Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Graduate Studies

Contacts

Department Head
Dr. Danny Pagé
Professor-in-Charge of the Chemical Engineering Programme
Dr. Juan Beltrán
Graduate Studies Committee Chair
Dr. Emily Corcoran
Telephone
613-541-6000 ext. 6271
Fax
613-542-9489
Web Page
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Course Descriptions

General Information

Programmes Offered

The Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering offers the Master's and PhD degree programmes with specialty fields in Chemical and Materials, Environmental, and Nuclear, in Engineering or Science.

The Masters and Doctoral Programmes with the specialty field of Environmental Engineering are offered jointly with the Department of Civil Engineering. A sub-committee of the two departmental graduate studies committees administers this programme.

The Department's graduate research programme is closely affiliated with and supported by numerous DND agencies and directorates. Many thesis topics are offered as a result of this collaboration and are arranged between the sponsor and the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

Current areas of activity with associated sponsors include among others:

  • testing of Nuclear Biological Chemical protective equipment (DSSPM, DRDC),
  • investigating nuclear emergency response techniques, safety and radiation fields at high aircraft altitudes (DGNS, J3NBC, DCGEM, DRDC),
  • studying integrated health monitoring techniques of aircraft engines and developing Expert Systems (DASEng, AMDU, DREA, DRDC),
  • fuel cells (DRDM),
  • electrochemical power sources including submarine work (DMEE, DRDA, DGIEM, DGMEM, DASP, DRDC),
  • investigating corrosion resistance of coatings and nondestructive evaluation techniques (DASEng),
  • characterizing armoured materials and silicon carbide ceramics (DRDC),
  • developing dye penetrants for use in search and rescue operations (DRDC, Search and Rescue),
  • developing new procedures for environmental site assessment and remediation (DGE, DIAND),
  • developing novel analytical techniques to support environmental engineering studies (NWSO),
  • applying biotechnology methods (bioremediation phytoremediation) for treatment of contaminated soils (DGE, DISU, DIPM, Env. Canada), and
  • studying new approaches for ecological risk assessment (DGE, NWSO).

Other areas of activity may be arranged within the broad spectrum of expertise in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. The specialty fields of research are Chemistry, Chemical and Materials Science, Environmental Science, Nuclear Science, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

Graduate research may be pursued in the following areas:

Chemical And Materials Science / Chemical And Materials Engineering

  • carbons as adsorbents
  • air quality control
  • life support systems
  • pigments for visible radiation therapy of diseases
  • development and testing of NBC protective gear
  • decontamination, detection and monitoring chemical agents
  • electrochemical power sources and batteries
  • hydrogen production, purification and storage
  • fuel cell development for applications in submarines and military bases
  • liquid fuels purification processes
  • catalytic chemical reactions
  • explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics
  • aerosol and vapour dispersion
  • terminal ballistics
  • artificial intelligence applications
  • corrosion of alloys in aircraft frames, marine systems and armoured materials
  • calculation of phase diagrams from thermochemical data
  • non destructive evaluation, materials management and expert systems
  • polymer systems
  • composite materials
  • ceramics, high temperature superconductors, solid electrolytes and solid lubricants
  • aircraft engine wear monitoring (quantitative filter debris analysis)
  • analytical chemistry and radiochemistry
  • chemical kinetics
  • chemical thermodynamics of new materials and advanced technologies
  • surface chemistry
  • x-ray crystallography
  • vibrational, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy
  • synthesis of therapeutic agents
  • solid state chemistry of inorganic materials

Environmental Science / Environmental Engineering

  • environmental assessment; impact and risk assessment
  • remediation technologies
  • environmental standards and guidelines
  • monitoring programmes and pollution prevention
  • environmental analytical chemistry - especially pertaining to effective field testing
  • biotechnology - bioremediation and phytoremediation
  • sanitary engineering
  • toxic water management
  • water resources management
  • site remediation
  • subsurface contaminant transport
  • ecological risk assessments

Nuclear Science / Nuclear Engineering

  • radiochemistry and neutron activation analysis
  • radiation effects on materials
  • neutron radiography and radioscopy
  • nuclear reactor analysis and design
  • fuel cycles and fuel management
  • neutron and gamma bubble dosimetry
  • nuclear fuel and fission product release behaviour response
  • artificial intelligence applications to nuclear systems
  • health physics and radiation protection
  • nuclear accident response
  • nuclear radiation detection and measurement

Admission

Candidates for the degrees; Master of Science, Master of Applied Science, Master of Engineering or Doctor of Philosophy will be admitted under the general admission requirements. Details regarding admission to the Royal Military College as a graduate student can be found in the Admission to Graduate Studies section of this calendar

Programme Requirements

The Master's of Engineering degree will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of eight (8) term courses at the graduate level plus a project.

Note

The academic portion of the Occupational Speciality Specification (OSS) AEXO, Advanced Ammunition Engineering qualification, is comprised of the following courses: CC508, CC510, CC512, CC514, CC551, CC561, CC577, CC579 and PR500. It is expected to be completed in one calendar year (12 months).

The Master of Science degree or the Master of Applied Science degree will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of five (5) lecture courses at the graduate level plus a thesis. The degree when pursued full-time in the residential programme normally requires five (5) academic terms or two (2) academic years plus the intervening summer to complete.

The Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental, Nuclear, and Chemical and Materials Science or Engineering, will be awarded to candidates who successfully complete a programme of studies normally comprised of at least eight (8) lecture courses, at the graduate level, plus a thesis.

Course Descriptions

CC501 Chemical And Nuclear Engineering Computations

The topic of this course are selected to suit applications in Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. The central theme of the course is the mathematical formulation of various engineering problems. Ordinary and partial differential equations, boundary-value problems, matrix operations and various mathematical modelling and simulation techniques are covered. Numerical optimization techniques are introduced. Analytical and numerical methods of solution are used, both workstation and/or micro-computer being employed for the latter.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC502 Polymer Welding and Joining

Technologies used to weld and join thermoplastic and thermoset parts are reviewed. Topics include mechanical (self-taping screws, boss design, snap-fits), chemical (adhesives) and thermal (ultrasonic, vibration, hot-plate, resistance and laser welding) assembly techniques. Theoretical and practical aspects of these techniques are covered. The course consists of a series of lectures, class projects and laboratories using pilot scale welding equipment.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one semester)
Credit(s):
1

CC503 Special Topics

The topics of this course are adjusted to the specific requirements of the candidates. For instance, typical complementary topics for Master of Nuclear Engineering candidates would include corrosion, electrochemistry, water chemistry, certain separation processes such as ion exchange, filtration, absorption, solvent extraction and water desalination, and, for certain candidates, chemical equilibria and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC504 Seminar

This is a required seminar course for candidates for a Masters degree. The seminar, presented by the candidate in either official language, is expected to relate to the research programme of the candidate. The seminar is to be primarily directed to members of the department, be approximately 35 minutes in duration, and include sufficient background to effectively communicate with non-specialists in the research area. The candidate will be expected to field a range of questions from the audience after the presentation. A complementary written version must accompany the seminar. This is expected to be approximately 30 pages and be prepared in the style of a submission to a refereed journal in the field of study. The date of the seminar and standards for the presentation of the written version will be decided in conjunction with the supervisor(s). Written versions of the seminar will be made available afterwards to those who so request. Candidates will be graded on their oral delivery and content by at least three graduate faculty members. The written version will be graded by the research supervisor(s). Candidates deemed to have not succeeded will have the opportunity to give a second seminar prior to a failing grade being submitted.

Credit(s):
1

CC506 Molecular Modelling and Applications to Nanotechnology

This course illustrates the concepts of molecular modelling from first principles. The first part of the course will include a detailed presentation of quantum chemistry and molecular mechanics as fundamental and essential theories for the development of molecular modelling models. The course will also describe the first principle based models such as Hartree-Fock, Density Functional Theory, Moller Plesset Perturbation Theory complemented by a description of the molecular mechanics based methods. The applications of molecular modelling will be discussed for novel fields such as nanotechnology for prediction of self-assembly of soft materials, semi-conductors properties and dynamical properties.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC508 Sea and Air-Launched Munitions

This course examines the design considerations for munitions to defeat a variety of targets, including the attack of aircraft by guns and missiles, the attack of surface and subsurface vessels by torpedoes, depth charges, missiles and guns, the attack of ground targets, fuse designs, explosive devices such as aircraft ejection seats and thermal decoys, and packaging requirements for storage and handling. Foreign CBRN munitions will also be discussed.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC509 Nuclear Reactor Heat Transfer

Advanced topics in conduction, forced convection, natural convection and boiling heat transfer applied to nuclear fuel and nuclear reactor design; heat transfer characteristics of various coolants, moderators, nuclear fuels and reactor materials; problems in thermal design of nuclear power reactors.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC510 Ammunition Management

This course discusses a variety of topics involved with the management of ammunition and explosives, such as probability and statistics (e.g., applied to lot acceptance and the analysis of proof firings), risk reduction analyses and approaches, inventory management, decision analysis, and the Canadian defence procurement and life cycle management systems.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC511 Health Physics and Radiation Protection

The radiation emitted from natural and man made sources is reviewed and the units and terminology employed in radiation measurement and protection are outlined. The biological effects of radiation are covered by introducing elementary biology and reviewing studies and experience with radiation exposures. The risks of employing radiation are considered and the recommendations of various groups and reports on radiation standards are consulted. The exposure, absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and their rates are calculated for various situations and the principles employed in minimizing these levels are discussed. Present activities of organisations working with and responsible for radiation are reviewed.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC512 Ammunition Management

This course will examine the design of munitions launched from ground-based platforms. Specific topic areas to be covered will include the attack of heavy and light armoured vehicles by kinetic and chemical warheads, armour designs to protect vehicles, the attack of aircraft (fixed and rotary wing) the attack of structures and bunkers and the attack of personnel, including body armour designs and wound ballistics. Other topics will include the design of grenades and fragmenting munitions, mines, demolitions, improvised explosive devices, precision munitions, fuse designs, pyrotechnic devices and packaging requirements for storage and handling. This course replaces CC549 Terminal Ballistics.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC513 Corrosion Engineering - Diagnosis of Corrosion and Corrosion Testing

The course consists of a review of corrosion related chemistry and electrochemistry with an introduction to corrosion-related failure. Diagnostic elements of corrosion phenomena, analysis of failures, dissection of observations and simple on-site tests are discussed. Laboratory corrosion testing, electrochemical techniques and corrosion monitoring are also covered.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC514 Weapons Systems

This course will involve the design considerations of navy, army and air force weapon systems. Specific topics will include navy gun and missile systems, army armoured vehicle gun and cannon systems, towed and vehicle-mounted indirect fire systems (including mortars), small arms (including machine guns) and guided weapons, and air force gun and missile systems. Gun systems will comprise the design and analysis of mounts, recoil systems, recuperators, breeches, manual and auto loading systems and sighting and fire control systems. Missile systems will comprise launch, guidance and control systems.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC515 Nuclear Detection and Measurement

This course is presented as a series of lectures and accompanying laboratory experiments. Radiation, their sources and interactions with materials, are reviewed. The principles employed in radiation detection are described with emphasis on survey techniques and nuclear electronics. Gas-filled detectors (ionization, proportional, Geiger), scintillation and semiconductor detectors are discussed, followed by neutron detectors and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The principles of operation, characteristics, types and applications are indicated for each detector method. Factors affecting detectors such as statistics, background and shielding are included.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC516 Nanotechnology: Theory, Applications and Characterization Methods

This course presents the theory and different interactions leading to the organization and precise assembly of molecules for nanotechnology applications. The concepts of layer-by-layer self-assembly, self-assembly of polymers and nanolithography are presented. The course also describes the different methods used for the characterization of the nanostructures; Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray/Neutron scattering and diffraction, and Simulation. The concepts are discussed and illustrated using scientific literature.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC517 Shielding for Nuclear Activities

The shielding required for equipment employing radioisotopes likely to be encountered by military personnel (radiography, calibration sources, tritium lighting, nuclear reactors, weapons explosions, etc..) is examined. The principles of operation are outlined with emphasis on the radiations emitted, and thermal and blast effects on personnel and equipment in the case of weapons explosions. The safety measures taken in the design and operation of this equipment are also studied. Radiation shielding is covered by determining the radiations, source geometry, energy spectrum, build-up factors and shielding purpose encountered in typical applications. Shielding calculations are then made for specific situations by various methods, including the latest software codes.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC518 Advanced Thermodynamics

Postulates and calculus of classical thermodynamics. Fluid phase equilibria and phase stability. Equations of state and their use to determine fluid properties for pure components and mixtures. Selected topics in phase diagrams. Time permitting and depending on the class interests, specific advanced topics in advanced thermodynamics may be included in the course.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC520 Transport Phenomena

The course gives on overview of the field of transport phenomena including heat transfer, mass transfer, and fluid mechnics at the graduate level. Emphasis is made on the fact that the basic equations that describe these three modes of transport are closely related. Scaling analysis is introduced. Depending on the class interests, specific advanced topics in chemical, environmental or nuclear engineering may be included in the course.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC521 Introduction to Nondestructive Evaluation

Principles, equipment, techniques and standards for various non-destructive tests will be covered. Radiography, magnetic penetrants, other penetrants, ultrasonics, eddy current and other more specialized techniques will be included. Lectures - 3 periods per week (one term)

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC522 Applied Experimental Design and Data Analysis

The methodology for developing efficient experimental plans for reduced experimentation and maximum informational output will be presented, and the use of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression models for data analysis emphasized. Multivariate analysis methodologies including cluster analysis, use of correlation matrices, principle component analysis (PCA), and partial least squares (PLS) regression will be presented with a focus on applied data analysis and industrial process optimisation. Data distributions including normality and homoscedasticity will be discussed in the context of analysis methodology assumptions and the use of transformations for data analysis covered.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC523 Nuclear Reactor Engineering

The course is introduced by discussing future world energy requirements. The first part of the course then covers interaction of radiation with matter, detection and shielding, radiation safety and reactor classifications, components and materials. In the second part, operation and control of nuclear reactors are described, including reactor kinetics and dynamics, control devices, poisons and chemical shim. Reactor safety, risk analysis, reactor accidents, radiation from effluents and licensing are covered.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC525 Nuclear Reactor Safety

The following safety aspects of nuclear power reactors are discussed, including reactor licensing and regulation in Canada and in other countries, basic principles of reactor safety, engineered safety features in nuclear power reactors, reactor safety analysis, reliability and risk assessment; reactor accidents at civilian power plants (Chernobyl; Three Mile Island and elsewhere) and in nuclear-powered vessels, radiation dose calculations; nuclear emergency response, and fission product release and severe core damage phenomena.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC527 Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

The nuclear reactor at transient state is studied in this course, first through the point kinetics model for which solutions of the resulting equations for various reactivity variations are calculated. The feedback effects and the various reactivity coefficients due to the temperature and void fraction, among others, are then covered. This leads to the introduction of the control theory applied to feedback systems, and to the analysis of stability conditions. Advanced kinetics theory elements are presented, including non-point theory models, space-time models, adiabatic and quasistatic approaches, modal and nodal formalisms. Analytical and numerical solutions are introduced and applied in cases such as safety analyses.

Prerequisite:
CC523 Nuclear Reactor Engineering
Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC528 Advanced lnorganic Chemistry

This course will cover topics in inorganic chemistry at the graduate level. The course will begin with a general review of the fundamentals of ligand field theory and the nature of bonding in transition and main group metal complexes. Inorganic chemistry is a wide field and special topics may include in-depth studies in the areas of coordination chemistry (including magnetism and metal organic frameworks), bioinorganic systems (such as the function, mechanism, and toxicity of inorganic elements in biological systems), organometallics (both for transition and main group metals), and/or homogeneous catalysis (catalytic mechanisms and industrial applications).

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC531 Radiological Methods

Radiological techniques utilizing X-ray, gamma ray and neutron radiation will be covered. Their sources, interactions and imaging will be studied. Light alloys such as found in aircraft and film imaging will be emphasized. Other techniques such as real-time imaging, data analysis and tomography will be compared and the evaluation of image quality and sensitivity will be studied. Radiometry, diffraction and X-ray fluorescent techniques will be briefly covered. Radiation safety will also be addressed.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC533 Nuclear Fuels Engineering

This course covers the physical, chemical, mechanical and nuclear properties of nuclear fuels. The fuel cycle is examined from mining, fabrication, and enrichment through to reprocessing and disposal. The behaviour of the fuel as it resides in the nuclear reactor is considered including its thermal and chemical characteristics. Fission product behaviour and fuel defect mechanisms are studied for normal reactor operation, and severe fuel damage phenomena are described for nuclear reactor accident conditions.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC537 Site Remediation

An introduction is given to the techniques available for removing chemical and nuclear contamination from polluted sites. The course will focus on currently available methods, but will also address techniques under development for the remediation of soil, air and groundwater. Topics will include bioremediation, phytoremediation, thermal remediation, containment and stabilization, and chemical extraction methods. A study of the legislative framework and costs associated with site remediation will be an important part of the course. Emphasis will be placed on assessing the feasibility and relative advantages of the available methods for a given site. This course will be taught using a combination of lectures, case studies and seminars.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC539 Applied Analytical Chemistry

This course will cover environmental sampling methods, quality assurance principles and applications, and statistics as they pertain to analytical chemistry. Environmental sampling will include soil, water, and biota sampling applied to environmental assessment, risk assessment and research. Quality assurance and statistics topics complementing the environmental sampling methods, as well as from the perspective of a commercial laboratory setting will be discussed. Methods of analysis, both field and laboratory, will be described for the most common environmental contaminants, and this information will be used to discuss the applicability and limitations of data thus obtained. A hands-on training session with field equipment for the analysis of PCBs, TPH and inorganic elements will be included.

Lectures:
3 periods a week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC541 Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment

This course will review the environmental and human health effects of the major classes of environmental stressors, both proven and putative. Quantitative risk assessment, and prioritization of action on its basis, will be key considerations, as will the development of abatement criteria and actual abatement strategies. The course will include technical aspects of risk assessment and will consider the practical realities facing the practitioner and policy maker.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC543 Atmospheric Dispersion and Micrometeorology

This course examines two major areas: the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the behaviour of aerosols and gases within the ABL. Specific topics include the composition and structure of the earth's atmosphere within the ABL, transport processes and balances, temperature and moisture distributions, stability and turbulence, properties of atmospheric gases, boundary layer flows and similarity theory. General modelling approaches are also discussed. The second area, aerosols, includes the transport of chemicals in the ABL, size distributions and removal processes of atmospheric aerosols, and aerosol dynamics. Specific aerosol systems will also be considered, and can be adjusted somewhat to meet students' interests, such as the possible aerosol release during nuclear reactor accidents or the dispersion of military aerosols. Use will be made of appropriate computer models.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC545 Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

This course will examine the application of structural elucidation and synthetic methods to organic chemistry and the fundamental mechanistic concepts of organic reactions. The functions of enolate chemistry, functional group interconversions and pericyclic reactions in multi-step synthetic schemes will be introduced, as well as, the effects of the physical and electronic properties of the reactants and the solvent on reaction mechanisms. Case studies involving detailed studies of organic reactions and processes of industrial and economic importance will be used throughout this course. All of the concepts that are introduced in this course have been selected for students with prior knowledge of the structure and reactivity of organic compounds.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC547 Artificial Neural Network Modelling

This course will cover a range of artificial intelligence topics with examples of how they may be applied to engineering problems. Specific topics may be tailored to meet students' needs, but will be drawn from artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, knowledge-based systems, case-based reasoning and expert systems. Applications will cover such areas as prediction, classification and control problems as well as knowledge elicitation and representation for improved knowledge reuse. Students will be required to solve problems using either commercial software packages or their own code. Although the mathematical foundations of the various topics will be covered, emphasis will be placed on their applications to engineering problems (especially within a chemical, nuclear or materials engineering environment).

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC551 Propulsion in Guns and Rockets

This course discusses the characteristics and design considerations of solid rocket fuels and gun propellants. Specific topics include grain design, composition and additives to control burning rates, the chemistry and thermodynamics of primers, igniters and propellants, generation and distribution of chamber and bore pressures, form factors and equations of state, barrel wear and heat transfer, pressure waves, liquid gun propellants, light gas and electric guns, combustible cartridge cases, and muzzle gases. Use will be made of appropriate computer models.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC555 Environmental Issues

This course will examine current, and specific, environmental issues in both science and engineering. Topics will be drawn from the areas of contamination, site remediation, ecological risk assessment, landfill techniques, groundwater contamination, human health and the environment. The course will be co-taught by professors from RMCC and Queen's University and will also feature speakers who are experts in the topic areas. Students will be required to develop specific topics in both written and oral format and will also be required to, participate fully in all discussions. It is anticipated that all students will benefit from the multidisciplinary content of the course and will be better prepared to appreciate environmental problems from a broad perspective. It should be stressed that, although a broad range of topics will be covered, students will be expected to demonstrate specific knowledge of their area of focus.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC559 Terminal Ballistics 2 - Impact Mechanics

This course will examine the mechanics and dynamics of the impact of armour materials (steel, aluminium, ceramics, glass and composites) in various geometric configurations by long rod and spin stabilized penetrators, shaped charge jets and explosively-formed projectiles. The course material will expand upon subject matter covered in CC549 Terminal Ballistics. Specific topics include physical and material considerations for both penetrators and targets, non-penetrating impacts, the attack of semi-infinite targets, plate penetration and perforation, and behind armour effects. Use will be made of appropriate computer codes.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC561 External Ballistics

This course will examine the flight of projectiles and missiles. Specific topics will include compressible flow and the generation of shock waves, projectile stability for finned and spun projectiles, range enhancements, such as base bleed and rocket assist, vacuum trajectories and aerodynamic drag, the effects of wind, rotation of the earth and coriolis forces. The point mass, modified point mass and six degree of freedom models will also be addressed in the context of small and large calibre rounds. Use will be made of appropriate computer codes.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC563 Polymers in Engineering Applications

The course consists of the following topics: polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity, yield and fracture, reinforced polymers and polymer processing. Engineering applications will be illustrated throughout the course.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC565 Nuclear and Radiochemistry

The following topics on the theory and applications of nuclear and radiochemistry are studied: atomic structure and nuclear models, the mass energy relationship, nuclear transformations and reactions, natural and artificial radioisotopes, interaction of radiation with matter, and radiation detection and measurement. Research industrial and medical applications and safety considerations of radioisotopes are discussed including radiotracers, activation analysis, radiometric analysis and radiation processing.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC567 Nuclear Fuel Management

The nuclear fuel cycles are studied from the mining to the ultimate disposal of the spent fuel, including the enrichment processes and the reprocessing techniques, from a point of view of the decision-making processes and the evaluation of the operational and economical consequences of these decisions. For the steps within the fuel cycles, the methods of determining the associated costs, in particular those relevant to the disposal of nuclear wastes, and the overall fuel cycle costs are described. Burn-up calculations are performed for the dwelling time of the fuel within the reactor core. The objectives and merits of in-core and out-of-core fuel management are presented. In-core fuel management for Light Water Reactors (LWR) and for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) is analysed in detail, for the refuelling equilibrium as well as for the approach to refuelling equilibrium. The course also covers fuel management for thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors and other advanced fuels such as MOX containing plutonium from discarded nuclear warheads, and DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR fuel in CANDU reactors). Optimization methods used in fuel management are examined along with the most important computer codes.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC569 Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Defence

The principles and characteristics of nuclear weapons will be discussed and related to the physical (thermal, blast) and nuclear radiation (initial, residual, TREE, EMP) effects on humans, structures and equipment. Particular attention will be paid to distance-yield relationships, the distribution of fallout, the characteristics and pathology of acute whole-body radiation, physical and biological dosimetry and radiological survey. The course will include an examination of the composition and biological action of classical nerve, blood, choking and blister agents, as well as detection and decontamination methods and antidotes available. Individual and collective protection measures will also be covered. Such biological agents as bacteria, viruses and rickettsia as well as mid-spectrum agents to include toxins, venom and bioregulators will be addressed.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC573 Nuclear Waste Management

The course begins with a review of the radiations, their interactions with matter and the health effects from acute and chronic doses, and follows with a brief coverage of basic dosimetry and regulations. Radiation shielding is then introduced with examples and problems solved with the software Microshield. The origins and classification of nuclear waste into low-level, medium-level and high-level waste are studied, with emphasis given to the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle (inpool storage and reprocessing). The course also covers topics such as labelling, packaging and transportation of nuclear materials. The various methods presently used and in development for the safe disposal of nuclear waste are then covered, both for the low-level and medium-level waste, and, in particular, for the high-level waste and the spent nuclear fuel. In the latter case, the associated engineering problems are presented in terms of heat transport, radiation shielding and long-term integrity of the containers (corrosion resistance). The deep inground ultimate disposal of high-level waste (salt deposits and the Canadian concept of burial inside granitic plutons within the Canadian Shield) is given special attention, along with other potential methods such as disposal at the bottom of abyssal trenches in oceans, transmutation with fusion reactors and even outer space disposal. In contrast, the retrievable and the surface storage technologies are covered, with emphasis given to the Canadian approach presently implemented at various nuclear sites. The course concludes with a discussion of economical, political and sociological aspects of the nuclear waste management question, including aspects such as ethics and public perception.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC575 Materials in the Space Environment

The dynamical nature of the space environment is examined. The environmental factors of vacuum, temperature, radiation, atomic oxygen, micrometeoroids and space debris are discussed. The impact of this environment on materials (i.e. metals, ceramics, polymers and composites) is considered including an examination of the requirements, design and comparison of various materials used in space. A research project typically involving laboratory experiments and related to materials effects in the space environment also complements this course.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC577 Explosives and Explosions

The course examines the chemistry and parameters of explosives, historical and modern explosives, future development, initiation and propagation of explosions; effects of explosions in gaseous, liquid and solid media; manufacturing aspects and military applications of explosives. The thermodynamic analysis of gas mixtures at elevated temperatures using advanced computer techniques is also covered.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC579 Chemistry of Energetic Materials

This course examines the production processes, chemical properties and reactions of energetic materials, including primary and secondary explosives, propellants and pyrotechnic formulations used in military applications. The topics of safety in handling and transportation, as well as appropriate classifications and regulations will also be discussed. Criteria for sensitivity, and techniques for predicting and measuring the thermal yields and stability are examined. The course will afford a brief review of thermochemistry for those students who might require it.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC587 Mechanism, Kinetics And Model Development

The rational design of chemical reactors requires not only a means to calculate rates of species production/consumption but also, a qualitative understanding of the fundamentals of the reaction. The course examines classical methodologies for inferring mechanism from kinetic data (Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach) and the generation of corresponding rate expressions for calculating reaction velocities. The limitations of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach are discussed. Other methodologies are presented for deriving rate expressions based upon experimental kinetic data. The tools of surface science, as a means to elucidate reaction mechanism, are reviewed.

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC591 Ceramic Engineering

The classification of ceramic materials is first presented, followed by bonding and common crystal structures, which are related to the physical and mechanical properties of these various classes of ceramics. Various processing methods, including powder processing, consolidation, sintering and densification, are covered. The application topics will be adjusted to suit the needs and interests of the candidates. The course includes a small project and laboratory work.

Lectures and laboratories:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC593 Advanced Nuclear Reactor Physics

This course continues the neutronics for the nuclear reactor at steady state seen in course CC523 Nuclear Reactor Engineering with the coverage of the multi-neutron energy group diffusion equation, then covers the multi-region models including the unit cell calculations. Transport theory is then explained and the integrodifferential Boltzmann equation is solved analytically and numerically. The integral transport equation is then studied, and the first collision probability methods (such as PN) are seen. The adjoint equations are seen, followed by the perturbation theory applied to the neutronics calculations. The course concludes with the Monte-Carlo probabilistic techniques applied to the reactor calculations.

Prerequisite:
CC523
Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC595 Nuclear Materials

This course describes the use of materials in nuclear reactors and covers topics in: nuclear energy and materials; material properties; material thermodynamics; primary components and reactor materials (fuel, structural, pressure tubes, control and safety system materials); fundamental effects of radiation damage on materials; engineering implications (creep, corrosion, hydriding and aging phenomena).

Lectures:
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC599 Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry

The explosion of applied analytical chemistry has quietly revolutionized society over the past decades. Advances in medical diagnosis and treatment, forensics, environmental management, electronics, and most forms of production quality control rely heavily on analytical chemistry. In the present course, the fundamental principles of core analytical techniques will be examined, including atomic and molecular spectroscopy and spectrometry, electrochemistry, chromatography and other separation methods.

Lectures and laboratory exercises
3 periods per week (one term)
Credit(s):
1

CC604 Seminar

This is a required seminar course for candidates for a Doctorate. The seminar, presented by the candidate in either official language, is expected to relate to the research programme of the candidate. The seminar although primarily directed to members of the department may include invited visitors and is expected to be of approximately 45 minutes duration. Sufficient background is to be included to effectively communicate with non-specialists in the research area. The candidate will be expected to field a broad range of questions from the audience after the presentation to demonstrate an advanced level of knowledge in the research area. A complementary written version must accompany the seminar. This is expected to be approximately 40 pages and be prepared in the style of a submission to a refereed journal in the field of study. The date of the seminar and standards for the presentation of the written version will be decided in conjunction with the supervisor(s). Written versions of the seminar will be made available to those who so request. Candidates will be graded on their oral delivery and content by at least three graduate faculty members. The written version will be graded by the research supervisor(s). Candidates deemed to have not succeeded will have the opportunity to give a second seminar prior to a failing grade being submitted.

Credit(s):
1

PR500: Project

This code is used when enrolled in a Project

TH500: Thesis (Master's Level)

This code is used when enrolled in a Master's Thesis

TH600: Thesis (Doctoral Level)

This code is used when enrolled in a Doctoral Thesis

CP600: Comprehensive Examination (Doctoral Level)

This code is used when enrolled in a Comprehensive Examination

 
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