Course Descriptions | French Studies

Courses 100-199

FRF150 Communication écrite

This course is an introduction to written communication in French. In addition to increasing students' ability to recognize and employ good writing techniques, it aims to familiarize students with various types of writing ( resume, critical review, essay) and to explore strategies that facilitate writing across disciplines and genres.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
Students with pronounced problems in basic grammar and sentence structure are encouraged first to complete DEF050: Français correctif, a self-paced course that is non-credit.
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

FRF151 Cours de composition et d'introduction aux études littéraires

This course is divided into two parts. The first part examines grammar and writing; its goal is to develop the students' written French and their ability to present their ideas using a methodology-skills that will serve them well for all of the written work they will have to produce during their time at university. The second part of the course focuses on literature. Through the study of various literary works, a variety of literary genres from different centuries will be examined, providing students with a rich overview of French-Canadian literature during the first semester and of Francophone literature from outside Canada during the second semester. At the end of the year, students will have developed their ability to analyze, will recognize the characteristics of each of the literary genres taught, and will establish meaningful links between the literary works, and between literature and society.

Note(s):
Compulsory for students in their first year in Science or Engineering.
Semester:
Offered annually
Contact Hours:
4 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

FRF152 Cours de composition et d'introduction aux études littéraires I

This course is divided into two parts. The first part examines grammar and writing; its goal is to develop the students' written French and their ability to present their ideas using a methodology-skills that will serve them well for all of the written work they will have to produce during their time at university. The second part of the course focuses on literature. Through the study of various literary works, a variety of literary genres from different centuries will be examined, providing students with a rich overview of French-Canadian literature during the first semester and of Francophone literature from outside Canada during the second semester. At the end of the year, students will have developed their ability to analyze, will recognize the characteristics of each of the literary genres taught, and will establish meaningful links between the literary works, and between literature and society.

Note(s):
Compulsory course students in their first year in Arts.
Semester:
Offered annually
Contact Hours:
4 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

FRF160 Composition et introduction à la littérature canadienne-française I

This course introduces students to French-Canadian literature through certain texts that are typical of the following literary genres: drama, the novel, and the story/legend. French-Canadian texts are examined with special emphasis on their socio-historical background, character development, and themes. The course also aims at developing students' analytical minds, and at improving their writing skills and knowledge of grammar through production of written work.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
This is a Web-based course and is offered in French only.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF150 or equivalent
Semester:
Offered Annually
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

FRF161 Cours de composition et d'introduction à la littérature française I

This course introduces students to canonical texts in French literature. French literary works of various eras are studied; examined works will be mostly prose (novels, short stories, tales). Through a series of written assignments, the course will also increase students' skills in the organization and production of university-level written work.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
This course is offered in French only.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF160 or equivalent
Note(s):
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

Courses 200-299

FRF262 Cours de composition et d'introduction aux études littéraires - II

This one-year course is divided into two semesters. The first semester is dedicated to Francophone literature from outside Canada since the 16th century, and the second semester focuses on French-Canadian literature from the 20th century. For both semesters, literary works of various genres (narrative, poetry, drama, etc.) belonging to different cultural movements will be analyzed. The course situates the literary works in the historic period they were written in and that influenced them, and in the history of ideas that accompanies the development of literature and society. At the end of the year, students will know the important phases that led to cultural modernity, and will be able to connect these phases to historical and social factors or to philosophical notions. In addition, they will have honed their ability to analyze, write essays and conduct bibliographical research-highly useful skills that will serve them well for the rest of their university career.

Note(s):
All students must successfully complete FRF262 or its equivalent before taking a 300 or 400‑level course; however, if they obtain the approval of the Department Head, they may take FRF262 and a 300 or 400-level course concurrently.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF152 or equivalent. Students from RMC St-Jean must pass the Quebec government's French proficiency test, the 103 course and the GFA course; once they have successfully completed these prerequisites, they can take FRF262, otherwise they must retake FRF 151/FRF152.
Semester:
Offered annually
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

FRF264 Cours de composition et d'introduction à la littérature canadienne-française II

This course is a study of advanced writing techniques (explanatory essay) and an introduction to French Canadian literary movements and writers of the twentieth century. The aim of the course is to enable students, through their readings, to improve their analytical skills and to explore important Quebec and French Canadian literary works and movements, especially from a sociohistorical point of view.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
This course is offered in French only.
Prerequisite(s):
(FRF160 and FRF161) OR FRF151 or FRF152
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

FRF265 Cours de composition et d'introduction à la littérature canadienne-française II

This course is a study of advanced writing techniques (explanatory essay) and an introduction to French literary movements and writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The aim of the course is to enable students, through their readings, to improve their analytical skills and to explore important French literary works and movements, especially from a sociohistorical point of view.

Note(s):
Only offered through Distance Education.
FRF264 + FRF265 are the equivalent of FRF262.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF264
Contact Hours:
0 - 0 - 9
Credit(s):
1

Courses 300-399

FRF312 Regards croisés sur les littératures française et britannique (1850 -1900)

Characteristics: This course is to be offered conjointly by the Department of French Studies and the Department of English; it is to be team-taught by two professors, one from each of the departments. It will focus on comparisons of important aesthetic and cultural movements.

Through analyses of representative texts in French and English, this course will familiarize students with important aesthetic concepts of the second half of the 19th Century, enabling them to trace connections and divergences between the two cultures. At the end of the course, the students will not only be able to describe the interactions between the writers of the two worlds, but also to apprehend the differences in the understanding of aesthetic movements on either side of the Channel.

Note(s):
This course is designed for students in their third or fourth year of study in Arts (or at the discretion of the Departments of English and French Studies).
Prerequisite(s):
Please note also that it is strongly recommended that students enrolling in this course have attained at least a 'C' in the second language Reading Comprehension examination.
Semester:
Normally offered in Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF324 La littérature francophone subsaharienne des In dépendances à aujourd'hui

This course aims, through textual analysis and lectures, to provide the student with a deeper knowledge of the francophone literature of the sub-Saharan, especially that which deals with problems of post-colonial society. Through readings dealing with violence (Beti), dictators (Kourouma), child soldiers, the Rwandan genocide (Monénembo), immigration (Diome), etc., the student will acquire a better understanding of the stakes and mentality of certain areas of sub-Saharan francophone Africa. At the end of the course, the student will understand those forces which motivated various independence movements and the difficulties that resulted. The student will also acquire the basic tools which will allow him to reflect upon tribal wars, ethnic conflicts and genocide. He will also become familiar with literary representations of sub-Saharan francophone Africa. Finally, the student will be made aware of what literature can teach us about the limitations of the westernization of customs and mores and its unexpected consequences.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years. This course is intended for students in their third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF326 La littérature francophone du Maghreb et du Moyen-Orient, de la colonisation à nos jours

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to francophone literature of the Maghreb and of the Middle East through the study of their most representative works. This course will also allow the student to discover la francophonie arabe in general. The course will be divided into three parts: the first part will be devoted to writers of the colonial period; the second to texts written after the wars of independence; and the third to contemporary works. At the end of this course, the student will have gained a certain understanding of the uneasiness of certain intellectuals who employ the language of the colonizer while at the same time calling for independence. The student will also come to understand how such literature forces the writer to become un écrivain engagé, and how it of necessity turns into a vehicle for struggle, protest and demands for autonomy. The student will note the self-imposed role of the author as a righter of wrongs, specifically of the stereotyped Western vision of the history and society of the Middle East and of the Maghreb. He will also note the transformation of this literature from its roots in Arabic/Muslim communities to one which today is called upon to deal with current hot topics, such as the rise of fanaticism and the identity crises connected to immigration. Finally, the student will learn to recognize the literary and linguistic specificities of the works studied, all the while acknowledging them as products of the fusion of divergent cultures.

Note(s):
Offered in alternate years. This course is intended for students in their third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF331 L'expression de la guerre dans la littérature française

This course examines the portrayal of war and military life in French literature from the Middle Ages to the present as well as the works that had a determining influence on this literature. The works covered in the course include novels, short stories, memoirs and poems. Students will be required to participate in discussions, write an essay, give an oral presentation, etc.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF333 L'expression de la guerre dans la littérature canadienne-française

The course examines the portrayal of war and military life in French-Canadian literature, from the founding of New France to the present day. Emphasis is placed on the 20th century, especially the two world wars. The works covered in the course include novels, short stories, plays, memoirs and poetry. Students will be required to take part in seminar discussions, write a dissertation and make an oral presentation.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF334 La figure du sportif-guerrier dans la littérature québécoise

Using works by civilization sociologist Norbert Elias and sociocriticism, this course explores the methods through which the advent of sport in Quebec culture contributed to the symbolic transfer of violence (war, state, economic, identity) into the world of sport. By re-examining Quebec literature (poetry, novel, theatre, song) with a focus on sport heroes (e.g., Jos Montferrand, Maurice Richard and fictitious heroes), their motives and their social recognition, students will learn how literature is a space for conflict, negotiation and mediation, as exemplified through the world of sport. By analyzing the figure of the athlete-warrior in Quebec literature, students will be able at the end of the course to identify the means through which conflicts of identity and social tensions are resolved through sport.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151 or FRF152 or the equivalent.
Note(s):
Generally offered every two years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF335 Récits de militaires et d'explorateurs en Afrique de Napoléon à la Première Guerre mondiale

This course aims, through text analysis and lectures, to give students an in-depth knowledge of travel stories, war stories and memoirs that give accounts of the exploration of Africa from the Napoleonic era to World War I. Through reading works (essays, newspapers, treatises, memoirs) written by both military personnel and explorers, students will understand the ways in which the exploration of Africa and the mores of its various peoples were talked about. The writings of Caillié, Douville, Faidherbe, Binger, Gallieni, Brazza, Blanc and Foureau will be studied and compared to those of other explorers such as Barth, Nachtigal, Livingstone and Stanley. At the end of the course, students will have acquired a solid knowledge of the poetics specific to the exploration narrative and will be more skilled at analyzing written works in which authors attempt to describe cultures that are different from their own.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year. This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF337 Caractèristiques linguistiques du français québécois

This course examines, mainly from a synchronic perspective, the linguistic characteristics of modern-day Quebec French. More specifically, students will be introduced to the phonetic, morphological, syntactical and lexical particularities that distinguish Quebec French from standard French. Part of the course will be dedicated to different forms of Anglicization in each of the linguistic disciplines. At the end of the course, students will be able to assess the various differences between the Quebec variety of French and standard French and better understand how their language works.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF340
Note(s):
Generally offered every two years.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF339 Variété du français québécois

This course examines the characteristics of spoken French in Quebec by analyzing the underlying historical, political, economic and social contexts. Students will be introduced to joual and its influence on literature and everyday language. More specifically, they will evaluate the impact of anglicisms on Quebec French, the importance of establishing standards different from those of French in France, and the usefulness of descriptive dictionaries as distinct from conventional dictionaries. At the end of the course, students will be able to identify and determine the factors that have contributed to the development of the Quebec variety of French.

Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF344 Stylistique française I

This course primarily aims to improve students' discursive competency in writing through a variety of writing exercises and to give them the necessary knowledge to express their ideas clearly and accurately in different stylistic works using a precise and rich vocabulary. Students will learn to recognize and, where possible, appropriately use the most striking stylistic devices in the French language, which can be found in a wide range of documents such as newspaper articles, film reviews, literary works and even technical texts. The primary goal of the writing exercises is to teach students to adopt the style best suited to the function of the documents they produce.

Note(s):
Compulsory for all students who take the French Studies programme (Major or Minor). This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Corequisite(s):
FRF262 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered every Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF346 Stylistique française II

This course aims to give structure to what the students learned in level I about grammar and style and to put the students' syntactical skills into practice through a variety of literary writing exercises. The works of authors from the 19th and 20th centuries will be analyzed, particularly short stories. During this course, students will learn to recognize and apply the various registers while striving to polish the various stylistic and lexical nuances of French.

Note(s):
Compulsory for all students who take the French Studies programme (Major or Minor). This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Corequisite(s):
FRF262 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered every Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF347 Théories littéraires

The course aims, by the introduction to representative theoretical texts, not only at familiarizing the students with the important literary theories, but also at teaching them to choose the approach which suits best in a given work and in their own reading of a corpus. At the conclusion of this course, the student will understand, on one hand, that no theory is absolute and, on the other hand, that each allows to understand and to analyze the literary work according to a specific but not exclusive angle. This way, he can use the learnt methodological approaches during all his studies. The course will be divided into sequences, from two to three weeks, among which each will be dedicated to a particular theoretical approach in order to present its development and its current applications (structuralism, literary psychoanalysis, sociocriticism, narratology, deconstruction, theory of the reception, feminist theory, cultural and postcolonial studies, etc.)

Note(s):
It is strongly recommended to take this course during your second or third year in programme.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF151 or FRF152 or the equivalent.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF348 Approche historique et linguistique de la lange française I

This course introduces students to the major language classifications and goes on to explore the origins of French, particularly French in Canada. With the aid of the major 20th-century linguistic theories (structuralism, functionalism, generative grammar), students will become familiar with the terminology of descriptive linguistics and contemporary French grammar and will go on to concretely examine the foundations of the articulatory phonetic system of French.

Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF350 Approche historique et linguistique de la lange française II

This course is a theoretical and practical exploration of the major fields of modern linguistics: derivational and inflectional morphology, semantics, lexicography and syntax. Students will apply the knowledge they acquire to identify and analyze neologisms in everyday language in France and Quebec.

Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF353 Roman français du XIXe siècle

The objective of this course is to present the origins of the French novel and how it flourished during the 19th century. Through reading and interpreting the most representative works as well as lesser-known titles, students will gain in-depth knowledge of the genre, supported by various theories and poetics. Students will be able to give a precise definition of "novel" and describe the development of the trends and types of novels in the 19th century: Romanticism, realism, naturalism, decadence and fantastique. The course will also enable students to understand why, after a period of fame for its realism and naturalism, the novel would experience a crisis in the late 19th century and the early 20th century.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF355 Roman français du XXe siècle

This course is a study of the important phases that shaped the development of the novel in France in the 20th century through the study of a number of representative works. All of these works are striking in many respects, and they will be examined in relation to the art and thinking associated with each period; therefore, relevant cultural movements will be studied. Some of the topics that may be covered are the mise en abyme technique, which appeared in novels at the turn of the century; surrealism, which flourished during the interwar period; the notion of engagement, which took shape with World War II; existentialism; the Nouveau Roman, which developed in the 1950s and 1960s; contemporary novels written by women; and migrant literature.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in the their second third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF356 Rapprocher les deux solitudes: les littératures du Canada anglais et du Canada français

Characteristics: This course is to be offered conjointly by the Department of French Studies and the Department of English; it is to be team-taught by two professors, one from each of the departments. It will focus on comparisons of important aesthetic and cultural movements.

Through analyses of representative texts in French Canadian and English Canadian literature, this course will familiarize students with important aesthetic concepts in each of what Hugh LacLennen famously labelled "the two solitudes," enabling students to trace connections and divergences between the two cultures. Specific texts and topics will change year to year but may include canonical writers (such as Roy, Yves Thériault, Margaret Atwood, Leonard Cohen), and topics such as nationalism, war, economics, religion, gender, and narrative form.

Note(s):
This course is designed for students in the their third or fourth year of study in Arts (or at the discretion of the Departments of English and French Studies).
Prerequisite(s):
Please note also that students are permitted entry into this course only if they have attained a 'C' in the second language Reading Comprehension examination or equivalent.
Semester:
Normally offered in Winter
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF367 Poésie française du Moyen Âge à la Révolution

This course is a study of French poetry from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. We will examine the various movements that occurred over this long period -particularly the Pléiade, baroque and classicism and classicism -by situating the poetic works in their cultural context. Several literary beacons (such as Villon and Ronsard) will be studied in depth, but a number of other poets will also be looked at, and a variety of genres, registers and contents will be broached. A number of aspects will be emphasized-stylistic, prosodic, lexical, thematic, etc.-as well as their interrelation. Students will learn theory (linguistics, versification, etc.) and will learn to identify certain rhetorical techniques. While analyzing poetic works, sometimes comparatively, students will develop an aesthetic reflection on the nature of poetry by examining the understanding of not only the critics, but of the poets themselves.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF369 Poésie d'expression française depuis la Révolution

This course is a study of French poetry and other Francophone poetry from the French Revolution to the present. We will examine the 19th century, particularly romanticism, Baudelaire and symbolism; the Belle Époque, as the late 19th century and the early 20th century is called; the Esprit nouveau, which took shape with World War I; Dadaism and surrealism, which flourished in the interwar period; socially engaged poetry, which took shape with World War II; the voices of the French-speaking world, which resonated with many in the second half of the 20th century; and poetic songs, which have abounded in recent decades. Throughout this rich journey, links will be made with the visual arts: painting, sculpture and artistic photography.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF372 Théâtre médiéval et classique

This course will study medieval theatre, including farces and mystery, miracle and morality plays, French Renaissance theatre and classical theatre.

Cultural trips will be obligatory if circumstances and financial resources allow.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF373 Théâtre post-classique

This course will study post-classical drama in France. At the end of the term, students will be able to identify the different esthetically and ideological trends in French dramatic literature of the XVIIIth and XIXth centuries.

Cultural trips will be obligatory if circumstances and financial resources allow.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other in the Winter
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF375 Théâtre du XXe siècle

This course attempts to identify what it is that determines modernity in theatre, by examining a few texts--mostly dramatic, but some theoretical--that have marked the 20th century. At the end of the course, the student will know the major movements in theatrical aesthetics and make connections between dramatic, structural and thematic issues.

Cultural trips will be obligatory if circumstances and financial resources allow.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF376 La littérature française du Moyen Âge I

After a presentation of a number of sociohistoric elements and an overview of the birth of the French language, this course will examine French medieval literature from its origins (the Oaths of Strasbourg) up to the 13th century, dealing with the epic form (the Song of Roland), the novel of courtly love and knightly honour (Knights of the Round Table, the Story of the Grail), the fabliau and the chantefable (Aucassin and Nicolette). A study of various aspects of medieval life (society, pastimes, clothing, food, war, etc.) will complement the material.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF378 La littérature française du Moyen Âge II

This course follows FRF376 and addresses French literature of the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries. More specifically, we will be studying the inception of theatre as a literary form (religious plays, works of Adam de la Halle, Farce de ma être Pathelin), various forms of lyrical poetry (chanson de toile, jeu-parti, etc.), and important longer works such as Le roman de Renart and Le roman de la rose. The end of the Middle Ages brings us to the work of the man considered to be the first modern French poet: François Villon.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Prerequisite(s):
FRF376
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF379 L'Art oratoire

Through the analysis of texts, lectures, presentations and oratory performances, the course aims to offer students a theoretical and practical knowledge of various approaches and methodologies in the preparation and drafting of oral discourse. By reading treatises on oratory art, the students will learn the usual techniques that allow the oral transmission of thought in a convincingly natural and spontaneous manner. We will start from Antiquity, where the foundation of oratory art is found, then move to the study of different manuals of classical and modern oratory in order to familiarize the students with the great theories of the art of public speaking. At the end of the course, students will have acquired precise knowledge of the history of oratory art and of the means to better express themselves in public.

Semester:
Usually offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF381 Les Moralistes français du XVIe siècle

The aim of this course is to offer students a thorough knowledge of non-fictional prose of the 16th century from the Italian Wars to the Edict of Nantes through a combination of textual analysis and lectures. The main focus of this course, the Literature of Ideas, will be approached from different angles, focusing on understanding the different religious, literary, and philosophical principles to enable a better insight into the interactions of the perspectives of the time. Through close reading of diverse texts, students will understand the consequences of European Renaissance, the arguments typical to Protestantism, and the significance of the issues in the civil wars that devastated France during the second half of the century. At the end of the course, the student will have an understanding of the genres of the period (utopian fiction, the pamphlet, and the essay) and of other types of argumentation that are characteristic of this period of troubles and radical political transformations.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF383 Les Moralistes français du XVIIe siècle

The aim of this course is to give the students a thorough knowledge of French Literature of the 17th century. Through the reading and analysis of different texts that are on the margins of the traditional corpus of theater and poetry, the student will come to understand the consequences of the Wars of Religion and of the Edict of Nantes, the character of the numerous superstitions and occult beliefs that were very common during these times, the development of new philosophical principles, the modification of characteristic Christian beliefs, the impact of the concept of the honnéte homme on the idea of decorum, and the arguments that justified and then supported the establishment of Absolutism. At the end of this course, students will have acquired a better understanding of the issues that concern French literature between the assassination of Henri IV and the War of the Spanish Succession. They will have gain knowledge of the philosophy, maxims, fables, memoirs, and tales of the time, as well as an understanding of the characteristics of the types of discourse produced during the century of Louis XIV.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF386 La littérature française du siècle des lumières I

The aim of this course is to allow students to acquire an excellent understanding of the Literature of the Enlightenment. A series of lectures combined with textual analysis will help the students to gain insight and then deepen their understanding of historical concepts linked to the intellectual perspective of the Old Regime (Fénelon, Saint-Simon), as well as those linked to the protests of the authors of the Enlightenment (republic, anticlericalism, equality, etc.). Eighteenth century literature will be analyzed as a vehicle of ideologies that rest on a new philosophical conception in which human beings have become the foundation of knowledge (Montesquieu, Rousseau, Voltaire). During the semester, the student will acquire the aptitudes that will allow him to recognize and understand the thinking that led to the 1789 French Revolution. At the end of the course, students will understand the great axis on which the philosophy of Enlightenment is built: rejection of all values linked to the Old Regime, ambiguous return to the modes of thinking associated with classical antiquity (Montesquieu, Marmontel), belief in a natural religion (Rousseau, Mercier), and faith in the future as well as in progress (Turgot, Condorcet).

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF388 La littérature française du siècle des lumières II

The aim of this course is to analyze the periods preceding and subsequent to the French Revolution. Lectures combined with textual analyses and oral presentations will help deepen the knowledge of the factors that motivated the Revolution and of the changes in thinking that accompanied it. The discourses of the Encyclopedists (Diderot, d'Alembert) will be analyzed, as well as the licentious discourses of Diderot, Casanova, and Laclos. The course will also examine the views expressed against the practice of torture, on the appearance of the guillotine (Dr Guillotin and Beccaria), on the legalization of divorce (Brissot de Warville), on the cult of reason (Danton) and on the cult of the Supreme Being (Robespierre). It will also consider the views promulgated by the Catholic reactionaries (Joseph de Maistre, Chateaubriand and Vicomte de Bonald), that began to be published after Thermidor. During the semester, students will acquire the ability to recognize and understand different revolutionary and post-revolutionary attitudes.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF389 De l'influence de la littérature anglaise en France à l'époque des Lumières

This course, offered jointly as a "dialogue course" between the English Department and the French Department, will be team-taught by a professor from each department. The course will therefore include classes in English, alternating with classes in French concerning the influence of the English novels (by such authors as Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Jane Austen) on literature of the French Enlightenment, including their reception, their translation, and their adaptation, in a study of how the novels under consideration are invested with new meanings through translation. The student will come to recognize that translation functioned as a compromise between the two cultures rather than conforming to today's convention of linguistic and semantic equivalence.

Notes(s):
This course is designed for students in the their third or fourth year of study in Arts (or at the discretion of the Departments of English and French Studies).
Prerequisite(s):
Students are permitted entry into this course only if they have attained a 'C' in the second language Reading Comprehension examination or equivalent.
Semester:
One of the three bilingual courses will generally be offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

Courses 400-499

FRF413 Littérature européenne en traduction

This course examines European literature in translation by studying important works, literary movements, and large themes. While putting emphasis on the diversity of the literature in Europe (Spain, England, Italy, Russia, Germany, etc.), this course will show that definitions of literature and national literature are determined by the social status of the intellectual, of the literary critic and of literature within society. The course will study novels, poetry and drama from Europe, from a selection determined by the teacher, either on a national or on a transnational comparative scale. An important aspect of this course is to determine the place of the masterworks in the evolution of world literature. At the end of the course, students will be able to compare texts from other literary contexts, gain new perspectives in literary history, and explore literature through the lens of literary canons, genres, themes, and forms.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF415 Littératures non-européennes en traduction

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the study of non-European literature. Texts will be examined in their French translation. By studying important works, significant literary movements, and large themes, the course will analyze how national literatures are built and how literature is used in context outside the French-speaking literature. While stressing the diversity of literature (Americas, Africa, Asia, Oceania), this course will evaluate emerging literature in their relationship with the European canon. The course may study one region in particular or may elaborate a comparative study of two (or more) regions. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand masterworks originating from another language (English, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, etc.), to compare these works to the traditions of French-speaking literatures, to gain new perspectives in literary history, and to see the relative universality of canons, genres, themes, and literary forms.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF420 Le roman épistolaire

The course provides students an in depth knowledge of the epistolary novel at the end of the 17th century and during the Enlightenment through the study of its most representative works. The French novel underwent an important change in 1669 with the publication of Guilleragues' novel, Lettres d'une religieuse portugaise, comprised entirely of letters. This new narrative device, which became increasingly popular among novelists, legitimized the expression of love by concealing the identity of the author behind that of the letter writer, giving the impression of an actual eyewitness account. This course aims to define the epistolary novel, to analyse the issues inherent to the letter form novel, as well as to study major works of this genre, including Lettres de la marquise de M*** au comte de R*** (1732) by Crébillon fils, Lettres de Fanni Butlerd (1757) by Marie-Jeanne Riccoboni, Julie ou La Nouvelle Héloïse (1761) by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Caliste ou Lettres écrites de Lausanne (1788) by Isabelle de Charriére and Les Liaisons dangereuses (1782) by Choderlos de Laclos.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent.
Note(s):
Usually offered every other year, in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF422 Littérature de voyage

The objective of this course is to introduce students to two similar literary genres: the travelogue and the travel novel. Since the age of the Great Discoveries, the travelogue gave rise to increasing interest in France. While Paul Le Jeune and Jean de Brébeuf gave a written account of their travels to America, Jean Chardin and Jean-Baptiste Tavernier renewed the way in which the East was perceived. Anchored in reality, the travelogue, which claimed to be objective and transparent, served a double role: to portray the truth and to teach through description. The travelogue became a useful means to fight the accusations of improbability and puerility which weighed down the novel as a genre. This course seeks to define and describe travel literature, to analyse its issues, as well as to study major works of the period including travelogues such as Le Grand Voyage du pays des Hurons (1632) by Gabriel Sagard and Le Voyage autour du monde (1766-1769) by Bougainville, as well as travel novels including Espion turc (1694) by Giovanni Paolo Marana, Lettres persanes (1721) by Montesquieu, Lettres moscovites (1736) by Francesco Locatelli and Lettres d'une Péruvienne (1747) by Françoise de Graffigny.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent.
Semester:
Normally offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF426 Études dirigées avancées

This two-semester course is intended for fourth-year students doing an honours degree in French who obtained an average of A- or higher in their French Department courses in their third year. Before registering in this course, students must find a professor to guide them during both semesters, and they must receive the approval of the Department Head. This course is given in the form of guided readings. Students must produce either a significant quantity of written work or a single written piece of a substantial length on a specific theme. Students will develop their critical thinking skills and will use a number of theoretical works published in their area of research.

Note(s):
Usually offered annually. This course must be approved by the department head.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
2

FRF428 L'Essai au XXIe siècle : crise, terreur, paranoïa et sécurité intérieure

This course aims to impart to the student, by means of textual analyses and lectures, a greater knowledge of diverse currents that characterise the francophone essay since the beginning of the 21st century. Through readings of different essays and studies of the specific poetics of this literary genre, the student will become familiar with the ways in which the 21st century essay breaks today's world down into themes. The student will also gain greater awareness of society's profound transformations, its crises, its innovations and its catastrophes, which all contribute to the creation of a new apocalyptic "imaginaire", which can be defined by the loss of stable points of reference. Readings of various essays will allow us to study sequentially the discursive construction of new internal threats, different conspiracy theories, the topic of crisis as a way of interpreting the world, rhetorical anxiety-provoking situations and the stylisation of paranoia (Hofstadter). By the end of the course, the student will have acquired a thorough knowledge of the poetics of this genre as well as an enhanced ability to pinpoint and analyse recurrent themes by which the modern essay strives to make sense out of the 21st century.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF430 L'Échec des utopies dans la littérature française depuis la fin de la guerre froide

This course will examine how the issue of failed utopias is manifested in contemporary French literature since the end of the Cold War through the analysis of representative works. On the one hand, it will put into perspective the recent production by placing it in the history of utopian literary genre and its derivations dystopian. On the other hand, we seek to realize specific strategies implemented today by the writers to question the utopian, through various methods such as the registration referential in history, the fantastic storytelling or the use of science fiction. At the end of the course, students will have grasped the way in which literature can be an experiment of possibilities and thus reveal the potentialities contemporary.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s) : 1

FRF432 Le surréalisme

This course examines surrealism, the most significant cultural movement of the 20th century. It starts with a review of the 19th-century writers who were the forerunners of the movement and the dada phenomenon, where it all started. It then examines the founding works of André Breton and the key concepts found therein, but also the work of authors including Reverdy, Éluard and Desnos. In addition to looking at different literary genres, students will focus their attention on the visual arts-particularly photography, painting and sculpture-and on contemporary expressions of surrealism that can be found in advertising, film, etc. At the end of the course, students will have a strong understanding of the period during which surrealism flourished most strongly, the interwar period, as well as the movement's forerunners in the previous century and its many descendants today.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year. This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF434 Témoigner

This course aims, through lectures and text analysis, to study the poetics and aesthetics of testimony, from Jean Norton Cru (Témoins [witnesses], 1929) to the present, more specifically war testimony, workers' testimony, journalistic testimony and autoethnographic testimony. This course aims to give students in-depth knowledge of the art of testimony (narrative techniques, the work of memory, striving for coherence, effects of reality) and a better understanding of the polarity of opinions expressed in often contradictory testimonies regarding similar experiences. Students will grasp the issues that the various testimonies reveal and, through analyzing the tensions inherent in any recounted experience, gain a better understanding of the significance and the scope of testimonies.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year. This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF436 L'Absurde

This course will begin by examining the philosophical roots of the notion of "absurd" as they were expressed in the 19th century, such as Kierkegaard's "despair," and as they developed in the 20thcentury, such as Heidegger's "anxiety." But the main focus will be on the ways in which the notion was expressed by 20th-century writers. The works of Sartre and Camus will be of primary importance, in the three major literary genres they used: essays, stories and theatre. We will also examine the aesthetic change of direction that the absurd took after World War II, with the theatre of derision. At the end of the course, students will be able to identify the absurd in theoretical and fictional works and will be familiar with the different forms it has taken over time.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF438 Rétrospective sur un auteur

This course proposes to study various facets of the work of a single author, in the context of his/her time-frame. The choice of the author will depend upon the professor teaching the course that particular year. This course aims to present an in-depth perspective on the work of an author of French, Quebec or francophone literature in general. The author's work will be explored whenever possible by referencing at least two genres in which he/she has excelled. By the end of the course, the student, through study of complete works and representative excerpts, will discover the depth of the author's impact on the literature of his/her time and upon posterity. The student will learn in detail the literary currents associated with the author, as well as the distinctive characteristics of his/her writing and his/her thematic and stylistic preoccupations. Finally, this course will allow the student the opportunity to become familiar with the author's era, opening up further important historical, political and sociological considerations.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF440 Vie et mort des grands héros de l'Antiquité

This course is a study of the ways in which Greek and Roman writers of antiquity represent great heroes. At the end of the course, students will be familiar with the main classical models dealing with heroism and will be able to explain their relationship with mythology and philosophy. They will be able to recognize and analyze the parameters within which the concept of wartime heroism is formed and is justified in the epics of Homer and Virgil; the tragedies of Sophocles, Aeschylus and Euripides; and the works of Plutarch, Lucan, Apuleius, Caesar and Athanasius of Alexandria.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year. This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF442 La rhétorique d'Aristote à aujourd'hui

This course aims, through text analysis and lectures, to give students an in-depth knowledge of various concepts of rhetoric. Through reading different treatises and studies, students will become familiar with the ways in which rhetoric is defined, understand the nature of its components and sub-components, and learn the rhetorical and logical foundations of argument analysis. The rhetoric of Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, Ramus, Port-Royal, Lamy, Dumarsais and Fontanier, along with the New Rhetoric, will be examined from various angles in order to understand how this discipline has developed through the ages. At the end of the course, students will have learned what characterizes ethos, logos, pathos, syllogism, enthymeme, hypotyposis, topos, paralogism, etc., so as to better analyze the way in which persuasive speeches are constructed.

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year. This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF453 Le roman canadien-français avant la Révolution tranquille

This course is a study of the development of the French-Canadian novel before the Quiet Revolution. After discussing a few basic historical and theoretical principles, we will examine the novels that mark the important phases of this development. Emphasis will be placed on themes and ideologies in a sociohistoric context.

Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF455 Le roman canadien-français depuis la Révolution tranquille

This course is a study of the new directions that the Quebec novel has taken in the wake of the sea change brought about by the Quiet Revolution. We will focus on the expression of a new nationalist sentiment in novels. We will cover the concept of the socially engaged writer, new styles of writing, the emergence of women's writing and, above all, the growing importance of migrant literature. This will lead us to reconsider the relationship between the various literatures of French-speaking Canada in the context of minority literatures.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF460 L'écriture au féminin sous l'Ancien Régime

This course will study the writings of women during the Ancien Régime. From Marguerite de Navarre to Mme de Genlis, many women writers, including Mme de Villedieu and Marie-Jeanne Riccoboni, to name only a few, tried to establish themselves as authors. Through a close reading of diverse texts - including fairy tales, short stories and novels - students will understand the conditions women authors faced and the reception of their works. They will be able to analyse the main themes raised in the works studied, to identify the strategies used to question the place of women in society and to formulate a critical reflection on the publications of women writers from the Renaissance to the French Revolution.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF466 Poésie canadienne-française - I

This course is a study of Quebec poetry from its origins up to the mid-20th century. After reviewing the beginnings of written poetry in French Canada, we will examine Quebec poetry specifically: the Literary and Patriotic Movement of Quebec; the Montreal literary school; the regionalist poets and the exotic poets, including the argument that brought them into conflict; and lastly, the solitude generation. We will situate these poetic movements in their respective sociocultural contexts and will see the role they played in the community. Their aesthetic characteristics will also be pointed out. To accomplish this, we will study numerous representative poets, but will look at a few of them more closely, such as Nelligan, DesRochers, Saint-Denys Garneau and Grandbois.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF468 Poésie canadienne-française - II

This course is a study of French-Canadian poetry, principally Quebec poetry, since the publication of Refus global in 1948. The movements and periods we will examine include automatism, including the works of Claude Gauvreau, Paul-Marie Lapointe and Roland Giguère; poésie du pays [Quebec nationalist poetry], including the works of Paul Chamberland, Gérald Godin, Gaston Miron and Michèle Lalonde; formalism and feminism, including the works of Nicole Brossard and France Théoret; the counterculture and more contemporary poetry. We will analyze the often close relationship between the poet and society. Also, we will draw parallels with French poetry and the visual arts. Lastly, we will focus our attention on songs.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF470 Théâtre canadien-français - I

After an overview of the history of drama in French Canada, this course will study the real development of this literary genre from 1950 to 1970. The plays of some major playwrights will receive particular attention.

Cultural trips will be obligatory if circumstances and financial resources allow.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall .
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF472 Théâtre canadien-français II

This course will study dramatic production in French Canada since 1970.It will show the diversity and originality of that production through the works of important playwrights.

Cultural trips will be obligatory if circumstances and financial resources allow.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF474 La littérature française de 1945 à 1980

This course aims to provide students a better understanding of the profound changes taking place in the field of French literature in the aftermath of World War II which determined the shape of contemporary literature in France.

Through a detailed study of several important literary movements such as the OuLiPo, and through specific examples from the "age of suspicion" inaugurated by the Nouveau Roman to the death of the two great figures Roland Barthes and Jean-Paul Sartre, this course will capture the innovations developed by writers of that time, in terms of poetics and theory, by situating them in their context.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF476 La littérature française de 1980 à aujourd'hui

This course offer students an in depth understanding of current French literature, as well as an understanding of the issues to the contemporary era, not only within the study of literature, but also outside its boundaries.

The 1980s saw a new generation of writers appear, which, although they inherited from the formalists and experimental novels of their predecessors, as well as from their theoretical concerns, implemented a return to the notion of story and to the traditional novel. This shift also concerns the practice of the previous generation of writers, whose writing also tends to become transitive, with different aesthetic modes.

The course will begin by focusing on this turning point and by offering a portrait of the following thirty years. Several major works of this time will then be considered, while particular attention will be paid to the innovations that characterize their relationship with reality.

Prerequisite(s):
FRF151, FRF152 or equivalent
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF478 Les liens entre la littérature française et les arts (arts plastiques et musique)

This course aims to reveal to the student the multiple connections between literature and other art forms. Through study of literary works of fiction and works of art criticism, the student will, by the end of the course, come to an understanding of the love-hate relationship between authors and artists (common esthetic movements, solidarity or rivalry between different arts and between artists, etc.). Moreover, the student will observe the functions and representations of work of art as integrated into the literary text (Hugo's Gavroche taken from Delacroix's La liberté guidant le people, Vinteuil's sonata as it appears in Proust's Un amour de Swann, for example) and will describe the manner in which writing itself aspires to become a work of art (the sculptural solidity of a work of literature for the Parnassiens, the cathedral-like structure of Proust's writings, for example).

Note(s):
Usually offered every other year. This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF483 Civilisation canadienne-française avant le XXe siècle

This course provides an overview of the development of the major currents of thought in French Canada, from the beginning of the colony (writings of New France) up to the eve of the 20thcentury. Emphasis will be placed primarily on the different themes and ideologies in a sociohistoric context, and the importance of the narrative style of the works will also be considered. We will look at the birth of numerous literary genres: essay, travel writing, poetry, drama, story and novel.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF485 Civilisation canadienne-française de 1900 à nos jours

This course picks up where FRF483 leaves off. Students will continue to examine written works that reveal a collective identity, both inside and outside Quebec; naturally, the universal scope of the themes and ideologies that developed will also be considered. We will focus our attention on narrative prose (stories and novels), popular music and the work of a number of stand-up comedians, to illustrate the development of nationalist thought.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF493 Littérature canadienne-française hors Québec

An introduction to the diverse manifestations of French-Canadian literature outside Québec. A study of French-Canadian culture---especially Acadian, Franco-Ontarian and Franco-Manitoban--- through their literary works. After a brief look at the history of the French presence in Canada, we will examine the sociopolitical and cultural connections between the French minorities of l'Acadie, of Ontario and of western Canada and, inevitably, the relationship of these minorities with Quebec. Special attention will be given to the literary concept of l'exiguïté, in connection with the search for identity and with the evolution of these minorities in the context of multiculturalism.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Fall
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

FRF495 La francophonie dans le monde

This course will study the literature and culture of francophone societies outside France, Canada and Africa. More specifically, it will concentrate on the literature of the Americas (Antilles, Louisiana), of Europe (Belgium, Switzerland) and of French Polynesia (New Caledonia). It will analyze the evolution of these literatures and, if need be, of the oral traditions particular to the culture studied. A main theme of this course will be the sometimes problematic relationship of these literatures with metropolitan France. The goal of the course is to lead the student to a better understanding of lesser known francophone cultures.

Note(s):
This course is intended for students in their second, third or fourth year of study.
Semester:
Usually offered every other year in the Winter.
Contact Hours:
3 - 0 - 6
Credit(s):
1

French Studies

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