-Liouville problem. Solution of partial differential equations is done by analytical methods, including the use of Fourier and Laplace transforms methods. The course covers the numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Probability and Statistics are covered as basis for application to the analysis of experimental results and in the design of experimental procedures and computer simulation results interpretation.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CSE101, CCE203, MAE315
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE317 Kinetics and Surface Science

This course develops the empirical treatment of the rate laws and orders of reaction, complex reactions, theories of reaction rates, the Arrhenius relationship and experimental methods. Introduction to combustion and explosions including chain reactions, free radicals, thermal and branched-chain explosions, delayed branching and degenerate explosions will also be introduced. The course is completed by a study of the nature and properties of surfaces of solids, physical absorption and chemisorption; the development of Langmuir - Hinshelwood equations, the linking of kinetics and chemisorption, and heterogeneous catalysis.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering, Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE318 Applied Thermodynamics I

The following topics are included in this course: the first law of thermodynamics, work and heat, internal energy and enthalpy, sensible heat, latent heat, standard heats, ideal PVT and introduction to compressibility factors, use of thermodynamic tables, steady state flow systems, unsteady state flow systems, the second law of thermodynamics, exergy or availability, power cycles, and refrigeration.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
This course replaces the former Applied Thermodynamics I course CCE312.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Corequisite(s):
CCE203
Exclusion(s):
CCE218, CCE312
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE319 Applied Thermodynamics II

The following topics are developed in this course: PVT, generalized correlations and corresponding states, virial equation of state, cubic equations of state and applications, thermodynamic properties and property relationships, equilibrium, vapour liquid equilibria, Clausius & Clausius Clapeyron equations, phase equilibria, fugacity and residual functions, mixing functions, activity and excess functions, phase equilibria calculations, chemical reaction equilibria, and van’t Hoff`s equation. The course includes laboratory work that illustrates and complements the lecture materials.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
This course replaces the former Applied Thermodynamics II course CCE313. 
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203, CCE318
Exclusion(s):
CCE328, CCE313
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE325 Materials Engineering

The following topics are included in this course: mechanical properties of materials, mechanical testing, non-destructive testing, phase transformation in metals, applications and processing of metal alloys, failure, applications and processing of ceramics, polymers and composites, corrosion and degradation of materials. The course includes laboratory work that illustrates and complements the lecture materials.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
An elective course for students taking other science programmes.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE253
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE327 Physical Chemistry Laboratory

The course will illustrate physicochemical principles presented in CCE218 and CCE328(C) with selected experiments. The concepts presented will include: phase transitions in binary systems; glass transition and viscosity of polymers; physical adsorption and reversibility; determination of X-Ray structures; ionic activity coefficients as determined from ion concentrations using ion-selective electrodes. The experimental period includes an introduction to several experimental techniques used including: X-Ray Diffraction; Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC).

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
0 - 3 - 3
Credit(s):
0.5

CCE328 Physical Chemistry of Reactions

The following major topic areas are covered in the course: Chemical potential and application of thermodynamics to phase equilibria in one and multi-component systems; Application of thermodynamics to chemical equilibria in ideal gas mixtures and ideal solutions; Activities and thermodynamics of non ideal systems; Reaction kinetics: phenomenological rate laws, mechanisms, steady state treatments, linear and branched chain reactions; Surface chemistry: Langmiur adsorption and mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis. The course will be combined with a laboratory section which will include experiments designed to illustrate physicochemical principles with selected experiments. The concepts presented will include: phase transitions in binary systems; glass transition and viscosity of polymers; physical adsorption and reversibility; and ionic activity coefficients as determined from ion concentrations using ion-selective electrodes. The lecture period includes an introduction to several experimental techniques used including thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE218 or CCE312
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE337 Seminar

Technical, ethical, legal, environmental, and safety topics are covered by seminars given by staff and invited speakers. Topics will be chosen to encompass and extend the technical subjects of the other courses so as to be useful to the working graduate engineer in the military.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering, Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
0 - 0.5 - 0
Credit(s):
0

CCE351 Nuclear Science and Engineering

From a review of current atomic structure models, the several processes of radioactive decay are explained and discussed, followed by the various nuclear reactions, including the fission process.  The interactions of the various types of radiation with matter are covered, and are used as the basis for covering subsequent subjects such as radiation detection and measurement, and shielding against radiation.  The students then learn how radiation affects the living tissues, and the concepts of health physics are introduced, leading to defining the radiation dose concepts and units and to the subject of radiation protection and safety. Several examples of applications of radioisotopes and radiation are then presented in areas as diversified as nuclear medicine, research, analysis, food preservation, radiation processing in the chemical industry and smoke detectors.  Emphasis is given to applications of interest to the Canadian Forces, such as the neutron-based anti-personal land mine detector. The course includes laboratory work that illustrates and complements the lecture materials.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
An elective course for students taking Honours Science or a Major in Science.
Prerequisite(s):
MAE227 or permission
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE354 Transition Metal Chemistry

Aspects of the coordination chemistry of metal complexes are discussed with reference to structures and symmetry elements, ligand field theory, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and magnetic and spectroscopic properties. Modern organometallic chemistry is introduced, including a discussion of metal-ligand bonding and selected catalytic applications of industrial importance. The laboratory portion of the course will emphasize the concepts developed in class, focusing on inorganic synthesis, characterization, and reaction mechanisms.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE254
Contact Hours:
3 - 3 - 6
Credit(s):
1.5

CCE360 Environmental Sciences: Hazardous Materials

The course is designed to assist the young officer in the role of Base Environmental Officer or Unit General Safety Officer, roles that the officer must fill regardless of Classification. Topics include the properties of flammable, corrosive, reactive, toxic and radioactive materials; handling and storage techniques; safe disposal methods of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes. The impact of various materials on living systems and the environment will be explored.

Note(s):
A core curriculum course.
An elective course for students of the Third or Fourth Year taking Arts. Not offered every year.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE362 Environmental Sciences: Energy

Traditional energy sources and the associated technology are reviewed including those of fossil resources, hydroelectric power, and nuclear fission. The required raw materials, their world-wide occurrence and distribution will be examined in a political, strategic and economic context. Methods to determine the Total Unit Energy Costs will be outlined and the various sources of energy compared economically. Novel energy sources including solar, wind, geothermal, hydrogen and fusion are studied. Various aspects of the hydrogen economy will be explored. The environmental risks and social impact of large scale energy production are discussed.

Note(s):
A core curriculum course.
An elective course for students of the Third or Fourth Year taking Arts.
Not offered every year.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE366 Environmental Sciences: Impact of Technology on the Environment

The concept of energy is introduced by discussing the definition, terms, units, use, resources, conversion and conservation. The laws of thermodynamics, temperature, heat transfer, heat engines and heat pumps are briefly covered. Conventional energy sources (fossil, hydroelectric, fission) are studied as well as alternate sources (solar, wind) and currencies (electricity, hydrogen). The environmental impact of these sources is included. Group seminars on specific topics, such as energy sources and uses of interest to DND, are presented.

Note(s):
A core curriculum course.
An elective course for students of the Third or Fourth Year taking Arts.
Not offered every year.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE370 Combustion and Explosions

The course will address the physical and chemical processes associated with combustion and explosion reactions, including the production processes, chemical properties and reactions of energetic materials, for primary and secondary explosives, propellants and pyrotechnic formulations used in military and common civilian applications. Additional topics include detection, disposal, safety in handling and transportation, as well as appropriate classifications and regulations, will also be discussed. Criteria for sensitivity, and techniques for predicting and measuring stability and thermal yields, are examined. The generation of blast and its effects on personnel and structures will also be addressed.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
Introductory-level Organic Chemistry or CCE247 and CCE248 or CCE274
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall and or the Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE371 Chemical Principles of Ammunition

The course examines the historical development of propellants and explosives, their production, and military employment. After a basic review of heat and work, the basis of the adiabatic flame temperature and effects of an explosion in gaseous, liquid, and solid media are presented. The unique phenomena in detonation waves and real effects in an explosive are qualitatively described. Detonation and deflagration, sensitivity, and performance criteria are presented. Representative current propellants, primary explosives, secondary explosives, and pyrotechnic formulations are examined in detail. Limitations and potential areas of development for future materials are explored.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200, PHE134
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE372 Introduction to Ballistics

This course is an introduction to the field of ballistics. Emphasis is placed on achieving a fundamental understanding of principles through the solution of basic ballistics problems in areas of internal, intermediate, and external ballistics. The physical requirements and limitations to the design of specific ammunition, from small arms and grenades to guided weapons, are also explored.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200, PHE134
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE373 Chemical Warfare Agents: Physiological Toxicity and Protection

This course will include a primary qualitative discussion on the mechanism of action, toxicity and subsequent physiological effects for each of the traditional chemical warfare agents and an overview of dispersion methods, detection and decontamination. The issue of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) will be addressed as they present a primary threat, particularly in the context of the asymmetric threat presented by terrorism. Chemical/biological protective measures, both individual and collective, will be covered, with an emphasis on the issues that are driving future research in this field. Current and future trends regarding the availability and usage of medical countermeasures (MCMs) will be examined.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
Introductory-level Organic Chemistry or CCE247 and CCE248 or CCE274
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall and or the Winter ( in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE374 Chemical Warfare Agents: Dispersion, Detection and Decontamination

This course will include a primarily qualitative discussion on the dissemination characteristics of chemical agents as well as their behaviour in the environment. Dispersion modeling techniques and software will be introduced and an overview of the basic reactions characteristic of the environmental degradation of CWAs discussed. The basics of current detection technologies, as well as an examination of future trends, are covered, with emphasis on equipment used by the first responder community. In addition, this course examines the factors that must be considered when determining the appropriate means to deal with the decontamination of personnel, equipment, infrastructure and the environment following an accidental or voluntary CWA release.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
Introductory-level Organic Chemistry or CCE247 and CCE248 or CCE274
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall and or the Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE375 Radiological Devices and Nuclear Weapons

Several applications of radioisotopes and radiation are presented in this course. These include nuclear medicine, nuclear analysis, food preservation, and energy production. Special emphasis is given to applications of interest to the Canadian Forces and survey equipment / dosimeters employed by the CBRNE community. The principles and characteristics of nuclear weapons will also be discussed and related to the physical and nuclear radiation effects on humans, structures and equipment.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
Introductory-level Nuclear Science course or CCE151 or CCE351
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall and or the Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE376 Health Physics and Radiation Protection

The interaction of the various types of radiation with matter is reviewed and the topics of radiation detection, measurement, shielding are discussed in greater detail. The students learn how radiation affects living tissues and the concepts of health physics are introduced. Particular attention is paid to distance-yield relationships leading to the definition of radiation dose and appropriate dosimetry units. The topics of radiation protection, radiological pathology and dosimetry will be covered. Finally, radiological instruments used by the Canadian Forces will be reviewed and the science behind their operation discussed.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
Introductory-level Nuclear Science course or CCE151 or CCE351
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall or the Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE377 CBR Warfare Agents: Detection, Dispersion and Decontamination

This course will include a primary qualitative discussion on the mechanism of action, toxicity and subsequent physiological effects of Chemical, Biological, Radiological (CBR) warfare agents, including Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs). Dissemination and dispersion characteristics of agents and TICs will be examine in relation to current Detection, Protection and Decontamination capabilities and design considerations. The range of physical and chemical CBR detection principles and capabilities will be covered extensively with an introduction into potential future technology. Current Individual and Collective Protective measures will be assessed with regards to Protection Factors (PFs) and hardening design strategies. Finally, this course will examine the factors that must be considered when determining the appropriate means to deal with the decontamination of personnel, equipment, infrastructure and the environment following an accidental or voluntary CBR Agent or TICs release.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the second, third or fourth year taking Arts.
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE151, CCE240, and CCE274
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall and or the Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6 (Distance Learning 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

CCE385 Biotechnology

This course involves the basic principles of chemistry, biochemistry and microbiology applied to environmental systems and problems. The fundamentals and principles of biochemistry, including important biomolecules, bioenergetics and kinetics are discussed. A systematic and quantitative description is given for the necessary inorganic and organic reactions in aerobic and anaerobic media, biokinetics, medium formulation, growth rates and population dynamics, sterilization and genetic engineering. Applications include waste water treatment, bioremediation, fermentation processes and vaccines.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering or Honours Chemistry, or a Major in Chemistry.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Also offered through Distance Education.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE240, CCE247 and CCE248
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3 (Distance Learning: 0 - 0 - 9)
Credit(s):
1

CCE386 Introduction to Environmental Management Systems

This course provides an overview of the principles of environmental management. The ISO 14001, the Standard for Environmental Management Systems (EMS), is the International standard for environmental management adopted by industry and governments worldwide, and the Canadian federal government has adopted the principles of this standard for all federal departments and organizations. These key principles are the focus of this course, and discussions include how to implement EMS in an organization. A detailed examination of the definitions and requirements of  ISO 14001, as well as of the concepts of environmental performance indicators, encourage students to think about environmental responsibility.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
For Arts students only. This course cannot be applied to a Science or Engineering degree.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

CCE406 Mass Transfer

The following topics are included in this course: molecular diffusion in gases, liquids and solids, unsteady-state diffusion, equations of change and the boundary layer, convective mass transfer, interphase mass transfer. The course includes laboratory work that illustrates and complements the lecture materials.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE305, CCE313
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE407 Reaction Engineering

This course builds on the material of CCE317 and introduces students to the analysis and design of chemical reactors as employed in materials conversion and purification systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions in single ideal batch and flow reactors, and in reactor combinations, are studied. The analysis of real reactors is introduced. As part of the design function, optimization of reactor performance is introduced. The course includes laboratory work that illustrates and complements the lecture materials.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE313, CCE317
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE409 Combustion and Explosives Engineering

The study of the physical and chemical processes associated with applied combustion science that include concepts from thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, mass transfer and heat transfer. Also studied are pre-mixed and diffusion flames, combustion suppression and combustion pollutants. An introduction is given to energetic materials, explosions and gun propellants.

Note(s):
Elective for students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203, CCE312, CCE313, CCE317
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE413 Systems Analysis: Modelling and Optimization

The formulation of mathematical models from word statements of engineering problems and digital computer simulation are emphasized in this course. The students are introduced to the methods of computer simulation of engineering systems as used within the industry, for the prediction of the (steady-state) behaviour and performance of various processes and systems of contemporary and future significance to the Canadian Forces. Several modern optimization techniques are studied and applied to solve optimization problems by numerical methods on computers. Economic models are examined for process systems in terms of the relationships between physical and economic parameters.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203, CCE300, CCE305, MAE315, CCE315, CCE351, CCE406
Corequisite(s):
 CCE407.
Semester:
Not offered every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE415 Control Systems and Instrumentation

This course emphasizes the basic concepts of control system analysis. Topics include: review of the Laplace transforms; transfer functions and responses of open-loop systems; measurement techniques; analysis of linear closed-loop systems including control system, closed-loop transfer functions, transient response and stability; frequency-response methods; direct digital control (DDC) covering the functions of digital computers for control of industrial processes, analysis of sampled data, response and stability of open and closed-loop sampled systems. Practical examples are selected from various courses in the programme.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
MAE315
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE416 Nanotechnology

This course presents the mains theoretical principles of nanotechnology, molecular interactions and recognition, self-assembly, and nanolithography. The concepts of layer-by-layer self-assembly, self-assembly of polymers and nanolithography are presented. The course will also present the synthesis and use of carbon nanotubes, their structure and electronic properties for high technology applications. A review of modern techniques for characterization at the nanometer level for ordered and disordered materials will be presented. The students will prepare a presentation on a subject of their choice related to the course and will present a literature review.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemistry
Prerequisite(s):
CCE328
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE417 Design Project

The purpose of this course is to permit each engineering student, normally working as one of a group, to participate in the engineering design of a process or system. Emphasis is placed on design techniques, on the integration of material taught in previous science and engineering courses, on design project organization and administration, and on economic evaluation of the system being designed. Ethical concerns such as safety, environmental and societal impact of engineered systems are also integral parts of the projects. The course includes two oral presentations as well as a written technical report that develop the student's skill in oral and written communication. When possible, students are encouraged to present their work at student conferences. Design projects are selected, where possible, based on current and foreseen engineering applications in the Canadian Forces which fall within the scope of the programme, and may involve direct liaison with DND technical establishments and directorates.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203, CCE305, CCE325, CCE406, CCE407
Corequisite(s):
CCE431
Contact Hours:
Fall Term: 0 - 4 - 4 Winter Term: 0-5-5
Credit(s):
2

CCE420 Chemistry Senior Project

The purpose of this course is to offer the possibility of doing an in-depth study of a scientific topic in which the student is particularly interested. The format is flexible and depends on the topic area. At one end of the spectrum, the student could be associated with a research team in the department focused in Chemistry, Biology or Environmental Sciences, and be given responsibility for part of a research project. At the other end, the student may choose a programme of independent study under the supervision of a member of the faculty. In all cases, the student's progress would be regularly monitored and an interim report would be submitted by the student at the end of the Fall term. The final mark would be based on a combination of assessment by the faculty supervisor(s) and an oral presentation to the Honours Science students and a faculty assessment committee.

Note(s):
Mandatory for Chemistry (Honours) students.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 5
Credit(s):
2

CCE422 Applied Experimental Design and Data Analysis

The methodology for developing efficient experimental plans for reduced experimentation and maximum informational output will be presented, and the use of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression models for data analysis emphasized. Multivariate analysis methodologies including cluster analysis, use of correlation matrices, principle component analysis (PCA), and partial least squares (PLS) regression will be presented with a focus on applied data analysis and industrial process optimization. Data distributions including normality and homoscedasticity will be discussed in the context of analysis methodology assumptions and the use of transformations for data analysis covered.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE425 Polymers Engineering

The following topics in polymer science and engineering are covered: chemistry and kinetics of polymerization, polymerization processes, physical and mechanical characterization, additive systems, reinforcements and fillers as well as polymeric part fabrication processes. The relationship between the polymer properties and their use in civilian and military applications is emphasized.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE247 and CCE248
Semester:
Not offered every year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE428 Electrochemistry

The course covers the following topics: definition, coulometry, current efficiency, typical electrochemical cells and electrical energy storage/utilization: primary cell (MnO2-Zn), secondary cell (Pb-acid), fuel cell (SOFC), plating (Watts Ni), winning (Zn-acid) and refining cells (Cu-acid); electrolytic conductance: strong and weak electrolytes, ionic mobility, transference number, ionic diffusivity, limiting current, anode blocking; Throwing power of electroplating systems; Electrolytic conductance in molten salts and oxides; Thermodynamics of cells, Nernst equation; Thermal exchange accompanying electrolysis; Concentration cells and electrometric probes, Electrochemical conventions for ions in aqueous solution, reference electrodes, standard electrode potential, ionic activity and Debye-Huckel equation; Thermodynamic properties of ions in aqueous electrolytes; Electrode overvoltage and its measurement; Significance of hydrogen overvoltage in aqueous electrochemistry; Butler-Volmer equation and simplified forms; Exchange current density concept; Concentration overpotential; Passivity and overvoltage; Multiple reactions at one electrode; Implications on current efficiency, energy consumption and cell operation; Modelling the performance of an electrochemical cell.  The course ends with a discussion of power cells and fuel cells in relation to electrochemical concepts developed in course.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering.
An elective course for students taking other Science programmes
Prerequisite(s):
CCE253, CCE325
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE429 Corrosion

The principles of corrosion are applied to solving modern technological problems.  The course covers the following topics:  units and forms of corrosion; economic implications; materials in relation to environments; electrochemical concept of corrosion; corrosion current density; aqueous versus dry (high temperature) corrosion; Redox potential-pH (Pourbaix) diagrams; their use in active, passive and immune classification concept; development from electrochemical and thermochemical data; limitations and circumvention thereof; extension to systems involving complexing ions and alloys; mixed potential (Evans) diagrams; concept of corrosion potential and rate controlling reaction; effects of galvanic coupling; flow assisted corrosion; differential aeration; passivation; development of mixed potential diagrams for polarization studies; corrosion control; sacrificial systems; impressed current cathodic and anodic protection, inhibitors and non-metallic coatings; corrosion monitoring and testing techniques emphasizing electrochemical methods.  The course concludes on the topic of high temperature corrosion:  calculation of predominance diagrams and their use, scale adhesion and growth, internal oxidation of alloys and environmental modifications.

Note(s):
An elective course for students taking Chemical Engineering or other Science Programmes.
Not offered every year.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE253, CCE325
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE431 Unit Operations and Process Design

This course is a semester-long case study that illustrates the complete process design sequence and teaches unit operations through application. Course topics includes: flow sheeting and block diagrams, practical design of heat exchangers, practical design of selected unit operations, siting and environmental assessment, use of process modelling software, process optimization.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203, CCE406, CCE407
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 1.5 - 4.5
Credit(s):
1

CCE433 Product Design

In this course students learn to develop new products. Steps in the product-development process are studied starting with determining the customer needs and ending with a detailed design. Students are taught how to find materials having desired properties and performance, and how to evaluate information from different sources. Optimization of the design and incorporation of novel technologies are also explored.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203, CCE305, CCE325, CCE406, CCE407, GEE231
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
2 - 2 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE437 Seminar

Technical, ethical, legal, environmental and safety topics are covered by seminars given by staff and invited speakers. Topics will be chosen to encompass and extend the technical subjects of the other courses so as to be useful to the working graduate engineer in the military.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemical Engineering, Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
0 - 0.5 - 0
Credit(s):
0

CCE440 Special Topics

This course will consist of topics selected from the subject areas of inorganic materials, polymeric materials, organometallic chemistry, molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry and corrosion, adsorption among others.

Note(s):
An elective for students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

CCE445 Materials in the Space Environment

The effects of the space environment on properties of various materials are studied. The impact of the space environment on metals, ceramics, polymers and composites is considered to include an examination of the design and performance requirements. Comparisons of the effectiveness of the various materials in space are reviewed.

Note(s):
For students of the taking Space Science.
An elective for students taking Honours Science or a Major in Science.
Not offered every year.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE218 or CCE253
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE450 Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

This course will examine the application of structural elucidation and synthetic methods to organic chemistry and the fundamental mechanistic concepts of organic reactions. The functions of enolate chemistry, functional group interconversions and pericyclic reactions in multi-step synthetic schemes will be introduced, as well as, the effects of the physical and electronic properties of the reactants and the solvent on reaction mechanisms. Case studies involving detailed studies of organic reactions and processes of industrial and economic importance will be used throughout this course. All of the concepts that are introduced in this course have been selected for students with prior knowledge of the structure and reactivity of organic compounds.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemistry
Prerequisite(s):
CCE247 and CCE248
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE451 Topics in Physical Chemistry

Kinetic theory: Maxwell distribution, collision theory, introduction to transport processes; Chemical kinetics: mechanisms, rate laws, temperature dependence, transition state theory; Surface chemistry: physisorption, chemisorption, adsorption isotherms, catalysis, surfactants, colloids, modern experimental methods; Polymers: structures, types, properties, polymerization mechanisms.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE309, CCE328
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE460 Biochemistry

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of biological compounds. A systematic study of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and their components is presented. Emphasis is placed on the broad understanding of chemical events in living systems in terms of metabolism and structure-function relationships of these biologically important molecules. Metabolism of these biological compounds is studied in terms of the generation and storage of metabolic energy. Principles of regulatory mechanisms involving these biological compounds are introduced.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101, CCE240
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE463 Engineering Aspects of CBRN Defence

The course will include an examination of the composition and biological action of classical nerve, blood, choking and blister agents, as well as detection and decontamination methods and antidotes available. Individual and collective protection measures will also be covered. Such biological agents as bacteria, viruses, fingi and rickettsia, as well as mid-spectrum agents to include toxins, venoms and bioregulators, will be addressed. Radiological weapons will be discussed in terms of variety and biological threat. The principles and characteristics of nuclear weapons will be introduced and related to the physical (thermal, blast) and nuclear radiation (initial, residual, TREE, EMP) effects on humans, structures and equipment. Particular attention will be paid to distance-yield relationships, the distribution of fallout, the characteristics and pathology of acute whole-body radiation, physical and biological dosimetry and radiological survey. In addition to the above topics, aspects of engineering design will also include issues of Chemical Weapons Convention verification, detection technologies and industrial-level chemical agent destruction.

Note(s):
An elective course for students taking Chemical Engineering.
This course will not be offered every year.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE203 CCE351
Exclusion(s):
ATWOP, LFTSP, CCE474
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE466 Environmental Chemistry

The objective of this course is to understand contemporary environmental issues and the chemistry and underlying scientific principles behind these issues. Sources and effects of air and water pollution, in addition to soil contamination will be covered in detail. The most common contaminant types will be presented and their properties and environmental fate discussed. Basic toxicology and risk assessment will be covered giving an understanding of policy development and current research efforts in the field. Green chemistry will be introduced and described via several examples. The concept of sustainability will be introduced and used to tie course concepts together under a single unifying theme.

Note(s):
An elective course for students taking Chemistry, Honours Science, or a Major in Science.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE468 Ammunition Seminar

Technical, ethical, legal, environmental, management and safety topics related to ammunition are covered by seminars given by staff and invited speakers. Topics will be chosen to encompass and extend the technical subjects of the other courses so as to be useful to the working graduate ATO students in the military.

Note(s):
For students taking the Ammunition Technical Officer programme.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
0 - 1 - 0
Credit(s):
0

CCE469 Ammunition Industrial Tours

The course objective is to expose students to practical application related to ammunition within private industry, the Canadian Forces and governmental and non-governmental agencies.

Note(s):
For students taking the Ammunition Technical Officer Programme.
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
0 - 1 - 0
Credit(s):
0

CCE470 Army Munitions and Weapon Systems

The theory of gun systems and ammunition for the attack of various targets is described. The focus is on the fundamental physical relationships guiding the design and use of guns and ammunition. The mounts, recoil systems, recuperators, breeches, manual and auto loading systems and sighting and fire control systems for a modern gun are described. The principles for the desired ballistic effect in the attack of targets are described, along with rules of thumb for successful attack. Other weapons, such as fragmenting munitions, demolition charges, and pyrotechnic devices are also reviewed. Unique packaging requirements are described.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the third or fourth year taking Arts
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE471 Air and Naval Munitions

The description of ships and aircraft as a target is reviewed, with a focus on the requirement for terminal effect of the weapon system. The design requirements for the attack of aircraft by guns and missiles, the attack of surface and subsurface vessels by torpedoes, depth charges, missiles and guns, and the attack of ground targets from the air are derived from basic principles. Fuzes and possible energy sources for initiation are described in some detail. The hazards of operation in an electromagnetic environment and the principles of mitigation are presented.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the third or fourth year taking Arts
Prerequisite(s):
CCE106 or CCE200
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE472 Introduction to Ammunitions Management

This course discusses a variety of topics involved with the management of ammunition and explosives, such as probability and statistics (e.g., applied to lot acceptance and the analysis of proof firings), risk reduction analyses and approaches, inventory management, decision analysis, and the Canadian defence procurement and life cycle management systems. Portions of the course will run concurrently with CC510 Ammunition management

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the third or fourth year taking Arts
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE473 Biological Agents

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to bioterrorism and biological warfare agents including bacteria, viruses and rickettsiae, as well as other disease-causing biological agents (e.g. toxins, venoms and bioregulators). History of use, targeting against humans, plants and animals, and specifics of clinical disease forms induced by exposure to the agents will be studied. Prophylaxis and treatment for the resulting diseases and the primary routes of dissemination of the agents will also be covered.

Note(s):
An elective course for students of the third or fourth year taking Arts.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE385 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered in the Fall or Winter (in a condensed block of two weeks).
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

CCE474 Molecular Mechanisms of Chemical and Biological Warfare Defence

This course will provide an in-depth examination of the science and engineering principles that are involved with the use of Chemical and Biological Warfare agents and the equipment utilized to support operations in these specific threat environments. Topics that will be covered in this class include synthesis and fabrication of CB agents, the physiological effect of each class of warfare agent, medical countermeasures and principles of decontamination and routes of dissemination and detection technologies. Students must have the necessary preparation in biochemistry and physical and organic chemistry as reflected in the prerequisites.

Note(s):
For students taking Honours Chemistry or a Major in Chemistry. 
Prerequisite(s):
CCE218, CCE240, CCE247 and CCE248
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 3
Credit(s):
1

CCE475 Environmental and Bioprocess Engineering

The objective of this course is to examine the sources, properties, fate and treatment of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes while understanding the basis of bioprocess engineering and how it relates to both industrial scale processing and environmental biotechnology. Water and wastewater treatment, solid waste disposal -including radioactive waste- and air pollution will be investigated. Contaminated site investigation procedures, environmental regulations and guidelines, and site remediation methods will be reviewed as will environmental management systems. Case studies and material from the current technical literature will be used to illustrate key points and applications. Basic microbiology concepts will be introduced to understand a range of bioprocesses including fermentation and pharmaceutical production. Bioprocess concepts will also be discussed in the context of environmental biotechnology.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemistry or Chemical Engineering.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 1 - 4
Credit(s):
1

CCE483 Ecotoxicology

Interactions among chemical exposure (e.g., pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, organic and inorganic pollutants) and organisms can lead to sub-lethal and lethal consequences. This course will explore the mechanisms of action of chemicals and the complexities of physiological responses in biota. Recent advances will be presented among selected topics: mutagenesis, genetic toxicology testing, DNA repair and recombination, genetic disease and cancers, endocrine disruption chemicals, bioaccumulation, oxidative stress, pharmacokinetics and/or developmental & reproductive toxicology.

Note(s):
For students taking Chemistry or Chemical Engineering.
Offered in French or English in alternating years.
Prerequisite(s):
CCE101, CCE240 (or equivalent)
Semester:
Usually Offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 4
Credit(s):
1
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